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Pistachios

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By Gwen Schoen and Gwen Schoen,McClatchy-Tribune | November 12, 2008
Some people take pistachios for granted. We love them sprinkled liberally over ice cream. Shaved over salads. Toasted and chopped for a halibut crust. Packed for some crunch punch in cookies. Sunken like treasure in soups. Dusted with tangy spice rubs. Even straight-up with a drink at the game - they can give peanuts an inferiority complex. Pistachios are native to the Middle East and are likely the oldest cultivated nut tree in history. Archaeological evidence shows traces of pistachios as far back as 7000 B.C. The first commercial pistachio crop was grown in California in 1976 and it produced 1.5 million pounds of nuts.
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard | October 2, 2014
At Lib's Grill in Perry Hall, Chef Daniel Chaustit welcomes the summer months with bright colors and the fresh flavors of seasonal fruits. This salad celebrates a variety of flavors and textures, combining crunchy fennel, meaty pistachios, tangy goat cheese, sweet strawberries and earthy beets. On the plate, the riot of color “screams summer,” says Lib's Grill manager Nick Liberatore. Great flavors, fun colors and wild textures? That's definitely something to shout about. Roasted Beets and Goat Cheese with Pomegranate Molasses & Fennel Salt Serves 4 2 pounds assorted beets 2 tablespoons neutral oil, such as vegetable oil Salt to taste ¼ cup toasted pistachios 1 tablespoon roasted fennel seeds ¼ cup strawberries, hulled 1 cup baby arugula 1 bulb baby fennel ¼ cup sherry vinegar ¿ cup kosher salt ¼ cup goat cheese Pomegranate molasses (available at most Middle Eastern or Asian markets)
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard | October 2, 2014
At Lib's Grill in Perry Hall, Chef Daniel Chaustit welcomes the summer months with bright colors and the fresh flavors of seasonal fruits. This salad celebrates a variety of flavors and textures, combining crunchy fennel, meaty pistachios, tangy goat cheese, sweet strawberries and earthy beets. On the plate, the riot of color “screams summer,” says Lib's Grill manager Nick Liberatore. Great flavors, fun colors and wild textures? That's definitely something to shout about. Roasted Beets and Goat Cheese with Pomegranate Molasses & Fennel Salt Serves 4 2 pounds assorted beets 2 tablespoons neutral oil, such as vegetable oil Salt to taste ¼ cup toasted pistachios 1 tablespoon roasted fennel seeds ¼ cup strawberries, hulled 1 cup baby arugula 1 bulb baby fennel ¼ cup sherry vinegar ¿ cup kosher salt ¼ cup goat cheese Pomegranate molasses (available at most Middle Eastern or Asian markets)
NEWS
April 18, 2009
Jury notes ruled not disclosed 2 A judge has found that six jury notes were not disclosed to lawyers during the trial of two men who were ultimately convicted in 2006 of the near-beheadings of their three young relatives. The findings make it more likely that Policarpio Espinoza and Adan Canela will get a new trial, which would be their third. The two illegal Mexican immigrants were sentenced to life in prison for the deaths in 2004 of a 9-year-old boy, his 8-year-old sister and their 10-year-old cousin in a Falstaff apartment.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | November 1, 2000
For fresher flour When Gold Medal Flour made its debut in 1880, it came packaged in 196-pound wooden barrels. Eventually, the company changed to cloth bags and then paper. Now, the company has changed its package again, this time to a 4 1/4 -pound resealable plastic bag designed to be more convenient and keep flour fresher. Nutty in California California growers expect to harvest a record crop of 205 million pounds of pistachios this season. Try this recipe from the California Pistachio Commission: Combine the juice from one orange, 1 tablespoon packed brown sugar, 2 teaspoons of lemon juice and 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon.
FEATURES
December 29, 1999
Party appetizer is easy, cheesyThe countdown is on -- and not just to New Year's. There's still time to whip up one more appetizer (pictured above) for holiday guests. And this one is as simple as 1-2-3 -- ingredients, that is. Thickly spread slices of French-bread baguettes with soft, ripe brie cheese. Top with coarsely chopped, natural pistachios.-- From the California Pistachio CommissionServing champagneBefore pouring the bubbly on Friday night, party hosts should anticipate that a regular-size (750-milliliter)
NEWS
April 18, 2009
Jury notes ruled not disclosed 2 A judge has found that six jury notes were not disclosed to lawyers during the trial of two men who were ultimately convicted in 2006 of the near-beheadings of their three young relatives. The findings make it more likely that Policarpio Espinoza and Adan Canela will get a new trial, which would be their third. The two illegal Mexican immigrants were sentenced to life in prison for the deaths in 2004 of a 9-year-old boy, his 8-year-old sister and their 10-year-old cousin in a Falstaff apartment.
NEWS
By WILL ENGLUND and WILL ENGLUND,Will Englund is a Moscow correspondent for The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 1993
Tashkent, Uzbekistan. -- The mindless pop music thumps away at the "Istanbul" cellar restaurant here; the prostitutes conscientiously ply their trade at the hard-currency hotel; the markets groan with melons, carrots, spices and pistachios -- all in all, it doesn't really look like a police state.But the government is cracking down on its scattered opposition here with a vengeance.Jailings, beatings and rigged trials are giving Uzbekistan -- the largest and most important of the new countries of Central Asia -- the worst human rights record of any former Soviet republic not now engulfed in a shooting war.Uzbekistan's internal crackdown has sharply intensified this month, driving even the moderate opposition nearly to desperation.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1995
When it comes to this cake, some call it Pistachio while others refer to it as the Watergate Cake.Debbie Asbury of Baltimore called it pistachio when she requested the recipe. She wrote that the cake was her husband's favorite.Most of the responses were similar except for the title. Two recipes from Baltimore were chosen. One from Joyce Michael was like the majority. But a very different one came from Cathy Matthews.Michael's Pistachio Cake1 package (2-layer size) white or yellow cake mix1 package (4-serving size)
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 2, 1998
TEL AVIV, Israel -- Of all the issues that divide the United States and Israel these days, who would think that one of them was pistachio nuts?Israelis have a passion for the tasty nuts, and they've been importing them from one of the biggest pariahs in the region -- Iran.For more than a year, pushed by American pistachio growers, the United States has tried to pressure Israel to suspend the illegal importation of Iranian pistachios. America has threatened to punish lesser allies for doing business with Iran in violation of the U.S. trade embargo.
NEWS
By Gwen Schoen and Gwen Schoen,McClatchy-Tribune | November 12, 2008
Some people take pistachios for granted. We love them sprinkled liberally over ice cream. Shaved over salads. Toasted and chopped for a halibut crust. Packed for some crunch punch in cookies. Sunken like treasure in soups. Dusted with tangy spice rubs. Even straight-up with a drink at the game - they can give peanuts an inferiority complex. Pistachios are native to the Middle East and are likely the oldest cultivated nut tree in history. Archaeological evidence shows traces of pistachios as far back as 7000 B.C. The first commercial pistachio crop was grown in California in 1976 and it produced 1.5 million pounds of nuts.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 12, 2004
Several weeks ago in Paris, at a small Left Bank eatery called Les Ormes, I ordered Sole With Pistachios. Every bite was pure bliss, so I chatted with the waiter and took notes about this splendid main course. The sole had been prepared a la meuniere, which translates to "in the style of the miller's wife." This simple technique calls for thin fish fillets to be dipped in milk, dusted with flour, then quickly sauteed in butter until golden. A drizzle of melted butter, a squeeze of lemon and a sprinkle of parsley are final touches.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | June 15, 2003
Once again summer has arrived in New England, and we have glorious weather with temperatures stretching into the 80s and days when the sun shines until 9 at night. It's also the season for friends to make detours to our house. Some are traveling through the area, looking at colleges with their high school juniors and seniors -- stopping to take a tour of Amherst College, where my husband teaches. Others are passing through on their way to the Berkshires, to Cape Cod or to Maine. We feel pretty popular at this time of the year and find ourselves entertaining often.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | November 1, 2000
For fresher flour When Gold Medal Flour made its debut in 1880, it came packaged in 196-pound wooden barrels. Eventually, the company changed to cloth bags and then paper. Now, the company has changed its package again, this time to a 4 1/4 -pound resealable plastic bag designed to be more convenient and keep flour fresher. Nutty in California California growers expect to harvest a record crop of 205 million pounds of pistachios this season. Try this recipe from the California Pistachio Commission: Combine the juice from one orange, 1 tablespoon packed brown sugar, 2 teaspoons of lemon juice and 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
With a beachhead in the Washington area, Trader Joe's is now betting its unconventional grocery stores will make a splash in Baltimore. The privately owned, West Coast chain, an unlikely blend of gourmet products, health foods, grocery staples and low prices, will open its first area store in Towson next month and is eyeing other potential sites. "It's more than a one-store market for us, that's for sure" - though the company has no immediate plans beyond Towson, said Michele Gorski, a spokeswoman for Trader Joe's East Inc. in Needham Heights, Mass.
FEATURES
December 29, 1999
Party appetizer is easy, cheesyThe countdown is on -- and not just to New Year's. There's still time to whip up one more appetizer (pictured above) for holiday guests. And this one is as simple as 1-2-3 -- ingredients, that is. Thickly spread slices of French-bread baguettes with soft, ripe brie cheese. Top with coarsely chopped, natural pistachios.-- From the California Pistachio CommissionServing champagneBefore pouring the bubbly on Friday night, party hosts should anticipate that a regular-size (750-milliliter)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | June 15, 2003
Once again summer has arrived in New England, and we have glorious weather with temperatures stretching into the 80s and days when the sun shines until 9 at night. It's also the season for friends to make detours to our house. Some are traveling through the area, looking at colleges with their high school juniors and seniors -- stopping to take a tour of Amherst College, where my husband teaches. Others are passing through on their way to the Berkshires, to Cape Cod or to Maine. We feel pretty popular at this time of the year and find ourselves entertaining often.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 12, 2004
Several weeks ago in Paris, at a small Left Bank eatery called Les Ormes, I ordered Sole With Pistachios. Every bite was pure bliss, so I chatted with the waiter and took notes about this splendid main course. The sole had been prepared a la meuniere, which translates to "in the style of the miller's wife." This simple technique calls for thin fish fillets to be dipped in milk, dusted with flour, then quickly sauteed in butter until golden. A drizzle of melted butter, a squeeze of lemon and a sprinkle of parsley are final touches.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 26, 1998
Now that the temperatures are rising and bulbs are blooming, I am abandoning robust winter dishes for lighter ones, and, in particular, I have been adding cool, refreshing desserts to my repertoire.Among my new creations, delectable lime pistachio bars have become a personal favorite. I love lemon bars and decided to try a variation of these celebrated confections.They can be doubled or tripled easily and prepared a day ahead, so they are ideal for parties.Lime Pistachio BarsMakes 16 barsfor the crust:nonstick vegetable cooking spray1 cup flour2 tablespoons confectioners sugar8 tablespoons unsalted butter, chilled and cut into small chunksfor the filling and topping:2 large eggs3/4 cup sugar2 tablespoons flour1/4 teaspoon baking powder4 teaspoons lime zest (grated color portion of rind)
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 2, 1998
TEL AVIV, Israel -- Of all the issues that divide the United States and Israel these days, who would think that one of them was pistachio nuts?Israelis have a passion for the tasty nuts, and they've been importing them from one of the biggest pariahs in the region -- Iran.For more than a year, pushed by American pistachio growers, the United States has tried to pressure Israel to suspend the illegal importation of Iranian pistachios. America has threatened to punish lesser allies for doing business with Iran in violation of the U.S. trade embargo.
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