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Letter to The Aegis | June 21, 2012
The following letter was addressed to Del. Rick Impallaria. A copy was provided for publication. I am writing to you today to bring to your attention an issue you might already be aware of and one that I need your help monitoring. Columbia Gas has proposed the installation of a 21.4-mile natural gas pipeline from Owings Mills to Rutledge Compressor Station in Fallston. For most of the 21.4 miles, the pipeline will follow [an] existing pipeline, however, most of the pipeline being installed in the Fallston area will follow a new direction.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
A federal judge ruled this week that owners of multiple Harford County properties - where portions of a 21-mile underground gas pipeline are being installed under an eminent domain claim - cannot fully access funds set aside by the gas company as a form of collateral until a final determination is made at trial on compensation. Columbia Gas Transmission LLC was granted access to the properties in June to begin installing a back-up gas line between Owings Mills and Fallston under condition that it file a cash bond payment of $231,675 to the court, according to court records.
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NEWS
January 20, 2012
Kudos to President Obama for his courageous decision to deny a permit for the Keystone XL pipeline. As a former resident of Colorado, I can vouch for the fact that the Ogallala Aquifer that would have been threatened by the pipeline is a crucial source of drinking and agricultural water for much of the Midwest. Keystone I, built several years ago, has had a long and sad history of accidents and spills. With this decision, millions of future Americans will be spared a legacy of pollution.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
Your editorial, "Breaking a vicious cycle" (July 14) hits the nail on the head. With U.S. youth incarceration rates the highest in the world - greater than the rates of the other 10 most developed countries combined - something is tragically wrong. It is disturbing that once incarcerated as a youth, even for less serious offenses, these individuals have an increased likelihood of returning to prison and a decreased chance of securing gainful employment later in life. As you point out, the Youth PROMISE Act offers a more effective approach to juvenile crime.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 9, 2012
Some of those environmental activists campaigning against the Keystone XL pipeline are on the young side.  Kids from 20 Maryland high schools, who dub themselves the Tar Sands Students, plan to meet today with a representative of the White House Council on Environmental Quality to press their concerns about construction of the line to carry oil extracted from tar sands deposits in western Canada to refineries in the Gulf of Mexico....
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | June 5, 2012
Editor: Time is running out for you to make your feelings known to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the proposed 21.4 mile, 26 inch, 1000 PSI pipeline that will wind its way through Baltimore and Harford Counties. Harford County politicians need to take their heads out of the sand and see the potential problems this pipeline will create to our wetlands, septic systems, environment and safety. The gas company has one 20-nch pipeline already in place. Why do we need another?
EXPLORE
December 6, 2011
Prince George's County Public Schools has been awarded a one-year $250,000 grant from the Freddie Mac Foundation. This capacity-building grant will be used to enhance funding for the "principal pipeline" initiative that began this school year through a $12.5 million five-year grant from the Wallace Foundation. The Freddie Mac Foundation grant will enhance sustainability of the initiative and support the school system in its efforts to increase the effectiveness of instructional leaders.
NEWS
August 30, 2011
Of course, the representative of the American Petroleum Institute would promote a tar sands oil pipeline from Canada to the U.S. ("Keystone XL pipeline is a step toward the future," Aug. 25). Unfortunately, this is not, as the headline says, "a step toward the future," but is a step backward. Why? Because fossil fuels are no longer viable long-term sources of energy. Neither Cindy Schild nor the op-ed writers opposed to the pipeline mention the broader issue, which is that we are past the peak of cheap oil. Oil executives and politicians know this but don't talk about it. (See the film, "The End of Suburbia.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | July 17, 2013
I'm walking from Camp David to the White House starting Friday - 100 miles in the July heat. I'm doing this to honor the 19 firefighters who died fighting a wildfire near Prescott, Ariz., on June 30. These men died particularly horrifying deaths doing particularly heroic deeds. I'm also walking to honor the 50 men and women who died during the oil tanker train explosion this month in Lac-Megantic, Canada. My eight-day walk - joined by scores of other Marylanders and citizens from around the nation - will serve to memorialize these people as victims of tragically interconnected factors.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
Environmental activists warn that construction of a 21-mile natural gas pipeline through northern Baltimore and Harford counties could affect the region's drinking-water system, as the $180 million project cuts across more than three dozen streams feeding into Loch Raven Reservoir. Theaux Le Gardeur, executive director of the Gunpowder Riverkeeper, has petitioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to reconsider its approval of the pipeline last month and order a more detailed review of the project's environmental effects.
NEWS
July 11, 2014
For far too many young people who get caught up in the criminal justice system, an arrest or conviction for even a minor, non-violent offense can become a one-way ticket to a shrunken future that slams the door on opportunities for the rest of their lives. Being arrested as a teen increases a person's chances of being arrested again as an adult, and teenagers sentenced to jail are more likely to be incarcerated later in life as well. Add to that the nation's harsh drug laws and stiff mandatory minimum sentencing policies and it's no wonder America locks up more of its citizens than any other country in the world.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
State and federal officials announced Friday they were providing $8 million to pipe clean public water to 270 homes near Salisbury where a toxic solvent has contaminated the ground water supplying residential wells there. Authorities installed water filtration systems in 2012 on 40 homes in the Morris Mill area that were discovered to have high levels of trichloroethylene. Another 18 homes with lower but still elevated levels have been supplied bottled water. Officials say they don't know who dumped the solvent there, but believe it is not continuing.
NEWS
By John K. Delaney | April 2, 2014
In the context of Russia's invasion of Ukraine and a still stagnant economy, President Barack Obama faces two important questions on energy transmission: a decision on the construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline and the question of increasing American natural gas exports. These are choices that will resonate from Crimea to Cove Point. In my judgment, the president should reject Keystone and step up natural gas exports. Here's why. The right analytical framework for these decisions has several component questions: what's consistent with our environmental and energy policy objectives, what's in our economic self-interest, and what serves our geopolitical goals.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
A West Virginia-based gas company is suing dozens of landowners in Baltimore and Harford counties to gain use of portions of their properties for a $180 million pipeline project. In three federal lawsuits filed since January, Columbia Gas Transmission seeks to invoke eminent domain to obtain temporary or permanent easements on more than 400 acres for its 21-mile pipeline extension. The project, which gained approval from federal regulators last November, has sparked concern among neighbors about safety, environmental issues and property values.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Dunbar coach Lawrence Smith knows which William Crest moment is his favorite. Crest, the Dunbar quarterback, had already scored two rushing touchdowns against City this past October when the Poets faced a fourth-and-9 from the Knights' 12-yard line, trailing 26-22. The call with 12.4 seconds remaining was a pass, but the senior saw an opening to the left and darted down the sideline, stopping only after his outstretched arms toppled the front pylon of the end zone for the game-winning score.
NEWS
By Louise Vest | January 13, 2014
January 1965 Vroom vroom Used car ads in the Times: " '62 Studebaker, V-8, automatic, 4 Door Sedan: $895; 1961 Dodge, Very clean, 8-cylinder, auto trans, many extras: $895; 1961 Chrysler, 2-door hardtop with automatic transmission, power steering: $1295; '59 Oldsmobile 4-door hardtop, auto transmission, 8 cylinder, Good condition: $695. " "Transco Names Ferguson: Tyler A. Ferguson has been named superintendent of pipeline construction for the Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corporation, E. Clyde McGraw, president has announced.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
Your editorial, "Breaking a vicious cycle" (July 14) hits the nail on the head. With U.S. youth incarceration rates the highest in the world - greater than the rates of the other 10 most developed countries combined - something is tragically wrong. It is disturbing that once incarcerated as a youth, even for less serious offenses, these individuals have an increased likelihood of returning to prison and a decreased chance of securing gainful employment later in life. As you point out, the Youth PROMISE Act offers a more effective approach to juvenile crime.
NEWS
January 7, 2014
Thank you for Tim Wheeler 's article on opposition to the construction of a new natural gas pipeline because of the effects it may have on local water supplies ("Pipeline may affect drinking water, activists fear," Jan. 1). There are other reasons to oppose the building of this pipeline. Natural gas is popular because it is inexpensive and promoted as burning cleaner than coal. However, when one factors in the greenhouse gas effects of methane leaks during drilling and transportation, it may not be cleaner than coal.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
Environmental activists warn that construction of a 21-mile natural gas pipeline through northern Baltimore and Harford counties could affect the region's drinking-water system, as the $180 million project cuts across more than three dozen streams feeding into Loch Raven Reservoir. Theaux Le Gardeur, executive director of the Gunpowder Riverkeeper, has petitioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to reconsider its approval of the pipeline last month and order a more detailed review of the project's environmental effects.
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