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Piney Run Park

NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 2, 2003
Faced with increasing opposition from residents and animal rights groups, Carroll County officials have called off plans to reduce the beaver population at Piney Run Park in Sykesville. Less than a week after the county's plan to use underwater traps to kill beavers at the park's lake became public, officials canceled the hunt. "We are re-evaluating the situation and will not do the trapping in January," Richard Soisson, the county director of recreation and parks, said Friday. "We want more information on alternatives."
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
Faced with increasing opposition from residents and animal rights groups, Carroll County officials have called off plans to reduce the beaver population at Piney Run Park in Sykesville. Less than a week after the county's plan to use underwater traps to kill beavers at the park's lake became public, officials said they were canceling the hunt and looking for other methods to manage the rodents' effect on the forest. "We are re-evaluating the situation and will not do the trapping in January," Richard Soisson, the county director of recreation and parks, said Friday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
Until a few years ago, towering oak and hickory trees with thick branches projecting over the water grew all along the shores of Piney Run Lake in Sykesville. But, now, in many lake coves, barren patches of ground, dotted with pointed stumps, wood chips and half-gnawed trees, have replaced the forest. A growing population of beavers that favor the largest and most valuable trees in Piney Run Park bear the brunt of the blame for the changed look of the forest, said Loren W. Lustig, the park manager.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
Until a few years ago, towering oak and hickory trees with thick branches projecting over the water grew all along the shores of Piney Run Lake in Sykesville. But, now, in many lake coves, barren patches of ground, dotted with pointed stumps, wood chips and half-gnawed trees, have replaced the forest. A growing population of beavers that favor the largest and most valuable trees in Piney Run Park bear the brunt of the blame for the changed look of the forest, said Loren W. Lustig, the park manager.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
Until a few years ago, towering oak and hickory trees with thick branches projecting over the water grew all along the shores of Piney Run Lake in Sykesville. But, now, in many lake coves, barren patches of ground, dotted with pointed stumps, wood chips and half-gnawed trees, have replaced the forest. A growing population of beavers that favor the largest and most valuable trees in Piney Run Park bear the brunt of the blame for the changed look of the forest, said Loren W. Lustig, the park manager.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 1, 2002
WITH THE HELP of beautiful fall weather, Piney Run Park Apple Festival drew a record crowd of about 2,200 during the weekend. Volunteers headed to the park early Saturday with flags decorated with red apples flying from their vehicles to attract visitors. The volunteers had made all the preparations in the preceding weeks for the park fund-raiser. Naturalist Elaine Sweitzer arrived early to set up her Early American cooking demonstration. She was dressed in period garb, and prepared ham and bean soup, Indian pumpkin bread, apple cobbler and a recipe called "Bubble and Squeak" over an open fire.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2001
ALEXANDRA LEBEDINSKAYA of Vladivostok, Russia, recently visited Piney Run Park as part of an exchange program to learn about state and national parks in the United States. Her hometown, a Pacific seaport village and major naval base, is nearly on the opposite side of the globe. Lebedinskaya was one of 10 business entrepreneurs from Vladivostok and Siberia participating in a Community Connections Program funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, and the Baltimore/Washington Corridor Chamber Foundation.
NEWS
August 21, 2001
Piney Run Park will offer children's nature programs - "Mother Nature, Mom and Me" and "Babes in the Woods" - beginning next month. Children will learn about nature through hands-on activities, crafts, songs and stories. Each session is 45 minutes long and is devoted to a different topic each month. The cost is $10 for children of members, and $12 for children of nonmembers. "Mother Nature, Mom and Me," for ages 4 to 5, will be offered at 10 a.m., 11:15 a.m. and 1 p.m. one day a week, Sept.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2001
The Carroll County commissioners are about to receive more than 3,000 signatures from residents opposed to construction of a $14 million water treatment plant at Piney Run Reservoir in Sykesville. But the petitions have no legal standing and probably will not sway the decision to build the plant - which two commissioners have chosen as the means to augment the water supply in populous South Carroll. "People have a democratic right to let the commissioners know how they feel, but these petitions are not legally binding and do not trigger any process such as a referendum," said Laurell Taylor, county attorney.
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