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By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
A Windsor Mill man, a former NASA employee, has pleaded guilty in Delaware federal court to buying more than a million dollars' worth of pirated software from black-market Chinese vendors who themselves were indicted Wednesday in federal court in Delaware, said the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, or ICE. Cosburn Wedderburn, 38, described as a former NASA employee by federal authorities, recently pleaded guilty to conspiracy to...
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NEWS
By Dave Gilmore | May 11, 2012
News Roundup •••• "Minecraft's" release on Xbox Live has gone about as well as anyone could have hoped. Early sales figures project that the game sold over 400,000 copies in the first day it was available. [ Major Nelson ] •••• Beyoncé is being sued for $100 million by game developer Gate Five for abruptly backing out of a deal for a game called “Starpower: Beyoncé.” It appears as though Gate Five was having trouble securing financing, and when Beyoncé walked it had to lay off 70 employees.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 29, 2000
Piracy in Pennsylvania Carl Schurr, the Baltimore-based artistic director of Totem Pole Playhouse, has wanted to produce a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta at the summer theater for years. He's finally getting his chance with "The Pirates of Penzance," which opens there Wednesday. Robert Randle stars as Frederic, the pirate apprentice, under the direction of Broadway actress and director Pamela Sousa. Here's the rest of the 50th anniversary season at the Fayetteville, Pa., theater: "Papa Is All," a Pennsylvania-Dutch comedy by Patterson Greene, July 18-30; "Deathtrap," a thriller by Ira Levin, Aug. 1-13; and "A Tuna Christmas," the further adventures of the denizens of the fictitious third-smallest town in Texas, by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard, Aug. 15-27.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
A Windsor Mill man, a former NASA employee, has pleaded guilty in Delaware federal court to buying more than a million dollars' worth of pirated software from black-market Chinese vendors who themselves were indicted Wednesday in federal court in Delaware, said the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, or ICE. Cosburn Wedderburn, 38, described as a former NASA employee by federal authorities, recently pleaded guilty to conspiracy to...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Nelson Schwartz and Michael Dresser and Nelson Schwartz,Sun Staff Writers | April 9, 1994
To the prosecution, Massachusetts Institute of Technology student David LaMacchia was the captain of an electronic pirate ship that sailed the globe in search of software programs to plunder.To the defense, the 20-year-old Marylander is "among the best and brightest in society" -- a "typical MIT whiz kid" who is being prosecuted for the crimes of others in an attempt to strike terror into the hearts of all who run computer bulletin boards.As the courts decide, the whole wired world will be watching.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alex Pham and Alex Pham,THE BOSTON GLOBE | July 31, 2000
Music and movies aren't the only things being pirated and distributed over the Internet these days. Video games also are big targets. Sega of America said last week that it has shut down 60 Web sites and 125 auctions trafficking in pirated video games played on Sega's Dreamcast console. Software pirating has existed for as long as software has been around. What's new is the unprecedented ease brought by the Internet for pirating and distributing software, leading to a crop of new applications such as DivX, which can be used to copy movies.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 2003
Some of the world's biggest record companies, facing rampant online piracy, are quietly financing the development and testing of software programs that would sabotage the computers and Internet connections of people who download pirated music, according to industry executives. The record companies are being presented options on new countermeasures, of varying degrees of legality, to deter online theft: from attacking personal Internet connections, so as to slow or halt the downloading of pirated music, to overwhelming the distribution networks with potentially malicious programs that masquerade as music files.
NEWS
October 2, 2008
They don't wear bandannas and eye-patches any more, though at first glance there's something almost comical about the Somali pirates who hijacked a Ukrainian freighter last week, apparently unaware it was carrying Russian-made tanks. With no way of getting their booty ashore, they've been stuck at sea ever since, surrounded by U.S. warships. Call it poor planning. But there's nothing funny about the resurgence of piracy, which has exploded in recent years with the growth of the shipping industry.
NEWS
By Matt Zapotosky and Jenna Johnson and Matt Zapotosky and Jenna Johnson,Washington Post | April 10, 2009
At least 14 of the 20 officers and crew aboard the U.S. container ship hijacked by Somali pirates in the Indian Ocean Wednesday attended union-run maritime schools in Maryland, and many received classroom training on how to handle a pirate or terrorist attack, school and union officials said Thursday. Nine of the twelve members of the Seafarers International Union who were aboard the Maersk Alabama attended the union's maritime school in the St. Mary's County town of Piney Point, the school's education director said.
BUSINESS
By Joseph Menn and Jon Healey and Joseph Menn and Jon Healey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2003
Two years after music industry lawyers pounded Napster Inc. into submission, the major record companies are pointing fingers at each other over the flourishing of online music piracy. Universal Music Group, EMI Music and a cadre of publishers blame Bertelsmann AG, saying the German media giant abetted copyright infringement by supporting Napster financially in 2000 and 2001. Bertelsmann says its accusers are at least partly responsible because they missed the chance to turn Napster's song-stealing users into paying customers.
NEWS
By Stephen A. Cox | December 19, 2011
For nearly 100 years, the Better Business Bureau has helped consumers avoid fraud and scams by helping them find businesses, brands and charities they can trust. We are uniquely positioned in representing both the interests of the business community, which supports our work, and the interests of consumers, who benefit from our efforts. The BBB logo is one of the most recognized symbols in America, and we work hard to prevent its abuse from those who use our name and logo to perpetrate fraud against consumers.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | December 16, 2009
I've just come from Cambridge, that beehive of brilliance, where nerds don't feel self-conscious: There's always someone nerdier nearby. If you are the World's Leading Authority on the mating habits of the jabberwock beetle of the Lesser Jujube Archipelago, you can take comfort in knowing that the pinch-faced drone next to you at Starbucks may be the W.L.A. on 17th-century Huguenot hymnody or a niche of quantum physics that is understood by nobody but himself. People in Cambridge learn to be wary of brilliance, having seen geniuses in the throes of deep thought step into potholes and disappear.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes , gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore County video game developer agreed to pay $75,000 in a settlement after it was accused by an industry trade group of using illegal copies of commercial software products. The Business Software Alliance, which represents the commercial software industry, alleged that Hunt Valley-based BreakAway Ltd., which makes video games for entertainment and training for businesses and the military, and footwear company Aetrex Worldwide Inc. used unlicensed copies of Microsoft and Adobe software.
NEWS
By Elijah E. Cummings | August 10, 2009
Piracy in the waters around the Horn of Africa continues to be a vexing problem for international shipping. The ultimate solution to piracy in this region will involve the establishment of an effective government in Somalia that is capable of ensuring the rule of law in that country. However, while initiatives are undertaken to support that crucial objective, American merchant mariners continue to sail in harm's way. As chairman of the Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation, I have carefully studied the issue of piracy in the waters around the Horn of Africa and the ongoing threat it poses to U.S. merchant mariners and American shipping interests.
NEWS
April 17, 2009
I wholeheartedly approve of the way President Barack Obama handled the pirate hostage situation ("Shots end crisis," April 13). I heard some talking heads on Fox News chastising him for calling out the U.S. Navy to deal with this situation. That's hogwash. U.S. maritime interests require the freedom of the seas, and the president, through the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard, has a duty and a responsibility to protect those interests whenever and wherever they are threatened. I find it ironic that some of the same people who glorified the invasion of foreign countries in the name of somewhat questionable U.S. interests (in Iraq, Nicaragua, etc.)
NEWS
By Matt Zapotosky and Jenna Johnson and Matt Zapotosky and Jenna Johnson,Washington Post | April 10, 2009
At least 14 of the 20 officers and crew aboard the U.S. container ship hijacked by Somali pirates in the Indian Ocean Wednesday attended union-run maritime schools in Maryland, and many received classroom training on how to handle a pirate or terrorist attack, school and union officials said Thursday. Nine of the twelve members of the Seafarers International Union who were aboard the Maersk Alabama attended the union's maritime school in the St. Mary's County town of Piney Point, the school's education director said.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | October 21, 2007
When the recording industry's legal team sued Jammie Thomas, a single mother of two in Minnesota for allegedly pirating music over the Internet from her home computer, it relied on intelligence gathered by a small Baltimore-area company that has built itself into the digital sleuth of the entertainment world: SafeNet Inc. With the ability to track down computers around the world that have illegally downloaded the latest George Clooney movie or Britney Spears...
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2000
A watchdog group has sounded a gong in Baltimore: Come clean about pirated software, and we'll spare you the cumbersome audit and crippling fine. The Business Software Alliance, a trade group that represents Microsoft, Adobe, Corel and other large software companies, is giving businesses in Baltimore, Phoenix, Cincinnati and Austin, Texas, until Nov. 30 to review their software licenses. BSA will not punish businesses for unlicensed software used before then if the companies comply with the truce.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
On a day he described as "not too hot, calm seas," Navy Cmdr. Stephen F. Murphy surveyed the sparkling water ahead of his ship, the guided missile destroyer USS Mahan, as it embarked on aggressive anti-pirate operations launched this week by the U.S. Navy. Murphy, a Catonsville native and Naval Academy graduate, is patrolling the Gulf of Aden, a million square miles of water squeezed between the coast of Somalia and the Arabian Peninsula. Each year 26,000 merchant ships and oil tankers traverse this vital sea lane of global commerce.
NEWS
November 20, 2008
It was an unabashed attack on the high seas that delivered an extraordinary bounty - $100 million worth of crude oil. But the Somali pirates who hijacked a Saudi Arabia-owned supertanker off the coast of Kenya over the weekend - and later seized two freighters in the Gulf of Aden and defied an Indian navy vessel sent to intercept them - have shown a brazenness that should chill commercial shipowners. Combating piracy at sea has become a matter of international urgency that will require a coordinated response on many fronts.
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