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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
For the last 23 of its 43 years, the Young Victorian Theatre Company made its home each summer on the campus of Bryn Mawr in what was, at best, an adequate performance facility. It had a cramped, low-ceilinged stage, dry acoustics and no orchestra pit. Getting evicted - Bryn Mawr needed the venue back - turned out to be the best thing that could have happened to the troupe, Baltimore's intrepid champion of the Gilbert and Sullivan canon. Relocated to another tony institution, Young Vic now enjoys a very appealing space, which it is breaking in with a buoyant production of “H.M.S.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
This being summer, Baltimore's Young Victorian Theatre Company is reveling in the glories of Gilbert and Sullivan. This year's production of 'H.M.S. Pinafore' got Midweek Madness thinking about this sequence from a "Peter Pan" cartoon that finds Captain Hook breezing through the score to the operetta in one minute.
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FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 12, 1998
Irene Lewis' stark but spirited production of Gilbert and Sullivan's "H.M.S. Pinafore" closed last Sunday, but not before obliterating the theater's previous box office income record set last season by another Lewis production, "Romeo and Juliet."The light opera classic grossed $186,747 in single ticket receipts, easily surpassing the Shakespeare tragedy, which earned $159,629 last spring. Total income for the "H.M.S. Pinafore" production, including subscription seats, also set a record -- $407,513.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
For the last 23 of its 43 years, the Young Victorian Theatre Company made its home each summer on the campus of Bryn Mawr in what was, at best, an adequate performance facility. It had a cramped, low-ceilinged stage, dry acoustics and no orchestra pit. Getting evicted - Bryn Mawr needed the venue back - turned out to be the best thing that could have happened to the troupe, Baltimore's intrepid champion of the Gilbert and Sullivan canon. Relocated to another tony institution, Young Vic now enjoys a very appealing space, which it is breaking in with a buoyant production of “H.M.S.
FEATURES
By Bill Hyder and Bill Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 1998
"At present there are forty-two companies playing 'Pinafore' about the country. Companies formed after six p.m. yesterday are not included."That item appeared in an American newspaper in 1879. Although meant as a joke, it was not far from the truth. "H.M.S. Pinafore" was a theatrical phenomenon, far more successful and influential in its time than "The Phantom of the Opera" in our own.More than a century later, the show still packs power. When Baltimore's Center Stage decided to produce a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta this season, "H.M.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | July 10, 2007
For its annual production of a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, the Young Victorian Theatre Company has not so much sprinkled Baltimore-isms on H.M.S. Pinafore as drowned the old vessel in them. That's not to say the result is all wet, but merely to point out that anyone who prefers G&S reasonably undiluted may have some trouble swallowing this concoction. Saturday night's opening performance at the Bryn Mawr School generated enough musical values and high spirits, though, to keep the ever-fresh spark of Sullivan's brilliant score burning nicely.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 20, 1998
Gilbert and Sullivan's famed operetta "H.M.S. Pinafore" is generally produced on a lavish scale with a slew of sailors, not to mention the Lord of the Admiralty's myriad sisters, cousins and aunts.But Center Stage has shrunk the ship down to dinghy size and turned the show into a chamber operetta with a crew of only six sailors and a mere quartet of sisters, cousins and aunts. "Pinafore," however, is not only a sturdy enough vessel to remain afloat, it comes through shipshape.This charming and amusing production is the theater's first Gilbert and Sullivan, and it's hardly surprising that director Irene Lewis has tampered with tradition in staging it. After all, G&S can be seen as the Shakespeare of operettas, and this is a theater -- and a director -- never content to stage Shakespeare as it was done in his day.Nor is size (which is mainly a budgetary concern)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2001
J. Ernest Green had misgivings about going forward with performances of a light Gilbert and Sullivan operetta in the wake of the terrorist attacks. But Green, the music director of the Annapolis Chorale and Annapolis Chamber Orchestra's production of H.M.S. Pinafore, decided that the show must - or at least should - go on. "The act of making music has given us all a brief respite and has shown us the power that music has to take us away, however briefly, from the uncertainty of daily life," Green said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [ANNA EISENBERG] | July 5, 2007
`Pinafore' docks in Baltimore The lowdown -- The Young Victorian Theatre Company presents the comic opera HMS Pinafore this weekend. The directors have changed the show's setting from the British Portsmouth harbor to Baltimore's Inner Harbor, so be prepared for hometown laughs. If you go -- Showtimes are 10:30 a.m. (children's matinee) and 8 p.m. Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. July 12-14 and 3 p.m. July 15. Tickets are $36 ($15 for the children's matinee). The opera is performed at Bryn Mawr School's Centennial Hall, 109 W. Melrose Ave. in Roland Park.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | June 27, 1991
Veteran sailor J. Ernest Green took his 23-foot Alberg out on waters near Annapolis the other day with a friend, Jim Katchko. It was a free moment before the two sail away for real Friday on Gilbert and Sullivan's "H.M.S. Pinafore," opening a run of seven productions of the Young Victorian Theater at Bryn Mawr School.Green is music director and Katchko is tenor lead Ralph Rackstraw. The entire veteran cast of leads is returning for a Young Vic reunion. This is the company's 21st season as a Baltimore summer tradition but its first as an independent company away from Gilman School's sponsorship.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
Music director J. Ernest Green began another season of extraordinary music-making with Live Arts Maryland's mid-September production of Gilbert and Sullivan's "HMS Pinafore," featuring the Annapolis Chorale, Annapolis Chamber Orchestra and soloists at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. For this lively 2011-2012 season opener, Green was assisted by stage director Catrin Davies, who played Maria in last season's "The Sound of Music" and here displayed another talent by keeping the high-seas comic action swirling smoothly.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | July 10, 2007
For its annual production of a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, the Young Victorian Theatre Company has not so much sprinkled Baltimore-isms on H.M.S. Pinafore as drowned the old vessel in them. That's not to say the result is all wet, but merely to point out that anyone who prefers G&S reasonably undiluted may have some trouble swallowing this concoction. Saturday night's opening performance at the Bryn Mawr School generated enough musical values and high spirits, though, to keep the ever-fresh spark of Sullivan's brilliant score burning nicely.
FEATURES
By Anna Eisenberg and Anna Eisenberg,Sun reporter | July 5, 2007
A veteran of musical theater (think Hairspray, hon), Baltimore expands its range this month with a prominent role in a classic, equally well-coiffed comedy. The Young Victorian Theatre Company, devoted to the operatic works of William Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, opens its 37th season this weekend with the duo's HMS Pinafore - but this time the audience favorite has a hometown twist. If you go HMS Pinafore runs through July 15 at Bryn Mawr School's Centennial Hall, 109 W. Melrose Ave. in Roland Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [ANNA EISENBERG] | July 5, 2007
`Pinafore' docks in Baltimore The lowdown -- The Young Victorian Theatre Company presents the comic opera HMS Pinafore this weekend. The directors have changed the show's setting from the British Portsmouth harbor to Baltimore's Inner Harbor, so be prepared for hometown laughs. If you go -- Showtimes are 10:30 a.m. (children's matinee) and 8 p.m. Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. July 12-14 and 3 p.m. July 15. Tickets are $36 ($15 for the children's matinee). The opera is performed at Bryn Mawr School's Centennial Hall, 109 W. Melrose Ave. in Roland Park.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2001
J. Ernest Green had misgivings about going forward with performances of a light Gilbert and Sullivan operetta in the wake of the terrorist attacks. But Green, the music director of the Annapolis Chorale and Annapolis Chamber Orchestra's production of H.M.S. Pinafore, decided that the show must - or at least should - go on. "The act of making music has given us all a brief respite and has shown us the power that music has to take us away, however briefly, from the uncertainty of daily life," Green said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | July 12, 2001
'H.M.S. Pinafore' Follow the classic tale of mismatched lovers and mistaken identities aboard the H.M.S. Pinafore when the Gilbert and Sullivan comic operetta docks at Bryn Mawr School, 109 W. Melrose Ave., tomorrow through July 22. Presented by the Young Victorian Theatre Company, the nautical adventure features, among others, Dan Rodricks as Sir Joseph Porter, Jeremy Blossey as Ralph Rackstraw and Sara Stewart as Josephine. Show time is 8 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 10, 2001
In 1880, a musical show on Broadway was as much in demand as The Producers would be 121 years later. But audiences had a slightly easier time getting tickets than Mel Brooks fans do today, for this particular entertainment was running in at least six theaters simultaneously. The only trouble was that the shoddy producers of these separate ventures were all guilty of artistic fraud. The public that paid good money to catch the latest sensation from England, Gilbert and Sullivan's H.M.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | July 12, 2001
'H.M.S. Pinafore' Follow the classic tale of mismatched lovers and mistaken identities aboard the H.M.S. Pinafore when the Gilbert and Sullivan comic operetta docks at Bryn Mawr School, 109 W. Melrose Ave., tomorrow through July 22. Presented by the Young Victorian Theatre Company, the nautical adventure features, among others, Dan Rodricks as Sir Joseph Porter, Jeremy Blossey as Ralph Rackstraw and Sara Stewart as Josephine. Show time is 8 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 10, 2001
In 1880, a musical show on Broadway was as much in demand as The Producers would be 121 years later. But audiences had a slightly easier time getting tickets than Mel Brooks fans do today, for this particular entertainment was running in at least six theaters simultaneously. The only trouble was that the shoddy producers of these separate ventures were all guilty of artistic fraud. The public that paid good money to catch the latest sensation from England, Gilbert and Sullivan's H.M.S.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 12, 1998
Irene Lewis' stark but spirited production of Gilbert and Sullivan's "H.M.S. Pinafore" closed last Sunday, but not before obliterating the theater's previous box office income record set last season by another Lewis production, "Romeo and Juliet."The light opera classic grossed $186,747 in single ticket receipts, easily surpassing the Shakespeare tragedy, which earned $159,629 last spring. Total income for the "H.M.S. Pinafore" production, including subscription seats, also set a record -- $407,513.
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