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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 25, 1992
He had the whole world in his hands -- the whole world, that is, of Pinocchio, including Gepetto, Jiminy Cricket, the Blue Fairy, and even bad old Monstro the whale. He had it in his hands because that's the way you fix an old movie: You run it through the projector of your fingertips, feeling for flaws, for fissures and cracks and accumulations of grit, all the banal little catastrophes that can destroy it.And, tomorrow, when the immaculate, bright and nearly pristine "Pinocchio" opens on a thousand screens looking even newer than it looked in 1940, the world will get to judge how well Peter Comandini did his job.Mr.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Anna Eisenberg | September 15, 2005
Clifford on stage Children's favorite oversized canine stars in Clifford the Big Red Dog LIVE! at the Hippodrome Theatre tomorrow and Saturday. Clifford joins his friends -- adored favorites such as Emily Elizabeth, Cleo and T-Bone -- on stage to present a charming new story created for his first live tour. The audience will sing along while learning lessons about friendship and teamwork. Performances are at 7 p.m. tomorrow and at 11 a.m., 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. Tickets cost $28 and are available at the Hippodrome Theatre box office or any Ticketmaster outlet.
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FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1996
It would be a lie to say "The New Adventures of Pinocchio" isn't a stunning technological achievement.Live action flirts with fantasy in the newest take on the classic tale. The latest in high-tech puppetry, provided in part by Jim Henson's Creature Shop, and an army of artists went into creating Pinocchio and his friends and bringing them to life on the screen. Pinocchio, voiced by "Home Improvement's" Jonathan Taylor Thomas, blends marvelously into scenes where he is surrounded by people and dense surroundings, but a little TTC less convincing in scenes without constantly moving reference points.
NEWS
June 18, 2004
Children invited to participate in `Pinocchio' At Theatre on the Hill, children can be a part of the show. The first of two children's plays this season is Carlo Collodi's classic tale of Pinocchio, about the live puppet that wants to be a real boy. This production is an adaptation by Brian Way of the original tale, written as a series of stories from 1881 to 1882 and published as a book in 1883. Viewer participation includes offering suggestions to the characters and joining the characters onstage.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | February 7, 1993
"Pinocchio" came to Westminster yesterday, warming nearly 1,500 chilled Carroll residents with an adaptation of the classic story and summer dreams of Ocean City.To thank the thousands of families who make the resort part of their summer vacation plans, Ocean City officials have sent Parker Productions Inc. on tour through Maryland and southern Pennsylvania. Westminster High School was among the tour's stops."We're here to thank you," said "Prospector Parker," known offstage as Bill Wills, who with his wife, Sue, runs Parker Productions at the Carousel Hotel in Ocean City.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 1998
Children's Theatre of Annapolis, which gives local youngsters a chance to try out their acting talent, has mounted a production of "Pinocchio" that has much to recommend it, including imaginative sets, great costumes and some fine performances.This production of the Richard Wade, Dick Gessner version of Carlo Collodi's classic 1883 story of a puppet has 31 acting, singing and dancing children ranging in age from 8 to 15.There's Erin Kelly, who stars as Pinocchio with fine acting and puppetlike movements that seem totally natural; Meghan Bradshaw, a fabulous Fox, also natural and wonderfully adept at moving with comic grace, and Meghan Taylor, who is just as good as the fox's Cat partner.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 26, 1992
In 1940, not only the screen was square. So was America.Thus it's something of an astonishment to discover what degree of savvy lurks in the 50-year-old and newly restored "Pinocchio."This wonderful little movie seems as prescient as "Network" in some of its acute observations about the ways of youth.The leading man may be a trifle wooden, and he may be lost in some painterly Mitteleuropean version of an Italian alpine village as envisioned by nine old white men in an air-conditioned studio in Burbank, Calif.
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 2002
When you wish upon a star, makes no difference where you are. Unless, that is, you're at Roberto Benigni's wooden new Pinocchio. That's one place you don't want to be. The Miramax film opened Christmas Day without being screened for critics, a bad sign on so many levels. And the film lives up - or, rather, down - to the expectations of this peek-a-boo marketing strategy. The puppet may finally come to life, but the movie never does. Speaking of expectations: Nobody expected this live-action Pinocchio to equal the 1940 Disney version, the best Disney animated feature ever made and one of the best films of any kind.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 26, 1992
In 1940, not only the screen was square. So was America.Thus it's something of an astonishment to discover what degree of savvy lurks in the more than 50-year-old and newly-restored "Pinocchio."This wonderful little movie seems as prescient as "Network" in some of its acute observations about the ways of youth. The leading man may be a trifle wooden and he may be lost in some painterly Mitteleuropean version of an Italian alpine village as envisioned by nine old white men in an air-conditioned studio in Burbank, California, the year before Pearl Harbor, but the temptations he fell prey to are as vivid as today.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 25, 1992
He had the whole world in his hands -- the whole world, that is, of Pinocchio, including Gepetto, Jiminy Cricket, the Blue Fairy, and even bad old Monstro the whale. He had it in his hands because that's the way you fix an old movie: you run it through the projector of your fingertips, feeling for flaws, for fissures and cracks and accumulations of grit, all the banal little catastrophes that can destroy it.And, tomorrow, when the immaculate, bright and nearly pristine "Pinocchio" opens on a thousand screens looking even newer than it looked in 1940, the world will get to judge how well Peter Comandini did his job.Mr.
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 2002
When you wish upon a star, makes no difference where you are. Unless, that is, you're at Roberto Benigni's wooden new Pinocchio. That's one place you don't want to be. The Miramax film opened Christmas Day without being screened for critics, a bad sign on so many levels. And the film lives up - or, rather, down - to the expectations of this peek-a-boo marketing strategy. The puppet may finally come to life, but the movie never does. Speaking of expectations: Nobody expected this live-action Pinocchio to equal the 1940 Disney version, the best Disney animated feature ever made and one of the best films of any kind.
NEWS
August 15, 2000
Gibson McCabe, 89, publisher and president of Newsweek for almost 25 years, died Aug. 5 of a heart attack. Mr. McCabe, who lived in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., died at a hospital in nearby Jacksonville Beach. Raymond P. Broderick, 86, a U.S. district judge whose 1977 ruling closed the Pennhurst State School and Hospital in Pennsylvania, affecting thousands of mentally disabled people, died of cancer Aug. 4 in Gladwyne, Pa. In another decision, the devout Roman Catholic barred Philadelphia from spending tax money in 1979 to build a platform for Pope John Paul II to celebrate Mass during a visit to the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Coffren and John Coffren,Special to the Sun | August 8, 1999
When the call came in March 1995, Sara Maitland thought it was a prank. The voice on the other end of the line introduced himself as film director Stanley Kubrick, and asked, "Would you like to write a film script for me?""He rang me, no warning," the British author recalls. "I called up my agent and said, 'What do you mean giving up my private phone?' "But the call and offer were both genuine. The next day a contract arrived, beginning Maitland's yearlong adventure as the screenwriter for "A.I."
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff | January 17, 1999
Vigen Guroian, a theologian and ethicist who teaches at Loyola College in Maryland, has read the important tomes by the authorities in his field. He has even written a couple of them.But to his mind, one of the best sources of moral wisdom lies in the classic fairy tales read to us when we were children.Not the sanitized Disney versions, mind you. But classics like the stories by the Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid," and the story of the wooden puppet who wanted to become a real boy, "Pinocchio."
NEWS
January 3, 1999
''If you like ponies, you'll want to read 'The Mud Pony' by Carol Lee Cohen. This story is about a boy who wants a pony of his own. He makes a mud pony and puts it in the sand. He goes back to his Indian camp and sees that no one is there. You've got to read the rest of this story to find out what happens to the boy and his mud pony.''- Devan MarkowitzLisbon Elementary``My favorite book is 'Pinocchio.' It's about a woodcutter who made a puppet and one night the woodcutter saw a wishing star and made a wish that Pinocchio could be a real boy. The fairy came.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 1998
Children's Theatre of Annapolis, which gives local youngsters a chance to try out their acting talent, has mounted a production of "Pinocchio" that has much to recommend it, including imaginative sets, great costumes and some fine performances.This production of the Richard Wade, Dick Gessner version of Carlo Collodi's classic 1883 story of a puppet has 31 acting, singing and dancing children ranging in age from 8 to 15.There's Erin Kelly, who stars as Pinocchio with fine acting and puppetlike movements that seem totally natural; Meghan Bradshaw, a fabulous Fox, also natural and wonderfully adept at moving with comic grace, and Meghan Taylor, who is just as good as the fox's Cat partner.
FEATURES
By Shel Silverstein | May 10, 1998
Noise DayLet's have one day for girls and boysesWhen you can make the grandest noises.Screech, scream, holler, and yell -Buzz a buzzer, clang a bell,Sneeze ` hiccup ` whistle ` shout,hTC Laugh until your lungs wear out,Toot a whistle, kick a can,Bang a spoon against a pan,Sing, yodel, bellow, hum,Blow a horn, beat a drum,Rattle a window, slam a door,Scrape a rake across the floor,Use a drill, drive a nail,Turn the hose on the garbage pail,Shout Yahoo -...
NEWS
January 3, 1999
''If you like ponies, you'll want to read 'The Mud Pony' by Carol Lee Cohen. This story is about a boy who wants a pony of his own. He makes a mud pony and puts it in the sand. He goes back to his Indian camp and sees that no one is there. You've got to read the rest of this story to find out what happens to the boy and his mud pony.''- Devan MarkowitzLisbon Elementary``My favorite book is 'Pinocchio.' It's about a woodcutter who made a puppet and one night the woodcutter saw a wishing star and made a wish that Pinocchio could be a real boy. The fairy came.
FEATURES
By Shel Silverstein | May 10, 1998
Noise DayLet's have one day for girls and boysesWhen you can make the grandest noises.Screech, scream, holler, and yell -Buzz a buzzer, clang a bell,Sneeze ` hiccup ` whistle ` shout,hTC Laugh until your lungs wear out,Toot a whistle, kick a can,Bang a spoon against a pan,Sing, yodel, bellow, hum,Blow a horn, beat a drum,Rattle a window, slam a door,Scrape a rake across the floor,Use a drill, drive a nail,Turn the hose on the garbage pail,Shout Yahoo -...
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