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Pine Nuts

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By Marie Bianco and Marie Bianco,Newsday | January 16, 1991
Along with caviar, saffron and truffles, pine nuts are among the most expensive foods we eat. A small jar, about 1 3/4 ounces, costs $1.99.And no wonder. The preparation is a long process. First you have to find a pine tree at least 25 years old; then someone has to gather the cones, competing with birds, squirrels and other small animals for the seeds; then remove the seeds from the cones and, finally, remove the nuts from the seeds.To us, they may be a luxury food, but to the Navajo and Pueblo Indians of the Southwest, pine nuts are a diet staple.
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By Catherine Mallette,
The Baltimore Sun
| July 15, 2013
With my husband out of a town, and full share from the Moon Valley Farm in my refrigerator, I decided to give myself a bold challenge: I would not do any additional grocery shopping this week, but find creative ways to use all the great vegetables and pantry items I already had. Because I am the kind of person who doesn't feel the need to eat certain kinds of foods at specific times of day, having to feed only myself seemed incredibly freeing....
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FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 20, 2006
At the small New England school where my husband teaches, graduation week is one of the most anticipated of the year. You can feel the buzz on campus. Seniors walk with a certain swagger. They've just finished four years of hard work, reading an infinite number of books, cramming for lab tests and pulling all-nighters to get papers in on time. Finally, it's time for celebration. I often get calls from students (especially those who love to cook) asking for advice about planning graduation parties or what to serve, and I love helping.
TRAVEL
Stephanie Citron and Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2011
Getting there Although trains travel to the region (Amtrak to New York, then Metro North to Peekskill), the best way to see the expansive Hudson Valley region is via car. From Baltimore, West Point is about 270 miles. The five-hour drive up Interstate 95, then the New Jersey Turnpike to the Garden State Parkway North finally becomes picturesque once you enter the Palisades Parkway, eventually landing you in the Hudson Valley, where you'll follow a series of smallish roads overlooking the Hudson River to the Academy.
NEWS
By Steve Petusevsky and Steve Petusevsky,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 3, 1999
Pine nuts or pignoli are tiny seeds from one species of pine tree that grows in Italy, China, Spain, Portugal and Australia. When I used to shop for pine nuts, I wondered why they were so expensive, until I learned that they are normally harvested by hand.Moreover, pine trees only start producing pine nuts after 25 years and only become commercially viable after 75 years. Pine nuts are still an integral part of Italian cuisine and are a staple in most pesto recipes. They also are used by Indian tribes from Mexico and the southern United States.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | October 7, 2009
Andrew Telzak got a great deal on pine nuts at an Asian market in Catonsville and whipped up a batch of pesto for friends. It tasted great. But for days afterward, nothing else did. "I started getting this weird taste, kind of a metallic taste, in the back of my tongue," said Telzak, 23, a North Baltimore resident who works for the city health department. "Everything was tasting real bitter." Some of his guests had the same experience. One of them Googled "everything tastes bitter" and came across "pine mouth," a mysterious taste dysfunction associated with pine nuts that can last for weeks.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | February 7, 2001
THE SIEGE OF the pine nuts began a few weeks ago, shortly after we got a late-night phone call from James "Buzzy" Cusack, a friend and neighbor. Buzzy said something like " Psssst, wanna buy some pine nuts?" Buzzy had sniffed out a deal on pine nuts grown, as they say in gourmet circles, on the wrong side of the tracks. These were Chinese pine nuts, as opposed to the familiar, high-flying Portuguese-grown variety. Buzzy was a fan of the Chinese pine nuts and was putting together a consortium to make a bulk purchase of the lesser-known nuts at Jeppi Nut, a well-regarded nut house just east of downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Donna Deane and Donna Deane,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 2004
If you've ever gazed up at the pine tree in your yard and wondered if you could harvest some fresh pine nuts from those cones, the answer is yes - and good luck. Pine nuts come from specific varieties of pine trees, about 20 worldwide, that produce edible seeds. The individual seeds are encased in a hard shell inside the pine cone. After harvesting, the cones must first be heated, then left to dry before small, hard seeds can be shaken out of the cones. These seeds are cracked open to get to the pine nut. This labor-intensive harvesting is the reason pine nuts are so expensive (the most expensive after macadamia nuts)
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 14, 2005
This combo of pesto, artichoke and toasted pine nuts is based on the "Pete's a Pie" pizza served at Randy's Wooster Street, a small chain of pizza shops in Connecticut. This pie epitomizes what I call the New Haven school of pizza-making: super-thin pies sparingly adorned with flavorful ingredients, then baked to an appealing crispness at super-high temperatures in wood- or coal-fired ovens. Your home oven won't get the crust quite as crisp but the pizza still will be delicious. Tips Varieties of ready-made pizza doughs or crusts are available at supermarkets.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 7, 2007
Olives and pine nuts give this 20-minute veal stew a rich, Mediterranean flavor. It's based on delicious meals I enjoyed on trips to Italy. Pine nuts are also called pignoli. They may be stocked with the spices, the other nuts or in the gourmet section of your market. Store leftover nuts in the freezer. Mediterranean Veal With Orange Barley -- Makes 2 servings olive-oil spray 1/2 pound veal stewing meat, trimmed of fat and cut into 1-inch cubes 1 cup diced yellow onion 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1/2 cup dry white wine 1 cup low-salt, no-sugar-added canned, crushed tomatoes 3 to 4 cups broccoli florets ( 1/2 pound)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
Jesus Perez Goenaga, a founder of downtown's Tio Pepe restaurant who as its pastry chef created desserts that were "sinful perfection," died of pneumonia May 10 at Lakewood Ranch Medical Center in Bradenton, Fla. He was 77. Born in Burgos, Spain, he was the son of the personal chef to Francisco Franco, the country's military leader and dictator. His father taught him to scrub stock pots with sand. Mr. Goenaga attended culinary and pastry-making schools and worked in Madrid's Ritz Hotel and the Jockey Club as well as in a San Sebastian restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | April 5, 2011
I was trolling the grocery store last weekend looking for pesto. The kind that sits in a jar on the shelf kind of creeps me out and the fresh options were either nonexistent or too expensive. So, I thought, why not make it myself? Turns out it’s easy to make and takes no time at all! The flavor is also much fresher than what you can find on the shelf. Pesto Recipe 4 C fresh organic basil, packed 1/2 C extra virgin olive oil 1/3 C pine nuts 1/2 C freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano 6-7 cloves garlic 1/2 tsp sea salt   1. Rinse the basil well, pull off any large stems, and dry well.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | October 7, 2009
Andrew Telzak got a great deal on pine nuts at an Asian market in Catonsville and whipped up a batch of pesto for friends. It tasted great. But for days afterward, nothing else did. "I started getting this weird taste, kind of a metallic taste, in the back of my tongue," said Telzak, 23, a North Baltimore resident who works for the city health department. "Everything was tasting real bitter." Some of his guests had the same experience. One of them Googled "everything tastes bitter" and came across "pine mouth," a mysterious taste dysfunction associated with pine nuts that can last for weeks.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 5, 2008
Recently, several friends, all foodies par excellence, couldn't wait to tell me about a dish they had sampled while traveling along Italy's Amalfi coast. One day they had indulged in a huge lunch that included fritto misto (mixed fried food), lasagna and a cornucopia of grilled meats, but they were most excited about a simple creation prepared with broccoli rabe. Also known as rapini, broccoli rabe has slim stalks (not thick ones like traditional broccoli) with dark green leaves and small buds that resemble miniature broccoli florets.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 7, 2007
Olives and pine nuts give this 20-minute veal stew a rich, Mediterranean flavor. It's based on delicious meals I enjoyed on trips to Italy. Pine nuts are also called pignoli. They may be stocked with the spices, the other nuts or in the gourmet section of your market. Store leftover nuts in the freezer. Mediterranean Veal With Orange Barley -- Makes 2 servings olive-oil spray 1/2 pound veal stewing meat, trimmed of fat and cut into 1-inch cubes 1 cup diced yellow onion 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1/2 cup dry white wine 1 cup low-salt, no-sugar-added canned, crushed tomatoes 3 to 4 cups broccoli florets ( 1/2 pound)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | August 15, 2007
This summer, I am blessed with basil. My plants are growing faster than zucchini, sprouting new leaves as rapidly as mayoral candidates spout promises. I have so much of the fragrant foliage that I am trying new tricks with it. The other night, for instance, I dropped a few basil leaves on the barbecue grill. This maneuver was supposed to keep mosquitoes at bay. It was semi-successful. No mosquitoes buzzed the barbecue. But when I wandered away from the aromatic fire, a few of those pesky Asian tiger mosquitoes chowed down on the back of my bare legs.
NEWS
By BILL DALEY and BILL DALEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 8, 2006
Admit it, chard is kind of scary. With the vegetable's strong stems poking holes in your plastic grocery bag and leaves the size of a kitchen cutting board, the whole idea of wrestling the neon-veined chard into shape for a quick dinner seems impossible. But it can be done; simply separate the leaves from the stems (save stems for a future weekend use) and roughly chop the leaves into ribbons. Cook, covered, for five minutes in garlic-scented olive oil and the chard is ready. Sauteed chopped chard provides the muscle for this vegetarian one-dish pasta meal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette,
The Baltimore Sun
| July 15, 2013
With my husband out of a town, and full share from the Moon Valley Farm in my refrigerator, I decided to give myself a bold challenge: I would not do any additional grocery shopping this week, but find creative ways to use all the great vegetables and pantry items I already had. Because I am the kind of person who doesn't feel the need to eat certain kinds of foods at specific times of day, having to feed only myself seemed incredibly freeing....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | May 31, 2007
ZPizza, a California-based chain that recently came to Maryland, is founded on the simple, hard-to-argue-with concept that everyone's favorite fast food, the pizza, can be both more healthful and more interesting. It serves thin-crust pizzas with low-fat cheeses and organic sauces, topped with ingredients including artichoke hearts, soy cheeses and pine nuts. Gourmet pizzas are certainly nothing new. They've been around at least since the early 1980s, when Wolfgang Puck famously added caviar and smoked salmon to his and served them to celebrities at his Los Angeles restaurant, Spago.
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