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By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2001
The "pirate ships," the Inner Harbor's amphibious tour boats, have ceased operations after just one season because they lost money and were facing unexpected capital expenses, a company spokesman said yesterday. "It was a venture that strayed from our original core business," said Robert Schwarz, executive vice president for communications for Peter Pan Bus Lines Inc., which operated the ships. "We tried it. We made a significant capital investment. We gave it our best shot. But we felt that the numbers were against us."
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 24, 2013
Registration is open for The Children's Center of North Harford's 2013 Summer Adventures Program. Open to children ages 4 to 11, Summer Adventures is set to begin Monday, June 17 and offers 10 theme-based weeks of fun and learning. Weekly themes include The Rainforest, Prehistoric Times and Down on the Farm as well as many others. The program runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Before and after care are optional and run from 6:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. The Summer Adventures Program will be held in the newly renovated school-age classroom.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
After his mother died suddenly 21/2 years ago, Craig Federroll, a small-business owner from Pasadena, found himself so heartsick that he couldn't sleep. He tossed and turned. His mind roamed. He decided he needed some kind of project to channel his grief. The father of two grade-schoolers, he thought of a tree fort. He'd grown up playing in them, after all, and the sawing might be good therapy. Two months later, he'd completed a structure like none his neighbors on the Magothy had ever seen: a four-story replica of a pirate ship, each level connected to the others by hatches and ladders, its crow's nest towering 40 feet above the riverbank.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
Amid a flurry of international flags, thunderous fireworks and rowdy pirates Tuesday, Baltimore invited the world to its star-spangled salute to the bicentennial of the War of 1812 that starts next week. State and local officials gathered to publicize Sailabration, a maritime and air festival that begins its six-day run in the city on June 13. The city will welcome 18 tall ships and dozens of Navy vessels to its harbor and all will be open for free tours throughout the festival. The Navy's celebrated Blue Angels will perform shows over Fort McHenry and numerous activities for all ages are scheduled throughout the city and at Glenn L. Martin Airport in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2002
An elaborate haunted house complete with a pirate ship and crew, a spooky maze and a skeleton version of the principal is the central attraction at tonight's Halloween festivities at the Columbia campus of Maryland School for the Deaf. The school is one of two state-funded campuses that serve Maryland's deaf and hard-of-hearing children. The other campus is in Frederick. The haunted house is a school tradition, and its details are a yearly surprise for the pupils, said Cheri Dowling, president of the school's Parent-Teacher-Counselor Association.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2000
From operating on Dwight D. Eisenhower's in-grown toenail to pirating in the Inner Harbor, Dr. John Charlton, 69, has led a uniformed, if not uniform, life. He was a young podiatrist in the Army when called upon to examine President Eisenhower, and eventually Charlton and his wife Gloria became good buddies with Mamie, Ike's wife. After the Army, Charlton donned clown's togs as a potentate in the Shriners. And now, he is Captain Hook, tour guide aboard the Peter Pan Pirate Ship Baltimore, an amphibious vehicle that takes tourists on Baltimore streets and in the harbor as part of a historic tour program run by the Living Classrooms Foundation.
FEATURES
By Rosemary Knower and Rosemary Knower,Special to The Sun | July 16, 1995
Near Bowie, south of Baltimore, is a green acre of magic. First you see the pirate ship, then you notice the space ship, and finally, you're captivated by the fort, the train and the airplane. Chances are, you'll also see pint-size pirates forcing the enemy to walk the plank. Screams of delight from the children compete with the sounds of the traffic zipping by on Route 301, and mostly conquer it. Scattered here and there, testing the love seats and gliders, peering into the miniature barns and sturdy sheds, are a lot of wistful-looking adults who'd be up on those castle lookout towers in a red-hot minute if their dignity would let them.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 24, 2013
Registration is open for The Children's Center of North Harford's 2013 Summer Adventures Program. Open to children ages 4 to 11, Summer Adventures is set to begin Monday, June 17 and offers 10 theme-based weeks of fun and learning. Weekly themes include The Rainforest, Prehistoric Times and Down on the Farm as well as many others. The program runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Before and after care are optional and run from 6:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. The Summer Adventures Program will be held in the newly renovated school-age classroom.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 16, 2012
The two guys behind Marvilent are hoping that Baltimoreans will want to break out of the weekend routines -- yard work, house cleaning or sitting at the bar all day -- and do something fun and active . Michael Lopez and his partner, Evan Klein, recently launched Marvilent.com , a web-based business where they organize adventure and social events, negotiate nice discounts, and pass on the savings to people looking for a good time....
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2010
The Brazilian warship has traveled around the globe the past quarter century, but it was pelted by pirates for the first time Sunday. The naval ship — a sort of floating classroom for Brazilian midshipmen — is spending a week in Baltimore as part of a tour that began in early June. It is docked near Harborplace, where costumed privateers and wenches on the city's pirate cruise sail by with taunts every hour or so. Throughout the week, the 420 Brazilian sailors are extending their gangplanks to visitors for free tours of the ship, The Brazil.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 16, 2012
The two guys behind Marvilent are hoping that Baltimoreans will want to break out of the weekend routines -- yard work, house cleaning or sitting at the bar all day -- and do something fun and active . Michael Lopez and his partner, Evan Klein, recently launched Marvilent.com , a web-based business where they organize adventure and social events, negotiate nice discounts, and pass on the savings to people looking for a good time....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
The crew of Urban Pirates has just a few simple expectations for the would-be Baltimore buccaneers it takes aboard for its adults-only, BYOG (bring your own grog) cruises: Participants are expected to make a lot of noise. They must defend the pirate ship with water cannons if it comes under "attack. " They should help finish off a bottle of rum, and they are encouraged to play pirate games. Disney's newest movie about Capt. Jack Sparrow might be rated PG-13. But the past few years have seen a proliferation of shipboard-themed events for the 21-and-older crowd.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
After his mother died suddenly 21/2 years ago, Craig Federroll, a small-business owner from Pasadena, found himself so heartsick that he couldn't sleep. He tossed and turned. His mind roamed. He decided he needed some kind of project to channel his grief. The father of two grade-schoolers, he thought of a tree fort. He'd grown up playing in them, after all, and the sawing might be good therapy. Two months later, he'd completed a structure like none his neighbors on the Magothy had ever seen: a four-story replica of a pirate ship, each level connected to the others by hatches and ladders, its crow's nest towering 40 feet above the riverbank.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2010
The Brazilian warship has traveled around the globe the past quarter century, but it was pelted by pirates for the first time Sunday. The naval ship — a sort of floating classroom for Brazilian midshipmen — is spending a week in Baltimore as part of a tour that began in early June. It is docked near Harborplace, where costumed privateers and wenches on the city's pirate cruise sail by with taunts every hour or so. Throughout the week, the 420 Brazilian sailors are extending their gangplanks to visitors for free tours of the ship, The Brazil.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | October 22, 2006
In the "If you've got it, flaunt it" department, Disney Cruise Line capitalizes on its exclusive movie franchise. Star-struck Mouseketeers of all ages can now get a live look-see at the Flying Dutchman, the ship made famous in Disney's latest flick Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, on the line's private Caribbean island, Castaway Cay. The film prop, with its barnacle-encrusted bow, flaunts ragged sails and imparts a bona fide look of haunting the...
SPORTS
By Compiled from interviews and other newspapers' reports | September 24, 2006
While Orioles fans grow continually disillusioned with the performance of their team and a faction has pleaded with owner Peter G. Angelos to sell the club, another maligned owner of a struggling franchise may very well jump ship this year. Kevin McClatchy, the Pittsburgh Pirates' chief executive officer and managing general partner, has been noncommittal on whether he will sell his control of the team, which just clinched its 14th straight losing season. "I've said that I'll comment on my situation after the season," McClatchy said.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 1997
BEAUFORT, N.C. -- Divers here have pulled barnacle-encrusted cannons and pewter dinner plates from the sandy offshore shallows, a bounty wrested from what they say was Blackbeard's pirate ship.To the people of this coastal boating village, the relics might as well be gold.Mayor Hunter Chadwick foresees new motels and restaurants jammed with wide-eyed tourists, eager to see the belongings of the seas' most notorious pirate. They would be whisked here on a four-lane highway connecting this isolated landing with the inland capital of Raleigh.
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II and THOMAS H. MAUGH II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 1, 2006
Underwater archaeologists have identified the partial remains of the youngest known pirate to ply U.S. waters, a 9-year-old boy who eagerly joined Capt. Black Sam Bellamy's crew on the infamous Whydah. Teen-age pirates were common during the early 18th century, but "this is the youngest one I have ever come across," historian Ken Kinkor of the Expedition Whydah Sea-Lab & Learning Center in Provincetown, Mass., said yesterday in announcing the discovery. The young pirate's idyll aboard the Whydah did not last long.
NEWS
By Dave Schleck and Dave Schleck,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 2003
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. -- Sea currents have tossed around pirate Blackbeard's flagship for nearly 300 years. But now the game is getting treacherous for the sunken Queen Anne's Revenge, according to research conducted by the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. The ocean's coy pursuit started in June 1718, when the heavily armed pirate ship ran aground in Beaufort Inlet about a mile off the coast of central North Carolina. The rest of the story is told centuries later by geologists like Jesse McNinch, a VIMS professor who recently returned from a research expedition studying the sandy bottom around the wreck.
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