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SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
They're back. Score's premium Pinnacle line makes a timely debut in baseball -- during the season.It's in fashionable black as were Pinnacle football and hockey, but it presents a contrast to Score's pastel regular baseball line.Unlike the football and hockey cards, the baseball Pinnacles have only an action picture on the front instead of the action shot sharing space with a head shot. It presents a more powerful image and is similar to Score baseball in having bats, balls and arms moving out of the picture block into the border.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | August 27, 2012
"Madden NFL 13" EA Sports Xbox 360/PlayStation 3 Score: 3 stars out of 4 The "Madden" series hasn't quite lived up to expectations since eliminating competing NFL franchises in 2005. Still, it is taken for granted how much EA Sports maximizes its exclusive license with the NFL to produce video games that allow fans to come as close as most ever will to an NFL field. The knock on “Madden” is that it's the same year-in and year-out. “Madden NFL 13” absolutely disproves that notion, though “different” doesn't automatically mean “better.” Like it's little brother, “NCAA Football,” this year's edition of “Madden” has fine-tuned its passing game to mirror the throw-happy offenses in the real NFL. Receivers run their routes in a less robotic fashion than previous editions, and as a quarterback, the player has a real opportunity to put the ball where they want.
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SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | February 7, 1993
Pitchers and catchers, with 12 days until they report, may have begun to think about packing. But it's midseason for baseball cards.Collectors can add Upper Deck, Pinnacle and Fleer Series 2 to their score cards.Score is bringing its mid-priced Pinnacle line back for a second season. The first series, 310 cards, will be available this month and the second series in June.Preview cards have strong action shots from games of players as you think of them -- Deion Sanders running the bases, John Kruk getting ready to make contact, Cal Eldred coming over the top. The color scheme is still basic black, and subsets and insert sets abound.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | October 4, 2011
Howard County boasts a plenitude of nonprofit organizations and charitable agencies. Howard Magazine highlights who they are, what they do and how you can help. Name: Pinnacle Empowerment Center Who: Heather Comstock, Executive Director Q:    What is your mission? A:    Pinnacle Empowerment Center provides career and life coaching to women who are in need of support and guidance as they navigate changes in their lives. (The center) provides women in transition customized career and life management services and resources needed for lifelong success.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | December 22, 1991
Score, whose innovative designs have helped set the direction for late-century trading cards, is entering the premium market.Next month, it will introduce a 415-card football set under the Pinnacle name. Adopting what has become a premium-card trademark, Pinnacle will have an anti-counterfeiting device, an imprint on the bottom border of card backs that will be visible only through a special lens.Player cards feature a black background on a white border with a head shot and an action shot on the front.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | February 16, 1992
As expected, Score will be extending its premium Pinnacle line to hockey and baseball cards, spokeswoman Julie Haddon confirmed last week.According to Haddon, Score expects to ship its Pinnacle hockey in late March. It will consist of 420 cards and will come in English and French versions. Details will be released later this month at a large card show in Montreal."We have plans to issue Pinnacle baseball," Haddon said, "but we have no date."The first Pinnacle issue was an NFL set, which came out in early winter.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2002
John Gotti, who swaggered, schemed and murdered his way to the pinnacle of organized crime in America only to be toppled by secret FBI tapes and a turncoat mobster's testimony, died of cancer in a prison hospital in Springfield, Mo., yesterday while serving a life sentence. He was 61. Traditional Mafia leaders led publicity-shy lives. Not so Gotti, who reveled in media attention as the boss of the nation's largest and most influential organized crime group, the Gambino family. He cut a swashbuckling figure in New York City, wining and dining with show business celebrities in elegant restaurants and nightspots, surrounded by bodyguards.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff | April 13, 1999
Hamilton Smith never imagined himself trying to answer biology's grandest question.For more than 30 years, he'd been content to study bacteria, hunching over colonies of germs. He left it to others to tease out the secrets in the twisted, tangled and nearly endless coils of human DNA.Hidden there are the answers to the central mysteries of biology and medicine -- how we grow up and grow old, fall ill and get well, how genes influence our instincts and intellects. Inscribed in our DNA is the saga of 4 billion years of evolution and the story of mankind's dispersal across the Earth.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2005
It's common for people who can afford it to hire a wealth manager. So why not a health manager? That's the premise behind Pinnacle Care International, a Baltimore company that reports rapid growth in the newly developing business of patient advocacy. Pinnacle advises families on doctors and hospitals that are likely to give them the best care, but also arranges appointments, fills out paperwork and sometimes even accompanies patients. From time to time, it coordinates with a member's chef on healthful menus and with his personal trainer on an exercise plan.
SPORTS
By Alex Kopicki and Alex Kopicki,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2002
Andy Zianio of Glen Burnie compares his swing to that of Happy Gilmore, the golfer in the 1996 film comedy starring Adam Sandler. "It actually works," says Zianio, describing the unusual stroke. "You can hit it farther. I can take a baseball step and swing." Regardless of Zianio's trick-shot talents, he used a traditional swing to win the Long Island Pinnacle Distance Challenge on June 15. Zianio's 327-yard strike won him $10,000 and a trip to Nevada, where he will compete in the finals of the Pinnacle Tournament.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | June 4, 2008
After years of delay, Baltimore is moving to allow a prominent developer to build two residential towers along Key Highway - renewing community concerns about the future of the peninsula's vanishing waterfront. If the City Council approves the zoning change, HarborView developer Richard A. Swirnow would be permitted to build a 26-story tower and could also proceed on an adjacent 17-story building west of the high-rise already on the site. City officials say the proposed design is the best they have seen because it maintains better views of the water for surrounding residents and includes first-floor shopping to enliven Key Highway.
SPORTS
By Patrick Gutierrez and Patrick Gutierrez,Sun reporter | October 17, 2007
The walls at Meadowbrook Aquatic Center in Mount Washington are adorned with poster-sized portraits of past and future champions who cut their competitive teeth there. But while the record-breaking performances of world-class athletes such as Michael Phelps and Katie Hoff garner most of the swimming facility's attention, another Meadowbrook member recently enjoyed his moment in the spotlight. Phil Wetzler, 69, a longtime volunteer coach who has dedicated much of his life to working with people with disabilities, was chosen by Team USA to serve as an assistant aquatics coach during the Special Olympics World Summer Games in Shanghai, China, which concluded Thursday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 12, 2007
SHENZHEN, China -- At least 20,000 police surveillance cameras are being installed along streets in southern China and will soon be guided by sophisticated computer software from an American-financed company to automatically recognize the faces of police suspects and detect unusual activity. The program will start this month in a port neighborhood and then spread across Shenzhen, a city of 12.4 million people. Most citizens will also be issued a residency card fitted with a powerful computer chip programmed by the same company.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,Los Angeles Times | June 15, 2007
Kurt Waldheim, the erudite diplomat who served as U.N. secretary-general and Austria's president but left the world stage a pariah after his Nazi past was exposed, died yesterday. He was 88. Austrian state media said Mr. Waldheim, who was hospitalized last month with an infection, died of heart failure in Vienna. The case that defined the legacy and memory of the longtime diplomat was built around a grainy black-and-white photograph that showed a young Mr. Waldheim - tall, lean and uniformed - as he fought for a Nazi army unit blamed for wartime atrocities in the Balkans.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Tribune Media Services | May 6, 2007
As she watches the Florida real estate market soften around her, Susie Hurst is getting nervous. The 59-year-old former teacher had thought that rental income from several properties she had accumulated over the years would finance her retirement. But higher insurance costs (the result of hurricanes), taxes and upkeep expenses have turned her cash flow to negative of late. She recently took out a home-equity line to cover the shortfall and is considering going back to work. She also is thinking about selling some of her $1.5 million real estate empire, which consists of a four-unit apartment building, a duplex and a small home adjacent to her own residence in Orlando.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | March 31, 2007
TERRE HAUTE, Ind.-- --Today, just thinking about the prom photos makes Jimmy Smith laugh. His son and Greg Oden, all dressed up in white tuxedos with those handsome black hats, making exaggerated faces for the camera. Even though Oden had moved away to Indianapolis before his eighth-grade year, he returned to town last May and attended senior prom at Terre Haute South High, where his best friend, Travis Smith, went to school. The two had been friends since the fourth grade and in their final weeks of high school, they had a plan: Oden would someday soon become a professional basketball player and Smith a pro golfer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2003
Could you recommend a special video card to copy some videotapes onto CD-Rs? Do I need other hardware? It's getting ever more easy to pump video into computers, and once you've done it, your idea of personal computing will be changed forever. So I recommend that folks first get their feet damp with an ultra-simple USB video input device before shelling out money and time opening up the computer case and installing a video card. Recently, I reviewed a nice one of these, the $70 Linx package from Pinnacle Systems Inc. (www.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington | December 18, 2003
If you want to import video and work on it on your PC, the Pinnacle Systems Movie Box DV ($250; a Universal Serial Bus version is available for $200) is a dream to use. Our efforts to work with digital video on a PC have prompted our friends who have Macintoshes to urge us to go buy an Apple machine. We don't need to do that because Movie Box uses FireWire technology - which means you'll still need to have a FireWire port or add one with an expansion card - to quickly connect your PC to your video camera or videocassette recorder and pull in video.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | December 7, 2006
While I was watching LaDainian Tomlinson put together another incandescent performance Sunday, it occurred to me that we're smack in the middle of a golden age for brilliant fantasy seasons. Some columnists have suggested that Tomlinson is having the greatest fantasy year ever. I say let him finish before we anoint it as such. But he's certainly in the argument with 1,794 rushing and receiving yards and 26 touchdowns (plus two passing scores) through 12 games. Tomlinson has been so great that pretty much any team he's on is playoff-bound.
SPORTS
June 22, 2006
Bruce Springsteen was blaring through the speakers. "Come on up for the rising," the Boss crooned. And in the middle of a packed Dallas hotel ballroom early yesterday morning, Pat Riley, sore hip and all, danced with joy. That was the song played in the Miami Heat's home arena just before tip-off of every NBA Finals game, a song Riley referenced often around his team, part of the never-ending motivational ploys that, at long last, carried the Heat to...
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