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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
In the next step of his recovery from October knee surgery, Orioles third baseman Manny Machado will take two at-bats against Johan Santana in a “simulated” game on Saturday in Sarasota, Fla. Machado, 21, can do everything but sprint. And he will not be running the bases Saturday. “Haven't heard the word sprint yet,” Orioles manager Buck Showalter said.  He likely will take some time in between at-bats against Santana, who is recovering from offseason shoulder surgery.
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By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
If you were waiting for Chris Davis' home run to land before you got on with your business last night, you might have missed a lot. That's why blogger/reporter Jon Meoli writes the Coffee Companion --where every morning, Monday through Friday, he'll run back the biggest sports headlines from the previous day. Some very important dates - The allegedly climactic announcement of the Ravens' 2014 schedule came out last night, highlighted...
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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN REPORTER | October 24, 2006
ST. LOUIS -- One day after Smudge-gate rocked Detroit, the focus here at Busch Stadium - in a city breathlessly awaiting tonight's Game 3 of the World Series - remained the left palm of Detroit Tigers pitcher Kenny Rogers. What exactly was that light brown smudge? And who noticed it first? And what of the discovery that a similar mark had been detected during his previous starts? And, if it were pine tar and not dirt, is that so unusual, so wrong? And why did St. Louis Cardinals manager Tony La Russa decide not to push for a full inspection?
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
TORONTO - Before the fifth inning of the Orioles' 9-3 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays on Tuesday, umpires inspected right-hander Miguel Gonzalez's glove for a foreign substance at the request of Toronto manager John Gibbons. They found nothing, but Gibbons said after the game they noticed something peculiar when watching Gonzalez on video.  “We saw on the video it looked like he was going into his glove and rubbing his fingers going directly to the ball,” Gibbons said. “I know guys use stuff to get a better grip, but if you go directly to the ball ... we thought we'd take a look.
SPORTS
By Steven Petrella and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
Ozzie Guillen is no stranger to controversy, and Bryce Harper has made some headlines of his own in a three-month-old career, though he tried to lay low in his battle with the Marlins manager this weekend. On Sunday, Guillen accused the Washington Nationals outfielder of using too much pine-tar on his bat. So to apologize and make amends, Harper sent Guillen an autographed bat. The catch is, he just signed the bat and had no idea who it was intended for . It's common for players to get autographs for each other.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | October 28, 2006
The smudge on Kenny Rogers' pitching hand will surely be one of the defining images of the 2006 World Series. The Game 2 incident already has a nickname - Smudgegate. "Like it's some big mystery, an episode of Lost or CSI. I have to laugh," Hall of Fame catcher Johnny Bench said Thursday at Sinai Hospital. "Everyone says, `What was it?' There's no mystery at all. There isn't an umpire who didn't immediately know that was pine tar on Kenny's hand." Bench, 58, was in town representing a medical device company.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
If you were waiting for Chris Davis' home run to land before you got on with your business last night, you might have missed a lot. That's why blogger/reporter Jon Meoli writes the Coffee Companion --where every morning, Monday through Friday, he'll run back the biggest sports headlines from the previous day. Some very important dates - The allegedly climactic announcement of the Ravens' 2014 schedule came out last night, highlighted...
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
TORONTO - Before the fifth inning of the Orioles' 9-3 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays on Tuesday, umpires inspected right-hander Miguel Gonzalez's glove for a foreign substance at the request of Toronto manager John Gibbons. They found nothing, but Gibbons said after the game they noticed something peculiar when watching Gonzalez on video.  “We saw on the video it looked like he was going into his glove and rubbing his fingers going directly to the ball,” Gibbons said. “I know guys use stuff to get a better grip, but if you go directly to the ball ... we thought we'd take a look.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 24, 2006
St. Louis -- There's cheating and then there's cheating, or so everybody seemed to be saying as the 102nd World Series devolved yesterday into something that can best be described as Smudge-gate. Was Kenny Rogers flouting the rules of baseball if he had pine tar or some other dark, sticky substance on the palm of his left hand in the early innings of a strong Game 2 performance at Comerica Park? The rule book would answer clearly in the affirmative, and the prescribed punishment would have been a suspension if St. Louis Cardinals manager Tony La Russa had asked the umpires to check Rogers' hand and they had, indeed, found something other than infield dirt.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 19, 2005
WASHINGTON Nationals fans are understandably gleeful about the position of their team in the National League East standings, but there is trouble on the horizon. Bank on it. Manager Frank Robinson, who has done a wonderful job turning a terrible situation in Montreal into a terrific early pennant run in the nation's baseball-hungry capital, might have unwittingly opened the Pandora's box that will undo the Nats' exciting season. Maybe you missed it, if you don't stay up real late and have satellite television, but things got a little nasty the past few days in Anaheim, Calif.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
In the next step of his recovery from October knee surgery, Orioles third baseman Manny Machado will take two at-bats against Johan Santana in a “simulated” game on Saturday in Sarasota, Fla. Machado, 21, can do everything but sprint. And he will not be running the bases Saturday. “Haven't heard the word sprint yet,” Orioles manager Buck Showalter said.  He likely will take some time in between at-bats against Santana, who is recovering from offseason shoulder surgery.
SPORTS
By Steven Petrella and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
Ozzie Guillen is no stranger to controversy, and Bryce Harper has made some headlines of his own in a three-month-old career, though he tried to lay low in his battle with the Marlins manager this weekend. On Sunday, Guillen accused the Washington Nationals outfielder of using too much pine-tar on his bat. So to apologize and make amends, Harper sent Guillen an autographed bat. The catch is, he just signed the bat and had no idea who it was intended for . It's common for players to get autographs for each other.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2007
CLEVELAND -- The Cleveland Indians yesterday filed a formal protest to Major League Baseball of the Orioles' 7-4 victory Saturday night. In the game, the Orioles were awarded a run 3 1/2 innings after it actually scored. Crew chief Ed Montague ruled a run should have been counted in the top of the third inning when the Orioles had men on first and third and one out. Ramon Hernandez hit a liner that Indians center fielder Grady Sizemore made a diving catch on. Nick Markakis, the runner at third, crossed the plate before the Indians had stepped on first to double up Miguel Tejada, who admittedly lost track of how many outs there were and was bound for third when Sizemore's throw was heading to the infield.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | October 28, 2006
The smudge on Kenny Rogers' pitching hand will surely be one of the defining images of the 2006 World Series. The Game 2 incident already has a nickname - Smudgegate. "Like it's some big mystery, an episode of Lost or CSI. I have to laugh," Hall of Fame catcher Johnny Bench said Thursday at Sinai Hospital. "Everyone says, `What was it?' There's no mystery at all. There isn't an umpire who didn't immediately know that was pine tar on Kenny's hand." Bench, 58, was in town representing a medical device company.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 24, 2006
St. Louis-- --Psst ... did you hear about the Detroit Tigers pitcher? Out there on the mound the other night, a half-dozen syringes sticking out of his left arm, vapor rub under the bill of his cap, pine tar on his glove, Vaseline on his lips and cheating in his heart. Quick, convene a congressional committee! Tell Bud Selig not to sign the collective bargaining agreement just yet. We need Leslie Nielsen strip-searching pitchers and military investigators in the baseball media to get to the bottom of this one. Well, please excuse me if I have a hard time joining the morality mob. The day off between games 2 and 3 yesterday provided plenty of time for speculating, finger-pointing and whispering.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN REPORTER | October 24, 2006
ST. LOUIS -- One day after Smudge-gate rocked Detroit, the focus here at Busch Stadium - in a city breathlessly awaiting tonight's Game 3 of the World Series - remained the left palm of Detroit Tigers pitcher Kenny Rogers. What exactly was that light brown smudge? And who noticed it first? And what of the discovery that a similar mark had been detected during his previous starts? And, if it were pine tar and not dirt, is that so unusual, so wrong? And why did St. Louis Cardinals manager Tony La Russa decide not to push for a full inspection?
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | October 9, 1994
The Governor's Cup was at stake in 1983, and tempers were running high. Davey Johnson was managing the Tidewater Tides, Johnny Oates the Columbus Clippers. What made the brawl that broke out unusual was it was started, not broken up, by the managers."He had one of our players hit or something," Johnson recalled. "We stole a base with a six-run lead in the fifth, and he didn't think we should be running. I told him, 'Johnny, I tell you what, you can manage your team and I'll manage mine.' We started fighting and everyone joined in."
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2002
MINNEAPOLIS - Orioles manager Mike Hargrove insisted he wasn't using gamesmanship on Minnesota Twins closer Eddie Guardado last night. Hargrove said he was simply doing his job when he asked the umpires to check the large soiled spot on the left hip of Guardado's uniform for pine tar. The umpires let Guardado stay in the game, but he blew a rare save chance as the Orioles scored two ninth-inning runs. Instead of getting angry, the Twins got even, capitalizing on a throwing error by Orioles second baseman Jerry Hairston to send the game into extra innings - always a dangerous proposition for visitors to the Metrodome.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 24, 2006
St. Louis -- There's cheating and then there's cheating, or so everybody seemed to be saying as the 102nd World Series devolved yesterday into something that can best be described as Smudge-gate. Was Kenny Rogers flouting the rules of baseball if he had pine tar or some other dark, sticky substance on the palm of his left hand in the early innings of a strong Game 2 performance at Comerica Park? The rule book would answer clearly in the affirmative, and the prescribed punishment would have been a suspension if St. Louis Cardinals manager Tony La Russa had asked the umpires to check Rogers' hand and they had, indeed, found something other than infield dirt.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 19, 2005
WASHINGTON Nationals fans are understandably gleeful about the position of their team in the National League East standings, but there is trouble on the horizon. Bank on it. Manager Frank Robinson, who has done a wonderful job turning a terrible situation in Montreal into a terrific early pennant run in the nation's baseball-hungry capital, might have unwittingly opened the Pandora's box that will undo the Nats' exciting season. Maybe you missed it, if you don't stay up real late and have satellite television, but things got a little nasty the past few days in Anaheim, Calif.
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