Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPinehurst
IN THE NEWS

Pinehurst

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 28, 1991
Services for Virginia Curtis Devilbiss will be held at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the Mitchell-Wiedefeld Home, 6500 York Road.Mrs. Devilbiss, who was 86 and lived in Pinehurst, died yesterday at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center after a heart attack Saturday.Her husband, William O. Devilbiss, a retired civil engineer, died in 1977.Born in Baltimore, the former Virginia Curtis was a graduate of Western High School and of Ithaca College in Ithaca, N.Y.She is survived by two sons, William O. Devilbiss Jr. of Glenarm and Robert C. Devilbiss of Baltimore; a sister, Mildred Curtis Hedeman of Baltimore; and two grandchildren.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | June 5, 2009
Joseph F. Welsh Jr., a retired official of the Baltimore office of investment bankers Merrill Lynch and a World War II veteran, died of pneumonia Monday at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 84 and had lived in the Pinehurst/Cedarcroft neighborhood for many years. The Northeast Baltimore native attended Shrine of the Little Flower Parochial School and won a scholarship to Mount St. Joseph High School. At 16, he left school to support his three younger brothers after the death of their mother.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1994
PINEHURST, N.C. -- Leave it to Lee Trevino to put Pinehurst No. 2 in its proper golf course perspective.Reminded he had spoken glowingly of the Donald Ross creation earlier in the week, professional golf's resident jokester and chatterbox was asked what, in his mind, made it so special."
NEWS
October 21, 2007
On October 16, 2007, W. CLIFFORD DAWSON, SR.; beloved husband of the late Alice Neser "Peggy" Dawson; dear father of William C. Dawson, Jr. and his wife, Betty, Jacqueline E. Dawson and her husband, Steven D. Wyman; dear grandfather of Andrew, Anthony and Gregory Dawson, Matthew, Kendall and Tyler Wyman; devoted great-grandfather of Logan Dawson. Private Graveside Services. The family will receive friends from 3 to 8 p.m. on Monday, October 22nd, at 6303 Pinehurst Road. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Stella Maris Women's Auxiliary, 2300 Dulaney Valley Road, Timonium, MD 21093.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | June 26, 1994
The recollections came flooding back to Perky Cullinane after he became one of the area qualifiers for this week's U.S. Senior Open, to be played over the No. 2 Course at Pinehurst (N.C.) Country Club.Cullinane, 59, from Chevy Chase and Columbia Country Club, recalled standing in the 18th fairway during the fourth round of the 1962 U.S. Amateur at the same Pinehurst course facing a big decision.Cullinane was clinging to a 1-up lead over E. Harvie Ward Jr.For that week, it wasn't just the Harvie Ward of the San Francisco Golf Club, or Harvie Ward, with championship credentials that included two U.S. Amateurs, a British Amateur and a Canadian Amateur.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1999
PINEHURST, N.C. -- Imagine, if you will, the scene here come Sunday should Tiger Woods walk up the 18th fairway on the famed Pinehurst No. 2 course, a three-shot lead on the scoreboard and his first U.S. Open in his pocket.Now try to picture what it would be like if Colin Montgomerie of Scotland finds himself in the same position, the long-suffering and often-blustering bridesmaid finally claiming his first major championship.And here's a third scenario: Greg Norman, his shoulder healed and his confidence revived from his runner-up finish at the Masters, grabbing hold of the Open demons he has chased since losing in a playoff to Fuzzy Zoeller 15 years ago.The 99th U.S. Open begins this morning with these scenarios -- and many more, given the nature of the Donald Ross course and soggy conditions -- being played out over the next four (or five)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
PINEHURST N.C.-- Years from now, perhaps when the U.S. Open returns to Pinehurst No. 2, they will talk about what happened this week in the same way they talk about what happened at Winged Foot a quarter-century ago.With one significant difference: the players will speak of reverence for this hallowed course rather than revile the way the USGA tricked up Winged Foot back when Hale Irwin won at 7-over par.They also might recall something else -- the first...
FEATURES
By David R. Rosenthal and David R. Rosenthal,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1996
PINEHURST, N.C. -- I'm standing on the first hole of Donald Ross' masterpiece, the No. 2 course at Pinehurst, one of America's best and site of the 1999 U.S. Open. Judging by the bunker guarding the right side of the green, I can bring the shot home with a 4-iron, get down in two putts and walk away with a par.The iron shot is up, on line -- and, I see when I reach the green's fringe -- about 10 yards short.Touche, Mr. Ross.The Scot, who designed No. 2 and tinkered with it over several decades, imparted a graceful challenge to the course.
SPORTS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1999
When they tee it up at Pinehurst No. 2 tomorrow, they'll be playing from what we used to call "one foot in the woods" -- as far back as you can get on this punishing layout.Growing up in Pinehurst in a decade too distant to mention, I saw some of the world's best players -- Ben Hogan and Sam Snead, Terrible Tommy Bolt, Mike Souchak and Jimmy Demaret (who had my father's red hair and the same-shaped face). The best of the British players were there for the Ryder Cup in the 1950s.Jack Nicklaus came to town occasionally and hit balls past the trees at the far end of the driving range, a place of torment for many aptly named Maniac Hill.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2005
PINEHURST, N.C. - Trying to re-create perfection is usually difficult, whether it's a college football team going after an unbeaten season or a concert pianist going for another mesmerizing performance. The United States Golf Association can attest to that. After hosting what many thought was the perfect U.S. Open a decade ago at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, the USGA was widely criticized after the final round last year. Going into the 105th U.S. Open, which begins today at the Pinehurst Resort and Country Club, the USGA is hoping that the same kind of praise that was heaped on the renowned No. 2 course in 1999 will be there again.
NEWS
August 17, 2007
Helen T. Johnston, a homemaker and former private-school board member, died Tuesday of cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Pinehurst resident was 78. The former Helen Toulson was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. She was a 1946 graduate of Roland Park Country School and earned a bachelor's degree in French from Russell Sage College. Mrs. Johnston, a longtime Pinehurst resident, had served on the board of Roland Park Country School for many years. She enjoyed reading, playing bridge and spending time at a second home in Eastville, Va. She often opened the historic 17th-century home for Virginia Garden Club tours.
SPORTS
By HEATHER A. DINICH | July 23, 2007
Here are some odds 'n' ends from the posh Pinehurst Resort, where the media spent three hours interviewing Atlantic Coast Conference football players yesterday. We'll get to that eventually, but here's what the Maryland contingent is up to: Andrew Crummey acknowledges that he can't golf well but won't turn down a chance to play at Pinehurst. Christian Varner said he sneaked out to the driving range - twice - to work on his game before the players, coaches and some media tee off this morning on Pinehurst No. 8. Varner said his game is limited to the miniature version.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun reporter | September 20, 2005
He slipped onto golf's radar screen at this year's U.S. Open, shooting his way to a share of the lead after the first two rounds and into hearts of the fans after handling a disastrous final round of 84 with a self-deprecating sense of humor. On Sunday, 84 turned out to be a good number for Jason Gore. After doubling his two-stroke lead going into the final round, Gore wobbled on the back nine in the 84 Lumber Classic at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort & Spa in Farmington, Pa., but held on to win by one shot.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | June 17, 2005
ADMIT IT. You're jealous of them. They're out there walking the country's finest fairways, all color-coordinated, tastefully-logoed, bronzed-forearmed and caringly caddied. So if pro golf's elite have a bit of a time dealing with the USGA-tricked-out No. 2 course at Pinehurst for this weekend's U.S. Open, you should enjoy seeing those guys sweat through their sponsor-issued caps. Just ask NBC's Roger Maltbie. "The people I've talked to over the course of the year, they don't mind seeing the pros getting a little bloodied up once a year, watching them struggle and watching them go through what golf feels like for them on a weekly basis," Maltbie said in a conference call Wednesday.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2005
PINEHURST, N.C. - The first tee shot Tiger Woods struck in yesterday's opening round of the 105th U.S. Open at the Pinehurst Resort and Country Club settled on a cart path. A few hours later, Phil Mickelson's opening drive ricocheted off a tree and found its way to a clearing among three others. Woods recovered to make a birdie on the par-5 10th hole, and Mickelson just missed one on the par-4 first, but neither of the PGA Tour's biggest stars could accomplish what a trio of journeymen managed on the treacherous No. 2 course.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2005
PINEHURST, N.C. - Trying to re-create perfection is usually difficult, whether it's a college football team going after an unbeaten season or a concert pianist going for another mesmerizing performance. The United States Golf Association can attest to that. After hosting what many thought was the perfect U.S. Open a decade ago at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, the USGA was widely criticized after the final round last year. Going into the 105th U.S. Open, which begins today at the Pinehurst Resort and Country Club, the USGA is hoping that the same kind of praise that was heaped on the renowned No. 2 course in 1999 will be there again.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2005
PINEHURST, N.C. - The first tee shot Tiger Woods struck in yesterday's opening round of the 105th U.S. Open at the Pinehurst Resort and Country Club settled on a cart path. A few hours later, Phil Mickelson's opening drive ricocheted off a tree and found its way to a clearing among three others. Woods recovered to make a birdie on the par-5 10th hole, and Mickelson just missed one on the par-4 first, but neither of the PGA Tour's biggest stars could accomplish what a trio of journeymen managed on the treacherous No. 2 course.
NEWS
May 15, 1995
POLICE* Westminster: A resident of Pinehurst Circle reported to city police someone broke into her auto and stole property while the vehicle was parked near her home Thursday.FIRE* Westminster: Westminster responded to a woods fire on Mulligan Lane at 8:06 p.m. Thursday.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 2005
ROCKVILLE -- Three recent collegiate standouts led the way, as U.S. Open sectional qualifying wrapped up a two-day stay at Woodmont Country Club. A heavy thunderstorm early Monday evening had forced a suspension of play. With two holes left, and needing to pick up one stroke to make a playoff, Lee Williams, a recent Auburn University graduate, avoided that by holing out a 111-yard shot on the 17th hole of the North Course for an eagle-2. The 2003 Walker Cup player parred the last hole for 67-67--134.
NEWS
March 28, 2005
On March 26, 2005, DENNIS WARWICK CONRADI, of Pinewald Country Club, Pinehurst, NC, formerly of Columbia, MD, died as the result of injuries from an auto accident in Troy. Mr. Conradi retired from Sun Micro Systems and moved to Pinewald Country Club in 2001 from Columbia, MD. He is survived by his wife Charlotte Hartley Conradi, daughters Natalie C. Schimick, of Madison WI, and Nicole Conradi of Baltimore, MD, a sister Lynn C. Knight of Sacramento, CA, and two granddaughters Remy and Margaux Schimick.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.