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Pinto Beans

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NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2002
Laura Cunninghame of White Hall requested a recipe for bean pie that she had heard was popular in the Baltimore City area. "My neighbor told me about the pie, which she does not have a recipe for. Would appreciate your help." Jean Pierce of Fayetteville, N.C., responded. "I look forward to reading your recipes in our newspaper. I saw this week where someone is hunting for a bean-pie recipe. My family likes this one." Pinto-Bean Pie Serves 8 to 12 4 eggs 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup mashed pinto beans, leaving a few beans whole 1/2 cup margarine 1 pie shell pecan halves, for garnish Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
Karen Blood from Center Point, Iowa, was looking for a recipe for chili that she said was once printed on the wrapper of Aldi's brand canned tomatoes. She said the "healthy and nutritional" chili contained pinto beans, kidney beans, green pepper, celery and canned tomatoes and she would like to be able to make it again. She contacted the Aldi company about the recipe but they were unable to help her. I also searched the Aldi website, which contained many good recipes, but unfortunately there were none for chili as she described it. Danielle Adler from Austin, Texas, saw Blood's request and sent in her favorite chili recipe that she thought sounded like it had everything Blood was looking for. She said she frequently makes this when she knows she is going to have friends over to watch football, and because it is made in a slow cooker she can make it in the morning and forget about it the rest of the day. Using a slow cooker to make chili makes perfect sense.
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NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2001
Opened in February, Baja Fresh Mexican Grill defies easy categorization. It is anything but Tex-Mex. "We call it `California Mexican,'" says Jorge Castro, general manager of Baja Fresh. "It's American-style Mexican food." With a few silk palm trees and a crisp black-and-white decor, the restaurant does invoke a modern Mexico or California atmosphere - according to Castro, purposely eons away from the rustic Mexican plazas common to other Mexican restaurants. Although the prompt, cafeteria-style service is similar to that at fast-food restaurants, "food cannot be made at microwave speed," a sign warns.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | July 11, 2007
Baked beans are an all-American summer standby. Although a recipe for classic baked beans is simple - dried beans, water, salt, dry mustard, molasses, brown sugar and salt pork - that last ingredient typically sends the fat and sodium levels through the roof. Jean Anderson, author of The Nutrition Bible, estimates a serving of baked beans has nearly 400 calories, 13 grams of fat and more than 1,000 milligrams of sodium. This recipe for Picnic Beans makes several substitutions for the sake of nutrition and convenience.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | February 27, 1991
CANNED PINTO BEANS are featured in this update of a classic lasagna dish. This meatless main dish makes enough to feed a crowd. Instead of layering the lasagna noodles, you simply spread them with a savory filling of the beans plus broccoli and ricotta cheese. Roll them up, top with tomato sauce and bake.Canned beans, an excellent source of complex carbohydrates, are precooked so they don't need the long soaking and cooking times necessary with packaged dry beans.This recipe is from The Pillsbury Co.Vegetable Lasagna Roll-ups12 uncooked lasagna noodlesSauce:1 15.5-ounce can pinto beans, drained1 15-ounce can tomato sauce1 14 1/2 -ounce can Italian style stewed tomatoes, undrained1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried basil leavesFilling:1 15-ounce carton part-skim ricotta cheese1 15.5-ounce can pinto beans, drained1 cup chopped frozen broccoli cuts, thawed and well drained1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried basil leaves2 garlic cloves, minced1 onion, finely choppedTopping:1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella cheeseHeat oven to 375 degrees.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | March 15, 1995
This simple, 15-minute chili actually has a green tint given by the green salsa which is available in many supermarkets these days. Verde, (pronounced vare-day), means green in Spanish and it is also the name given to Mexican-style stews that are based on the green tomatillo and green chilies rather than the red tomato and red chilies. A verde often uses pork as the meat. If desired, take the theme a little further and, instead of using red meat, use a mild poultry such as ground turkey or ground chicken.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | March 3, 1993
Packing a lunch for work or school can be a challenge. A steady stream of sandwiches becomes tedious and frozen microwave entrees even more so. But many people still resort to brown bag lunches several times a week as a respite from fast-food or costly restaurant visits. And it is easier to control the quality of foods that you assemble at home.Here are three unconventional recipes that you won't often find in brown bags. But they fill the requisites: They're easy to make, they pack well and they're simple to heat in a microwave oven.
NEWS
August 2, 2002
Joel Oliansky, 66, a writer-director who won two Emmys for his work on The Senator and The Law, died Monday in Los Angeles. His directing credits include episodes of the TV series Emergency, Kojak, Quincy, Bring 'Em Back Alive and Alfred Hitchcock Presents. His script for the 1970 TV program The Senator earned him an Emmy. He also wrote the TV miniseries The Law, starring Judd Hirsch, which won him another Emmy as well as Writers Guild and Humanitas awards. He directed two films, The Competition, starring Richard Dreyfuss, in 1980, and In Defense of a Married Man in 1990.
FEATURES
By Mary Carroll and Mary Carroll,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 6, 1993
Creating low-fat recipes that tasted rich and satisfying was the challenge I took on when hired as a chef for a heart-disease-research study in the 1980s. Here's one of my first assignments: Could I make an Italian pasta sauce that would satisfy a Sicilian grandmother, have it ready in 30 minutes, and use no olive oil?After five inedible tomato sauces even the dog wouldn't eat, I hit upon the secret: Substitute a small amount of simmering sherry, wine or broth for the oil.The sweetest substitute for oil in a saute is dry cocktail sherry or fruit juice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 23, 2001
"FRESH" AND "fast food" are not words that often appear in the same sentence. But there's a newcomer in town that's serving fresh food pretty darn fast. The newcomer is Baja Fresh Mexican Grill, and it's part of a chain based in California. Since the first Baja debuted in 1990, the privately held company has opened more than 100 restaurants in 12 states and the District of Columbia. In the Baltimore area, there are two - in Columbia and Hunt Valley. Baja touts its dedication to freshness in big, bold letters splashed across the walls above the open kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 19, 2004
Chipotle Mexican Grill has a limited menu. It sells burritos (tortillas stuffed with meat, beans, salsa, cheese and sour cream), fajita burritos (same thing but with peppers and onions instead of beans), burrito salads (same thing, but without the tortilla), and tacos (smaller flour or corn tortillas, stuffed with meat, salsa, sour cream and lettuce). For sides, there are chips, salsa and guacamole. I've got nothing against a restaurant that focuses on a few items, as long as every item is really, really good.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | January 12, 2003
By the time mid-January rolls around, everyone I know is feeling a bit blue. I call it the post-holiday- doldrums syndrome. Houses look bare with all the Christmas decorations put away, the weather is cold, the days often gray and, worst of all, bills have started to arrive. My remedy for this seasonal condition is to sit down, plan a menu of my favorite comfort foods and invite a few friends for a meal. Such get- togethers warm souls and lift spirits. For this January, I've decided on a barbecued meat loaf (made with a homemade barbecue sauce)
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2002
Laura Cunninghame of White Hall requested a recipe for bean pie that she had heard was popular in the Baltimore City area. "My neighbor told me about the pie, which she does not have a recipe for. Would appreciate your help." Jean Pierce of Fayetteville, N.C., responded. "I look forward to reading your recipes in our newspaper. I saw this week where someone is hunting for a bean-pie recipe. My family likes this one." Pinto-Bean Pie Serves 8 to 12 4 eggs 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup mashed pinto beans, leaving a few beans whole 1/2 cup margarine 1 pie shell pecan halves, for garnish Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
NEWS
August 2, 2002
Joel Oliansky, 66, a writer-director who won two Emmys for his work on The Senator and The Law, died Monday in Los Angeles. His directing credits include episodes of the TV series Emergency, Kojak, Quincy, Bring 'Em Back Alive and Alfred Hitchcock Presents. His script for the 1970 TV program The Senator earned him an Emmy. He also wrote the TV miniseries The Law, starring Judd Hirsch, which won him another Emmy as well as Writers Guild and Humanitas awards. He directed two films, The Competition, starring Richard Dreyfuss, in 1980, and In Defense of a Married Man in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 23, 2001
"FRESH" AND "fast food" are not words that often appear in the same sentence. But there's a newcomer in town that's serving fresh food pretty darn fast. The newcomer is Baja Fresh Mexican Grill, and it's part of a chain based in California. Since the first Baja debuted in 1990, the privately held company has opened more than 100 restaurants in 12 states and the District of Columbia. In the Baltimore area, there are two - in Columbia and Hunt Valley. Baja touts its dedication to freshness in big, bold letters splashed across the walls above the open kitchen.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2001
Opened in February, Baja Fresh Mexican Grill defies easy categorization. It is anything but Tex-Mex. "We call it `California Mexican,'" says Jorge Castro, general manager of Baja Fresh. "It's American-style Mexican food." With a few silk palm trees and a crisp black-and-white decor, the restaurant does invoke a modern Mexico or California atmosphere - according to Castro, purposely eons away from the rustic Mexican plazas common to other Mexican restaurants. Although the prompt, cafeteria-style service is similar to that at fast-food restaurants, "food cannot be made at microwave speed," a sign warns.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
Karen Blood from Center Point, Iowa, was looking for a recipe for chili that she said was once printed on the wrapper of Aldi's brand canned tomatoes. She said the "healthy and nutritional" chili contained pinto beans, kidney beans, green pepper, celery and canned tomatoes and she would like to be able to make it again. She contacted the Aldi company about the recipe but they were unable to help her. I also searched the Aldi website, which contained many good recipes, but unfortunately there were none for chili as she described it. Danielle Adler from Austin, Texas, saw Blood's request and sent in her favorite chili recipe that she thought sounded like it had everything Blood was looking for. She said she frequently makes this when she knows she is going to have friends over to watch football, and because it is made in a slow cooker she can make it in the morning and forget about it the rest of the day. Using a slow cooker to make chili makes perfect sense.
FEATURES
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | June 7, 1998
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick but worthy of...
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | September 19, 1999
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost- cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick.Sunday/FamilyPrepare a turkey breast in your smoker or try a store-bought one today.
FEATURES
By Jenn Williams and Jenn Williams,contributing writer | February 17, 1999
Whether it's midmorning, late afternoon or evening, most people don't think twice about indulging in a quick snack to quell their hunger pangs. Candy bars, chips, ice cream -- pretty much anything will do the trick.What happens, though, when you live in a country like India, where, according to Catholic Relief Services, 52.5 percent of the population lives in poverty and only 63 percent has access to potable water? Instead of reaching for ice cream or a candy bar, people there rely on staples, such as spinach, lentils and naan, an unleavened bread, to quell their hunger.
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