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Pipe Dream

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NEWS
March 12, 1992
When plans for the Christopher Columbus Center of Marine Research and Exploration were made public this week, the dramatic ribbed roof reminded some observers of a sea creature. But the design is no more dramatic than the dream behind this project -- or its importance for Baltimore.In part because of the pioneering efforts of the University of Maryland's Rita Colwell, the United States enjoys a lead in marine biotechnology, a field with enormous economic development potential. Dr. Colwell heads the Maryland Biotechnology Institute, which includes the Center of Marine Biology (COMB)
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NEWS
April 30, 2012
I get it that The Sun is no longer a Baltimore-based company but rather a part of one of America's media giants. But since the paper is still about Baltimore, I think the American League standings in the Sports section could at least express a little hometown pride. In a recent edition, for example, both the New York Yankees and Tampa Bay were listed above the Orioles, even though their stats were identical, right down to the respective teams' winning percentages. Just for the record, Toronto also had the same exact record.
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FEATURES
By J.L. Conklin and J.L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | February 1, 1994
The 21-foot high scaffolding that dominated Towson State University's Stephens Hall Theater's stage this weekend was as much a performer as the Boston Dance Collective (BDC), the dance troupe that performed "Pipe Dream."The structure -- an amalgamation of scaffolds, ladders and pipes fitted together -- created an environment in which the six dancers rolled, swung, hung, climbed over and supported each other as they maneuvered their way to the top. It seemed to change as the relationships of the dancers shifted; mazes, cubicles, cages, and apartments could be imagined.
SPORTS
By Teddy Greenstein and Tribune reporter | April 8, 2010
What passed for a juicy storyline last year was whether Masters officials had sapped all the joy from Augusta National with the addition of trees, a second cut of rough and 400-plus yards. Turns out, they hadn't. Chad Campbell, for one, played his first 16 holes in 9-under-par. This year's top storyline does not involve alleged Tiger Woods mistresses named Jamie and Jaimee or Rachel and Raychel. Not directly, anyway. But the major question heading into today's opening round is simple: How will Woods play?
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 1, 1991
New York--Maybe it is a pipe dream.Television hasn't had a successful variety program since -- well, since "The Carol Burnett Show," and here's Carol trying to launch a successful variety program. At least it has a proven name."The Carol Burnett Show" premieres at 9 tonight on CBS (Channel 11), 13 years after the network closed it the first time. The time slot is hardly the best. The network has had a hard time drawing flies Fridays. It has banished its new 8-to-9 p.m. shows -- "Brooklyn Bridge" to Wednesdays and "Princesses" to nowhere -- naming no permanent replacements.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1996
Before Anne Arundel and Howard counties get their own regional airport at Fort Meade, the Army is going to have blow up a lot more things.Demolitions experts have blown up at least 429 mortars, shells and other pieces of metal buried at Fort Meade's Tipton Airfield, which the two counties hope to take over. But, as Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker said yesterday, neither county is moving too quickly.County officials want to make sure all unexploded shells and all three landfills on the site are cleaned up. Mr. Ecker spoke of a Jan. 1 opening date for the airport but acknowledged, "That may be a pipe dream."
NEWS
October 22, 1990
When plans for a building world center for marine research in the Inner Harbor first surfaced, the notion of such an ambitious, multi-faceted project seemed like a fanciful pipe dream. But Baltimore's Inner Harbor has seen other dreams become reality, and with last week's news of congressional approval of $10 million in federal funds for 1991, plans are moving ahead to begin construction next fall on the Christopher Columbus Center of Marine Research and Exploration.The federal appropriations are a testament to the effective work of Maryland's congressional delegation, especially on the part of Sen. Barbara Mikulski and Rep. Steny Hoyer.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | October 10, 1990
In the days before Bugle Boy jeans and blue mohawks, long before Pacman was the new kid on the block, troops of youths in tie-dyed shirts cruised Harundale Mall just like the teenyboppers of today.Drawn by the chance to window shop, score a date or just hang out, groups of teen-agers gathered every day inside the first enclosed mall east of the Mississippi.Irritated shoppers and store owners soon complained about the invasion of "longhairs," leading the mall developer, James W. Rouse, to suggest setting aside some space for a youth recreation center.
NEWS
April 30, 2012
I get it that The Sun is no longer a Baltimore-based company but rather a part of one of America's media giants. But since the paper is still about Baltimore, I think the American League standings in the Sports section could at least express a little hometown pride. In a recent edition, for example, both the New York Yankees and Tampa Bay were listed above the Orioles, even though their stats were identical, right down to the respective teams' winning percentages. Just for the record, Toronto also had the same exact record.
NEWS
February 11, 1994
Although NATO has put itself in a hair-trigger position to start dropping bombs on Bosnia, the United States can still avoid military intervention if a long-needed switch in administration strategy produces results. For the first time since he took office, President Clinton has come out strongly for partition and has made it clear the U.S. will no longer encourage the Bosnian Muslims to keep fighting for more territory.It was this change in the American position that enabled NATO to set a 10-day deadline for the withdrawal of heavy Bosnian Serb military equipment from the mountains surrounding Sarajevo.
NEWS
By Erica Goldman | July 3, 2008
Near the Interstate 95 on-ramp just beneath the intersection of Bush and Russell streets in Baltimore, the outfall of Pipe 263 inspires little optimism. Trash bobs in sickly green water. Plastic bags hang from drooping trees on the riverbank. Here, stormwater flows untreated from a 72-block underground watershed, a network of storm drains that channels water beneath the streets of West Baltimore into the Patapsco River and into Baltimore Harbor beyond. Ultimately, this dirty water ---- laden with organic matter, toxics, nitrogen and phosphorus ---- heads for the Chesapeake Bay. Aboveground feels pretty bleak too. Abandoned houses checkerboard the 12 neighborhoods that make up Watershed 263, defined by the hydrology of underground pipes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | June 29, 2008
What do you know about Marcellus shale, a sedimentary bedrock that underlies much of the Appalachian Basin, including Maryland's westernmost counties, and why should you care? I didn't know anything about the black shale that was deposited about 400 million years ago during the Devonian period until the other day, when I was talking with a few Maryland geologists. In an 1839 report, Marcellus Shales in Seneca County, James Hall of the New York State Geological Society named the shale after an outcropping of it was discovered near Marcellus, N.Y. The reason Marcellus shale is important in this energy-conscious age is that it may well harbor about 500 trillion cubic feet of untapped natural gas, according to Terry Englander, a geoscience professor at Pennsylvania State University, and Gary Lash, a geology professor at the State University of New York at Fredonia.
FEATURES
By John Anderson | September 14, 2007
The girl of your dreams -- and his dreams and her dreams -- the punkish heroine of Satoshi Kon's Paprika, is a double-agent-provocateur in a shape-shifting movie of marvelous, baffling complexities. It's a long way from the work of that Japanese Walt Disney, Hayao Miyazaki (Spirited Away). And it is also anime decidedly for adults: Among Paprika's thriller aspects, noirish angst and futuristic action, nothing is ever what it appears. Dreams intrude on dreams. Surfaces of reality fold over each other, like the petals on an origami chrysanthemum.
BUSINESS
By Charles Jaffe and Charles Jaffe,MarketWatch | May 29, 2007
The mutual fund business is the proverbial camel, the one that was supposed to be a horse until it was built by committee. It is filled with arcane rules and procedures that can make funds perform more like beasts of burden than thoroughbreds. And while investors have worked their way over the hump and have successfully used mutual funds to reach their financial goals, it's hard not to wonder how the business could be improved. That's what made a recent book, Competitive Equity: A Better Way to Organize Mutual Funds, such a compelling story for investors.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 21, 2006
Talk about your bells and whistles. With 6,938 pipes and 32 tons worth of structure and equipment, the $6.4 million organ unveiled at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia can do just about anything. Outgun the Philadelphia Orchestra, for one. This baby can crank up the volume to bone-tingling effect. Don't be surprised if folks in Jersey start complaining about unexplained vibrations. The range of the sounds produced by this instrument is startling, too. It extends from the lowest possible note, which the organ builders jokingly describe as a "tuned helicopter," to the snazzy "bell star" - made up of 15 handbells struck by a rotating arm - located way up in the left corner of the huge facade of exposed pipes above the stage.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2003
Their day started on a chilly picket line, where every blast of a horn and wave of support from truck drivers and motorists speeding past elicited a roar of approval from the crowd. Within three hours yesterday, however, the parents of northern Carroll County had something else to cheer. Two property owners, including the family that runs the golf course whose entrance was staked out in protest, agreed to allow sewer lines to be laid across their properties - clearing the last obstacles to an $18.2 million renovation of North Carroll Middle School that was supposed to have begun last fall.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | August 8, 1995
NEW YORK -- In the first inning, Mike Mussina threw strike three past Wade Boggs. Then he threw another strike three past Paul O'Neill."I turned around to see if lights were flashing behind me or something," Mussina said. "Like it was the Twilight Zone or something."His stuff was that good last night at Yankee Stadium in what was probably the biggest game of the year for the Orioles."I had great stuff, really great stuff," Mussina said. "The best stuff I've had in a long while."Even before that was the case, the Orioles all but had to beat the Yankees last night.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 9, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Ever since World War II, when German scientists developed V-2 rockets that terrorized London, and especially since the first ballistic missiles capable of delivering nuclear devices across the oceans, security of civilian population centers has been a major Pentagon concern. In the early 1960s, the Puzzle Palace across the Potomac aggressively urged Americans to build their own fallout shelters. As a reporter there at the time with three small kids, I slapped one together in my basement that probably could not have withstood the huffs and puffs of the Big Bad Wolf.
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