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Pit Beef

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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
One of the staples of Maryland eating is pit beef. There's something special about the flavor produced when cooking a beef roast over fire. It's not the most common sandwich to see at the stadium, but when done correctly, it makes for an easy and extremely tasty tailgate. This recipe has you doing most of the cooking at home before the game, with an easy reheating step at the parking lot. Maryland-style pit beef Makes 10-15 sandwiches 1 tablespoon black pepper 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon garlic powder 1 tablespoon chili powder 4-6 pounds top, bottom or eye round beef roast 10-15 soft kaiser rolls 2 large white onions (sliced very thin)
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Bob Creager opened his tiny pit beef stand in the parking lot of a Southeast Baltimore nightclub in 1987. The stand had no electricity. Creager had never run a business. And the former steelworker had no idea how to cook pit beef. "I was struggling," Creager says. These days, Creager's establishment - Chaps Pit Beef - is a Baltimore legend. His stand, in the parking lot of the Gentlemen's Gold Club on Pulaski Highway, has been featured on national television shows five times.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Bob Creager opened his tiny pit beef stand in the parking lot of a Southeast Baltimore nightclub in 1987. The stand had no electricity. Creager had never run a business. And the former steelworker had no idea how to cook pit beef. "I was struggling," Creager says. These days, Creager's establishment - Chaps Pit Beef - is a Baltimore legend. His stand, in the parking lot of the Gentlemen's Gold Club on Pulaski Highway, has been featured on national television shows five times.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
One of the staples of Maryland eating is pit beef. There's something special about the flavor produced when cooking a beef roast over fire. It's not the most common sandwich to see at the stadium, but when done correctly, it makes for an easy and extremely tasty tailgate. This recipe has you doing most of the cooking at home before the game, with an easy reheating step at the parking lot. Maryland-style pit beef Makes 10-15 sandwiches 1 tablespoon black pepper 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon garlic powder 1 tablespoon chili powder 4-6 pounds top, bottom or eye round beef roast 10-15 soft kaiser rolls 2 large white onions (sliced very thin)
FEATURES
July 19, 1992
We sampled the sandwiches at 10 area pit beef stands. Here they are, in random order, with our reviews of everything from the cooking fires to the fixin's.Big Al's Pit Beef.Address: 7900 block of Pulaski Highway.Construction materials: Cedar shingles.Cooking method: Gas.Meat quality: Lack of wood robs meat of flavor.L Fixin's: Mayo, horseradish, barbecue sauce, onions, Tabasco.Ambience: Next to Murphy's Nite Life bar.Price: $3.10.Andy Nelson's.Address: Valley View Farms nursery, 11035 York Road, Cockeysville.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | August 28, 2008
Pioneer Pit Beef in Woodlawn does not accept credit cards. It is open only six hours a day. It does not have a telephone number you can call to place an order. You have to stand in line, sometimes a long one, and wait. It has very limited seating, one picnic table set up outdoors. Yet the customers flock there. Starting around lunchtime every day except Sunday, the cars with husbands and wives, the trucks driven by plumbers and the vans piloted by BGE workmen wheel into the Pioneer parking lot. This is a place folks probably smell before they see. A smokestack on the roof sends an enticing smoky perfume into the roaring traffic of nearby Interstate 70. This is not a yogurt-for-lunch crowd.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 2004
It's impossible to place the Charcoal Deli in Cockeysville in any one carryout category. Imagine a Baltimore-style pit-beef joint crossed with boardwalk cuisine, served with a side of Western ranch flair. What's more, the place sits next to a pool hall, around the corner from a couple of other smoky rib-and-beef places, making this spot the barbecue epicenter of Baltimore County. To add to its eclectic appeal, the Charcoal Deli, open year-round, looks a little like a diner you might imagine in Dodge City.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
Clifton A. Milway, a retired career utility company lineman who was known for his flavorful slow-cooked pit beef, died June 21 of complications from a broken hip at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The Bel Air resident was 90. The son of farmers, Mr. Milway was born and raised in Fork, where he graduated from public schools. He served in the Army during World War II. Mr. Milway went to work as a lineman in 1946 for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., from which he retired in 1986.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1998
Dean Jones didn't mind grabbing a sudsy mitt yesterday and soaping up the light bar atop a Baltimore County police officer's patrol car."They cleaned up our neighborhood, we'll clean up their cars," said Jones, a resident of the 300 block of Nicholson Road.Jones was among dozens of neighbors in the Essex community who washed cars and served up pit beef in appreciation of police efforts to run drug dealers and unruly neighbors out of their community.The neighborhood threw the block party to thank the police for the June 11 raid of four houses that resulted in nine drug arrests.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | May 8, 2006
The omelet guy is not optimistic. It's way past 5 in the morning and the spot under the Jones Falls Expressway where the pit beef man would be -should be - at a farmers' market Sunday, is conspicuously empty. "No, I don't think he's coming," the doubting omelet maker says with a shrug. "He's always here by now." Oh, ye of little faith. Of course he's coming. He was there at the market's birth 29 years ago. He was there as it hopscotched across town from location to location before settling into its current address, where highway grime meets the freshest of produce.
EXPLORE
September 16, 2013
A small church is making big plans to welcome the fall season on Saturday, Sept. 28 for Fallston families and their neighbors throughout the county. Members of Holy Communion Lutheran Church are busy organizing their first Fall Extravaganza to help bring families in the community together by providing fun and fellowship for all, silent auctions, raffles and pit beef for the adults, and free games, pony rides, food and prizes for kids. The event happens just six days after the official start of fall, the autumnal equinox, when day and night are equal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2012
The Maryland State Fair begins on Friday, and the Midway will again be the place for perennial favorites such as funnel cake and Italian sausage. But there are a few new twists for 2012, according to Jim Ingram of Deggeller Attractions, the Stuart, Fla.-based carnival company that stocks the Midway with rides, amusements and food. Making their Timonium debut will be two new chicken booths, one selling a variety of wings with fresh-cut fries and the other chicken-on-a-stick with ribbon fries.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 19, 2012
A benefit will be held Sunday for the two young children of Ashley Bauguess, one of three siblings killed in a car crash on Route 543 in February. The benefit takes place from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday at the Darlington/Dublin VFW, 3440 Conowingo Road in Darlington. Tickets are $15 advance, $20 at the door. Tickets are $10 for children 6-12; children under 6 admitted free. Live entertainment will be provided by JD Sage and The Dagnabits. Pit beef, pit ham, macaroni salad, baked beans and chips will be served.
EXPLORE
July 6, 2011
The West Laurel Wahoos have been having a terrific swim season. They started off the swim season with a big win defeating Whitehall. Since then, they have had two very narrow losses. Despite the losses, Wahoos have had some spectacular swims with double and triple wins by Max Bagileo, Danielle Calabrese, Olivia Petrusky, Lee Friedman, Eric Brothman, Cara Samson, Billy Rosenberg and Jessica Sweitzer. If you happen to drive by the West Laurel Swim Club on a Saturday morning when they are having a swim meet, you will see a full parking lot and parked cars overflowing onto Brooklyn Bridge Road.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
Clifton A. Milway, a retired career utility company lineman who was known for his flavorful slow-cooked pit beef, died June 21 of complications from a broken hip at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The Bel Air resident was 90. The son of farmers, Mr. Milway was born and raised in Fork, where he graduated from public schools. He served in the Army during World War II. Mr. Milway went to work as a lineman in 1946 for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., from which he retired in 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2010
Anthony Bourdain was about to say that he was "sorry" for the way he depicted Baltimore on his "No Reservations" show last winter on the Travel Channel. In that piece, he characterized Baltimore as a gritty city as he prowled rundown neighborhoods with characters from "The Wire," ate lake trout at The Roost, pit beef at Chaps, and chugged bluish cocktails with construction workers at Mo's Seafood. The episode provoked outrage among some Baltimore pundits and bloggers, who thought it dissed the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2010
Anthony Bourdain was about to say that he was "sorry" for the way he depicted Baltimore on his "No Reservations" show last winter on the Travel Channel. In that piece, he characterized Baltimore as a gritty city as he prowled rundown neighborhoods with characters from "The Wire," ate lake trout at The Roost in West Baltimore and pit beef at Chaps on Pulaski Highway, and chugged bluish cocktails with construction workers at Mo's Seafood in East Baltimore. The episode provoked outrage among some city pundits and bloggers, who thought it dissed the city.
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