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Pirates Of Penzance

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July 29, 1991
"The Pirates of Penzance," the swashbuckling musical by Gilbert and Sullivan, is being performed outdoors on the shores of St. Mary's River in historic St. Mary's City.Performed by InterAct, a professional theater group from Washington, the show (Aug. 1-4) is being produced jointly by St. Mary's College and the Historic St. Mary's City Museum. Audience members are invited to bring their own lawn chairs and blankets. Tickets are $12 general admission and $10 for students and seniors. Tickets can also be purchased at the door.
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April 1, 2013
The Patterson Mill Middle School Drama Company performed "Pirates of Penzance Jr. " on March 22 to 24. Cast members included Todd Campo, Valerie Ziegler, Grace Fisher, Kaitlyn Iwanowski, Caleb Blomquist, Jonathan Myers, Cameron Warlick, Ali Leary, Hannah Moots, Anna Odell, Elise Alders, Ellie Byers, Makayla Hauk-Meyer, Hannah Lorenzo, Caroline McCarthy, Caren Meckelnberg, Lauren Piercy, Regan Rich, Meg Thompson, Jody Bogner, Cheyenne Croteau, Jade...
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 1996
We know from recent events that the folks over at the Naval Academy have developed a flair for soap opera. But on Saturday evening, the midshipmen proved they could handle grand opera as well.The occasion was "A Night at the Opera," a program of opera choruses in which the local troops were joined by the Goucher College Chorus and members of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra.John Barry Talley took the Alumni Hall podium to conduct this 23rd annual "Spring Oratorio" concert -- the final event on this season's Distinguished Artists Series.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | July 16, 2009
There is something gloriously indestructible about the operettas of Gilbert and Sullivan. The music sounds fresh and charming, even in the most jaded or cynical of times. The plots manage to hold up, even when their seams show, and still generate sufficient interest and humor. The Pirates of Penzance is a particularly strong example, boasting a felicitous score that reveals the remarkable depth of Sullivan's lyrical craft and his ability to complement Gilbert's clever words imaginatively.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 7, 1996
The best thing about the Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre's youth production of Gilbert and Sullivan's wonderful operetta "The Pirates of Penzance" is that the kids are having a marvelous time entering into the snappy atmosphere that only a G&S show can create.As a result, facial takes are hammed up, pink parasols spin with abandon, mustachioed policemen shake their knees in abject fear, and most of W. S. Gilbert's spicy patter comes across like gangbusters.It's a fun show, as a large, enthusiastic audience found out Wednesday evening at the charming outdoor theater diagonally across from City Dock.
FEATURES
By Kirsten Valle and Kirsten Valle,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
Kevin Kilner seems right at home onstage at the Bryn Mawr School's Centennial Hall, cracking jokes and belting out anthems of a pirate's life. It might be because the veteran actor has performed everywhere from the small screen to the silver screen to the Broadway stage. But it also could simply be that Kilner, a Baltimore native and lacrosse-star-turned-movie-star, has finally come home. Kilner's role as the Pirate King in the Young Victorian Theatre Company's 34th annual production, The Pirates of Penzance (July 8-18)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | July 16, 2009
There is something gloriously indestructible about the operettas of Gilbert and Sullivan. The music sounds fresh and charming, even in the most jaded or cynical of times. The plots manage to hold up, even when their seams show, and still generate sufficient interest and humor. The Pirates of Penzance is a particularly strong example, boasting a felicitous score that reveals the remarkable depth of Sullivan's lyrical craft and his ability to complement Gilbert's clever words imaginatively.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 29, 2000
Piracy in Pennsylvania Carl Schurr, the Baltimore-based artistic director of Totem Pole Playhouse, has wanted to produce a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta at the summer theater for years. He's finally getting his chance with "The Pirates of Penzance," which opens there Wednesday. Robert Randle stars as Frederic, the pirate apprentice, under the direction of Broadway actress and director Pamela Sousa. Here's the rest of the 50th anniversary season at the Fayetteville, Pa., theater: "Papa Is All," a Pennsylvania-Dutch comedy by Patterson Greene, July 18-30; "Deathtrap," a thriller by Ira Levin, Aug. 1-13; and "A Tuna Christmas," the further adventures of the denizens of the fictitious third-smallest town in Texas, by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard, Aug. 15-27.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 1997
The summer concert series in Quiet Waters Park begins Saturday with "Operetta in the Park," a presentation by Annapolis Opera.The program will feature songs from such works as Victor Herbert's "Naughty Marietta," Jerome Kern's "Showboat," Sigmund Romberg's "The Student Prince," George Gershwin's "Porgy and Bess," Rudolf Friml's "The Vagabond King," and Johann Strauss' "Die Fledermaus." Gilbert and Sullivan favorites from "The Pirates of Penzance," "The Mikado" and "H.M.S. Pinafore" are also scheduled.
NEWS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 23, 1997
In Sunday's Arts section, an incorrect day was given for auditions for the Young Victorian Theatre Company's July production of Gilbert and Sullivan's "Pirates of Penzance." The auditions will take place from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the Bryn Mawr School, 109 W. Melrose Ave. Call (410) 659-1308.The Sun regrets the error.The Walters Art Gallery is looking for volunteers interested in helping with the day-to-day operations of the exhibition "The First Emperor: Treasures from Ancient China."
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH | July 7, 2009
Any number of arts organizations in Baltimore have come and gone over the decades, while the Young Victorian Theatre Company keeps chugging along, to the appreciation of Gilbert and Sullivan fans throughout the area. The troupe's 39th season opens this weekend with The Pirates of Penzance, which gently skewers social class distinctions, inept and blustery military and police, and slavish devotion to duty. The libretto finds Gilbert in particularly witty form. Sullivan's score is full of charm and sophistication, reaching a height of cleverness in an Act 1 number that combines a waltz for the operetta's love couple with a different tune and meter for lady choristers chattering away in counterpoint.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | January 23, 2008
By putting a current spin on The Pirates of Penzance, Anne Arundel Community College Opera may well transform students and other young audience members into Gilbert and Sullivan devotees. This production, which opens Friday for a two-weekend run, is even more accessible than the operas presented in past seasons, though all gained relevance by changing location and period. The Bartered Bride was transported to Maryland's Eastern Shore and The Elixir of Love was set in a 1930s village in Tennessee.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 16, 2004
Great fun and masterful music-making marked the Annapolis Chorale's concert opening its 32nd season and yearlong celebration of J. Ernest Green's 20th anniversary as artistic director. Green's estimable tenure has seen the company grow into the largest performing arts organization in Annapolis, with nearly 300 in the full chorale, chamber chorus, Annapolis Chamber Orchestra and Youth Chorus. The groups will perform more than 20 concerts this season. In the opening moments of Saturday's concert, Green reminded the audience of the Sept.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 2004
A couple of generations back, music lovers were treated to the choral idiom in church, and that was about it. Only sporadically did they hear it anywhere else. Municipal choirs (and usually only big cities had them) were good for a concert at Christmas and perhaps an annual appearance with the local symphony orchestra. Full-blown concert seasons of their own? Not a chance. That has changed. With all the musical talent around these days, much of it imbued with the spirits of cultural and entrepreneurial activism, civic choirs have become musical hubs of their communities, presenting diverse, full-length concert seasons, often with their own orchestras in tow. And it is not only the big cities that get them, which local concertgoers know from following the fortunes of the Annapolis Chorale for the past couple of decades.
FEATURES
By Kirsten Valle and Kirsten Valle,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
Kevin Kilner seems right at home onstage at the Bryn Mawr School's Centennial Hall, cracking jokes and belting out anthems of a pirate's life. It might be because the veteran actor has performed everywhere from the small screen to the silver screen to the Broadway stage. But it also could simply be that Kilner, a Baltimore native and lacrosse-star-turned-movie-star, has finally come home. Kilner's role as the Pirate King in the Young Victorian Theatre Company's 34th annual production, The Pirates of Penzance (July 8-18)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Blum and Michael Blum,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
Victoria Brownworth wrote here last week, "Magical is how critics have described Gilbert and Sullivan's comic opera The Pirates of Penzance. Act 1 opens on leap day 1897 with Frederic, an indentured young pirate, turning 21 and thus free from his indenturing. But as the plot progresses (with some of the most hilarious lyrics in the history of musical theater), it becomes known that Frederic, a leaper, has actually passed only five birthdays and a little more, and thus he must desert his love, Mabel, whom he asks to wait for him (neither seeming to have actually calculated the 60-odd years it will take for him to celebrate the remaining 16 birthdays)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2001
For their 18th spring concert, director Glenette Schumacher and her 70-voice Arundel Vocal Arts Society presented Gilbert and Sullivan's "Pirates of Penzance" in the first half of the program, followed in the second half by some of Broadway's brightest musical lights, such as Jule Styne, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Meredith Willson and Leonard Bernstein. Saturday's program at Anne Arundel Community College's Pascal Center featured six fine soloists and a terrific trio of instrumentalists - Cynthia Slate on piano, Adrian Cox on bass and percussionist William Watson.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2001
For their 18th spring concert, director Glenette Schumacher and her 70-voice Arundel Vocal Arts Society presented Gilbert and Sullivan's "Pirates of Penzance" in the first half of the program, followed in the second half by some of Broadway's brightest musical lights, such as Jule Styne, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Meredith Willson and Leonard Bernstein. Saturday's program at Anne Arundel Community College's Pascal Center featured six fine soloists and a terrific trio of instrumentalists - Cynthia Slate on piano, Adrian Cox on bass and percussionist William Watson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 29, 2000
Piracy in Pennsylvania Carl Schurr, the Baltimore-based artistic director of Totem Pole Playhouse, has wanted to produce a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta at the summer theater for years. He's finally getting his chance with "The Pirates of Penzance," which opens there Wednesday. Robert Randle stars as Frederic, the pirate apprentice, under the direction of Broadway actress and director Pamela Sousa. Here's the rest of the 50th anniversary season at the Fayetteville, Pa., theater: "Papa Is All," a Pennsylvania-Dutch comedy by Patterson Greene, July 18-30; "Deathtrap," a thriller by Ira Levin, Aug. 1-13; and "A Tuna Christmas," the further adventures of the denizens of the fictitious third-smallest town in Texas, by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard, Aug. 15-27.
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