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NEWS
By Kevin Cullen and Kevin Cullen,BOSTON GLOBE | June 20, 2001
PISA, Italy - The Leaning Tower of Pisa, the gravity-defying icon of imperfection, has reopened this month, 11 years after it was closed to the public because of fears it might collapse. The $30 million project to stabilize the 12th-century tower and return it to the sustainable tilt of 163 years ago is being hailed as one of the great engineering feats of all time. But some of those who worked on the project say the technical challenges paled in comparison to negotiating the political minefields in a country that has elevated second-guessing to an art. Three of the 14 specialists originally appointed to the commission that figured out how to save the tower died before the project was completed.
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NEWS
By Renee Foose | December 2, 2013
Educators need to have a clear understanding of how well we're educating students, not just in comparison to other students within the region or the nation but throughout the world. As the country moves beyond the "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB) era of high-stakes, low-utility assessments, a national debate is ensuing about what an assessment program should look like and, in some cases, whether we should have standardized assessments at all. The criticism of testing is understandable.
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SPORTS
November 17, 2005
"It was either I was going to be crazy and everybody else was right, or I was going to have to prove some people wrong." Grant Hill Orlando Magic forward, on coming back from injury last season "Because he's from Hawaii, he wears No. 50 - and nobody can say Pisa Tinoisamoa." Steve Raible Seattle Seahawks announcer, on why his St. Louis Rams teammates call Tinoisamoa "Hawaii Five-0"
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | March 16, 2009
Maryland officials are considering giving a sampling of students an international test next fall to gauge how well the state's public schools are preparing students to compete with others in the world. The test being most closely scrutinized received a critical evaluation from the Brookings Institution recently because it is not geared to testing students on the material they learned in school, but rather on their general knowledge. The Programme for International Student Assessment, known as PISA, was last given in 2006 in 57 countries, including the United States, and is scheduled to be given again this fall.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | March 16, 2009
Maryland officials are considering giving a sampling of students an international test next fall to gauge how well the state's public schools are preparing students to compete with others in the world. The test being most closely scrutinized received a critical evaluation from the Brookings Institution recently because it is not geared to testing students on the material they learned in school, but rather on their general knowledge. The Programme for International Student Assessment, known as PISA, was last given in 2006 in 57 countries, including the United States, and is scheduled to be given again this fall.
TRAVEL
By SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | July 9, 2006
We have a 15-year-old son with cerebral palsy who needs a full-support wheelchair because he has no sitting balance. We have asked the airlines about using a harness for air travel, but have run into dead ends. Can you help? The Federal Aviation Administration's only requirement for passengers is that they be able to sit in an upright position while flying. After that, it comes down to each airline's regulations. We contacted three major carriers and asked about their policies. American Airlines said they would allow your son to travel with the use of a harness as long as it had a single-point release system similar to a traditional seat belt.
NEWS
By Renee Foose | December 2, 2013
Educators need to have a clear understanding of how well we're educating students, not just in comparison to other students within the region or the nation but throughout the world. As the country moves beyond the "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB) era of high-stakes, low-utility assessments, a national debate is ensuing about what an assessment program should look like and, in some cases, whether we should have standardized assessments at all. The criticism of testing is understandable.
TRAVEL
By Mary Forgione and Mary Forgione,Los Angeles Times | July 1, 2007
Quick, what's the difference between airports and museums? This summer, visitors flying out of Baltimore or into places such as Pisa, Italy, will ponder that question. When travelers touch down at Galileo Galilei International Airport in Pisa, they will find a surreal scene. "They've turned the airport into a Nall installation," the Alabama-born artist (who once went by Nall Hollis) says of his artwork, which is on display inside and outside the building. "The whole facade is covered with plastic reproductions of mosaics that are two stories high."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 28, 1999
Are you ready for the Pisa Pizza Buffet? It's scheduled to open in early November in the York Road shopping center across from the Timonium Fairgrounds.The name might not grab you, but the concept is colossal. All the pizza, calzone, pasta, Italian bread, salad and dessert pizza you can eat for $3.99! Twenty-five specialty pizzas on the buffet! A game room like ESPNZone! Big-creen TVs! Decor like Ruth's Chris Steak House! (OK, I haven't seen it. That's according to co-owner Joseph Impallaria.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | January 10, 1999
The time has come for us, as a nation, to resolve this wrenching issue, so that we can move on. This issue has been with us for far too long, weighing on our minds, sitting heavy on our hearts, bloating the intestines of our national consciousness with the twin gases of partisanship and hate.I am referring, as you have no doubt gathered, to the bitter controversy concerning the location of the Leaning Tower of Pisa. This controversy got started when I wrote a column in which I stated that the Leaning Tower of Pisa is located in Paris, France.
TRAVEL
By Mary Forgione and Mary Forgione,Los Angeles Times | July 1, 2007
Quick, what's the difference between airports and museums? This summer, visitors flying out of Baltimore or into places such as Pisa, Italy, will ponder that question. When travelers touch down at Galileo Galilei International Airport in Pisa, they will find a surreal scene. "They've turned the airport into a Nall installation," the Alabama-born artist (who once went by Nall Hollis) says of his artwork, which is on display inside and outside the building. "The whole facade is covered with plastic reproductions of mosaics that are two stories high."
TRAVEL
By SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | July 9, 2006
We have a 15-year-old son with cerebral palsy who needs a full-support wheelchair because he has no sitting balance. We have asked the airlines about using a harness for air travel, but have run into dead ends. Can you help? The Federal Aviation Administration's only requirement for passengers is that they be able to sit in an upright position while flying. After that, it comes down to each airline's regulations. We contacted three major carriers and asked about their policies. American Airlines said they would allow your son to travel with the use of a harness as long as it had a single-point release system similar to a traditional seat belt.
SPORTS
November 17, 2005
"It was either I was going to be crazy and everybody else was right, or I was going to have to prove some people wrong." Grant Hill Orlando Magic forward, on coming back from injury last season "Because he's from Hawaii, he wears No. 50 - and nobody can say Pisa Tinoisamoa." Steve Raible Seattle Seahawks announcer, on why his St. Louis Rams teammates call Tinoisamoa "Hawaii Five-0"
NEWS
By Kevin Cullen and Kevin Cullen,BOSTON GLOBE | June 20, 2001
PISA, Italy - The Leaning Tower of Pisa, the gravity-defying icon of imperfection, has reopened this month, 11 years after it was closed to the public because of fears it might collapse. The $30 million project to stabilize the 12th-century tower and return it to the sustainable tilt of 163 years ago is being hailed as one of the great engineering feats of all time. But some of those who worked on the project say the technical challenges paled in comparison to negotiating the political minefields in a country that has elevated second-guessing to an art. Three of the 14 specialists originally appointed to the commission that figured out how to save the tower died before the project was completed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 28, 1999
Are you ready for the Pisa Pizza Buffet? It's scheduled to open in early November in the York Road shopping center across from the Timonium Fairgrounds.The name might not grab you, but the concept is colossal. All the pizza, calzone, pasta, Italian bread, salad and dessert pizza you can eat for $3.99! Twenty-five specialty pizzas on the buffet! A game room like ESPNZone! Big-creen TVs! Decor like Ruth's Chris Steak House! (OK, I haven't seen it. That's according to co-owner Joseph Impallaria.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 26, 2003
Tilt: A Skewed History of the Tower of Pisa, by Nicholas Shrady. Simon & Schuster. 192 pages. $21.95. A shrewd little combination history, travelogue and architecture / engineering analysis of what must be Earth's pre-eminent weird building. To make the point, the publisher has manufactured the volume on the bias -- the spine rises at a 15-degree tilt from the vertical, though the Tower of Pisa itself, today, leans only 5 degrees, and leaned 1.6 degrees when built in 1370. The structure -- actually a campanile, a bell tower -- has challenged, worried, delighted and angered technicians and aesthetes for all the 520-some years of its life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Richardson and Cameron Barry and David Richardson and Cameron Barry,Special to the Sun | January 6, 2000
Pisa Pizza Buffet is run with the precision of an Army platoon, and indeed, one member of the staff informed us, two of the owners are "ex-military." We have no doubt they kept their troops in line. Pisa Pizza, open just three weeks when we visited, is clean and organized, and there is no slacking, which is important when you serve 25 different kinds of pizza at $3.99 for all you can eat ($2.99 for kids). No, we're not kidding. If you have children, and pizza is one of the food groups they acknowledge, run, do not walk, to this place.
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