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NEWS
By Staff Report | May 13, 1993
An 8-year-old Prince George's County boy's fish story has state Department of Natural Resources officials buzzing.Testing out his new fishing rod at the Allen Pond Park in Bowie Saturday, Michael McManus landed an 11-inch piranha, a flesh-eating fish native to South America.Since Saturday, DNR officials have received five other reports of piranha in the five-acre pond, including one much larger than Michael's, said DNR spokesman John Verrico.Michael's piranha, which is being kept on ice in a cooler by his family, is the only one that has been confirmed.
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By Janet Nickellejannickel@msn.com | July 1, 2011
The Springlake Piranhas swim team opened its season in Division II of the Central Maryland Swim League with a meet at Westminster Riding Club. While the Piranhas came up on the short end of the team score, a number of swimmers had great performances. For instance, Katie McComas set a new team record in the 13-14 girls 100-yard freestyle. A number of swimmers improved previous times by 10 seconds or more, led by Noah Williams, who improved more than 33 seconds in the 6-under boys 25-yard freestyle; and Ethan McKenna, who improved his 6-under boys 25-yard backstroke by more than 20 seconds.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | September 5, 1995
A 17-year-old high school senior from Dundalk caught an 18-inch fish in the Loch Raven Reservoir Sunday that state Natural Resource officials say may have been a piranha, but a National Aquarium spokesman said it was more likely a relative of the piranha.Neither type, according to the officials, would pose a threat to humans.Jason Taylorson of the 7600 block of Cedar Road caught the fish, which weighed 3 pounds, 1 ounce, about 10 a.m. Sunday while fishing for bass from the side of the reservoir near the boating pier.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | October 8, 2006
Readers who picked up the Sept. 27 edition of The Sun were greeted at the top of Page One with a blown-up photo of a very toothy fish accompanied by a provocative headline: "A piranha in Dundalk." The next day The Sun began receiving what eventually became a flood of reader e-mails claiming that the Page One piranha was all teeth and no bite - in fact, a red-bellied pacu, a vegetarian cousin of the meat-eating fish. The paper's editors were skeptical at first, because the fish in question had been identified as a piranha by biologists at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and at the National Aquarium in Washington.
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | June 9, 1993
Donald Warren is one lucky fisherman.Lucky because it's rare for a fisherman to discover, swinging at the end of his line, a fish that would as easily bite the fisherman as it would the bait.We're talking piranha, the carnivorous fish of the Amazon River.Last Wednesday was a fine day for fishing at Robert's Field. The pond at North Woods Trail and Boxwood Drive had been recently stocked with largemouth bass by the Department of Natural Resources.The pond had recently come under the management of Aquatic Environmental Consultants, hired by the Fields Homeowners Association to monitor the water and introduce plant life.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN REPORTER | September 27, 2006
Chew on this: A flesh-eating piranha was caught this week in a Dundalk park pond. Inches from the tall reeds along the shore of Stansbury Pond and just to the left of an abandoned beach ball, William Murphy landed a lean, mean, eating machine, 3 1/2 pounds and 16 inches long. There's probably only one piranha - probably an aquarium discard, experts say. But that's what they said about the northern snakehead, the alien critter that made the federal government's most-wanted fish list in 2002.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | May 14, 1993
In three hours, a handful of state fishery experts using specialized equipment failed yesterday to duplicate the achievement of a single, 8-year-old boy with a fishing pole: catch a piranha.Michael McManus of Bowie landed an 11-inch piranha Saturday at Allen Pond Park in Prince George's County. Yesterday morning, he and his father, Steve McManus, watched as state Department of Natural Resources biologists sent mild electrical shocks through the five-acre pond, causing stunned fish to float to the surface where they were examined.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | September 30, 2006
Call it a red herring. Or a pacu-lips now. Either way, it appears the fish caught at a Dundalk park pond last Sunday was a pacu, not a piranha. Both fish swim in the same fish family and are often mistaken for each other. Earlier this week, two biologists were fooled, as were several veteran fishermen. "I can understand the misidentification," said Tom Lorenz, an invasive species researcher at the University of New Orleans. "The red is similar on the body. A lot of people buy [pacu] thinking they've purchased piranha, and when they get too large, they throw them in local waters."
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | September 4, 1992
When Michael Vendemia found an 8 1/2 -inch red-bellied piranha in a crab pot with a Maryland blue crab this week, one of the feisty creatures was pretty badly bruised. And it wasn't the crab."I walked out there with a cup of coffee to check my pots, and there it was -- a fish in one of the pots fighting one of the crabs," said Mr. Vendemia, 42, who fishes off his back yard dock in Benedict, Charles County. "The fish had marks on him. The crab wasn't shaken up at all. He was running around."
SPORTS
January 17, 2003
The number 12 Consecutive home-court victories by Maryland against ACC opponents. He said it "It's an inferno. It's a piranha fish feeding frenzy." Pete Gillen, Virginia coach, on playing at Duke.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | September 30, 2006
Call it a red herring. Or a pacu-lips now. Either way, it appears the fish caught at a Dundalk park pond last Sunday was a pacu, not a piranha. Both fish swim in the same fish family and are often mistaken for each other. Earlier this week, two biologists were fooled, as were several veteran fishermen. "I can understand the misidentification," said Tom Lorenz, an invasive species researcher at the University of New Orleans. "The red is similar on the body. A lot of people buy [pacu] thinking they've purchased piranha, and when they get too large, they throw them in local waters."
NEWS
September 28, 2006
When William Murphy pulled a piranha out of Stans- bury Pond in Dundalk on Sunday, he was landing a fish that was apparently made famous in this country by none other than Teddy Roosevelt, who saw piranhas in action during a trip to the Amazon in 1914. Piranhas, in fact, normally don't go on the attack, but "normally don't" is not the same as "don't ever," and their ferocious reputation is well deserved. The former president, who had prided himself on being a fighter in the public arena, couldn't help but be impressed by the way the relatively small piranha went after much bigger game, and almost always won. He went home and wrote a book about his adventure.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | September 28, 2006
Opening night in the first city of a national tour would be enough pressure for most actors. But at the press opening of The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee last week at the Hippodrome Theatre, "so many things went wrong that it sort of felt that we were haunted," says Jennifer Simard, who found herself alone on stage winging it when the sound board crashed at the start of the show. Luckily, Simard, who plays the host of the bee, had a couple of things going for her. The musical includes audience interaction and improvisation (though hardly as much as Simard wound up doing that night)
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN REPORTER | September 27, 2006
Chew on this: A flesh-eating piranha was caught this week in a Dundalk park pond. Inches from the tall reeds along the shore of Stansbury Pond and just to the left of an abandoned beach ball, William Murphy landed a lean, mean, eating machine, 3 1/2 pounds and 16 inches long. There's probably only one piranha - probably an aquarium discard, experts say. But that's what they said about the northern snakehead, the alien critter that made the federal government's most-wanted fish list in 2002.
TRAVEL
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and By Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
Perhaps I'd seen too much James Bond or watched too many National Geographic specials, but I expected the piranhas circling our fishing boat to thrash at the bait, not nip it off the hook to avoid being reeled in. I was fishing deep in the Amazon, being schooled by flesh-eating fish. The piranhas were hungry. For three hours, they had feasted on our bait of raw chicken. But they weren't brutish. They had nimbly picked the meat clean off my hooks. As storm clouds gathered overhead and lightning crackled in the distance, time to catch one was running out. When I felt a slight tug on my line, I responded with the gentlest of jerks.
SPORTS
January 17, 2003
The number 12 Consecutive home-court victories by Maryland against ACC opponents. He said it "It's an inferno. It's a piranha fish feeding frenzy." Pete Gillen, Virginia coach, on playing at Duke.
NEWS
September 28, 2006
When William Murphy pulled a piranha out of Stans- bury Pond in Dundalk on Sunday, he was landing a fish that was apparently made famous in this country by none other than Teddy Roosevelt, who saw piranhas in action during a trip to the Amazon in 1914. Piranhas, in fact, normally don't go on the attack, but "normally don't" is not the same as "don't ever," and their ferocious reputation is well deserved. The former president, who had prided himself on being a fighter in the public arena, couldn't help but be impressed by the way the relatively small piranha went after much bigger game, and almost always won. He went home and wrote a book about his adventure.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | October 8, 2006
Readers who picked up the Sept. 27 edition of The Sun were greeted at the top of Page One with a blown-up photo of a very toothy fish accompanied by a provocative headline: "A piranha in Dundalk." The next day The Sun began receiving what eventually became a flood of reader e-mails claiming that the Page One piranha was all teeth and no bite - in fact, a red-bellied pacu, a vegetarian cousin of the meat-eating fish. The paper's editors were skeptical at first, because the fish in question had been identified as a piranha by biologists at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and at the National Aquarium in Washington.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | September 5, 1995
A 17-year-old high school senior from Dundalk caught an 18-inch fish in the Loch Raven Reservoir Sunday that state Natural Resource officials say may have been a piranha, but a National Aquarium spokesman said it was more likely a relative of the piranha.Neither type, according to the officials, would pose a threat to humans.Jason Taylorson of the 7600 block of Cedar Road caught the fish, which weighed 3 pounds, 1 ounce, about 10 a.m. Sunday while fishing for bass from the side of the reservoir near the boating pier.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | August 20, 1995
If you're looking for a vacation travel destination that blends excitement with huge amounts of corn, I strongly recommend Iowa. I recently spent a few days there, and I can honestly say that it was comparable to experiences I have had in sophisticated prestige travel destinations such as Paris, France, the sense that I was not once engulfed by hog manure.I was concerned about this, however. The second day I was in Iowa, the top story on the front page of the Des Moines Register was headlined:Thousands of Fish Killed by Manure SpillThe story stated that a leak in a storage basin at a major hog farm had resulted in "a mammoth hog manure spill," estimated at 1.5 million gallons.
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