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NEWS
May 16, 2014
I'm a firm believer that no government body should engage in public prayer ( "Carroll commissioners resume practice of sectarian prayer," May 13). A moment of silence for personal reflection is appropriate; invoking a deity is not. If city, county, state or federal officials feel the overwhelming need to publicly pray, there is a better way to do it, and that is to follow the example set by Richard Monterrey, jockey and youth minister. "Lord, take care of all those here who are risking their lives today - jockeys and gallop boys, the gate crews and trainers...
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Friday morning's torrential rain gave fans and handicappers at Pimlico's Black-Eyed Susan Day a much different race card than they had planned for. But by the time the showpiece Black-Eyed Susan Stakes ran under a clear blue sky Friday afternoon and the Counting Crows took the stage later that evening, the torrential downpours that Pimlico officials said dumped 2 1/4 inches of rain at the track were a distant memory. "The track is going to be fast [tomorrow]," Pimlico racing analyst Gabby Gaudet said from her trackside post Friday evening.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Confidence ran high in the Kentucky Derby champion. Bred for stamina by one of America's grand old racing families and fine-tuned by one of the sport's most respected trainers, Orb went off as a commanding 3-5 favorite in the 2013 Preakness. Two minutes later, he was another unsuccessful Triple Crown aspirant, having failed to fight his way out of traffic after starting from the No. 1 post. He would never win another race. Turns of fortune are swift and unpredictable in thoroughbred racing, even for the champions who appear least vulnerable.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Heads bowed, hands clasped, they stood in the jockeys' room at Pimlico Race Course , one hour to first post, as one of their own led the riders in prayer. "Lord, take care of all those here who are risking their lives today - the jockeys and gallop boys, the gate crews and trainers," Richard Monterrey implored. "As for those who've come to bet on the horses, we pray that you protect them, too. " Then the group dispersed to don their silks. Those who face danger each time they ride a 1,000-pound horse at speeds reaching 40 mph say that a prayer beforehand calms their nerves and anchors their lives.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | May 14, 2014
If you go the Preakness this weekend, odds are you'll recognize the voice calling the race. That's because the voice belongs to Dave Rodman, who has called the Preakness - and every other horse race at Baltimore's Pimlico Race Course, except when he was sick or on vacation - every year since 1991. "I've never really put a number to it," said Rodman, when asked to estimate how many races he's called. "I'm not trying to break any world records or anything. " Perhaps not. But Rodman, who moved to North Laurel when he got the Pimlico job 23 years ago and now lives in Ellicott City, already has secured a place among the nation's elite horse racing announcers.
SPORTS
By Aaron Dodson, Childs Walker and Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
Before California Chrome could even reach his nose across the finish line in the Kentucky Derby, the chestnut colt's exercise rider, Willie Delgado , received a text from his biggest fan back home. “Daddy, I can't believe you just won the Kentucky Derby,” wrote Delgado's 6-year-old daughter, Savannah. Two weeks later, the 46-year-old former jockey is still soaking in the victory. But his emotions don't revolve solely around the thrill of California Chrome's chase for the Triple Crown, which will continue Saturday in the 139th Preakness Stakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah LaCorte and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
Longshots, exotics, exacta boxes? For first-time bettors lining up before the teller at the Preakness, horse racing and handicapping terminology can be overwhelming. In a gambling game that is more than probability, learning the ins and outs of horse betting can also be exciting - and profitable. We're here to help. Well, Preakness handicapper Gabby Gaudet is here to help. Gaudet offers expert tips on how to choose the right steed and lists some common betting mistakes to avoid. A recent Towson University graduate, Gaudet, 23, was selected as the Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park racing analyst last fall.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
Ron Sanchez's roots in horse racing go deep into his childhood in Caracas, Venezuela, where his maternal grandmother took him to the races every weekend at La Rinconada, the country's largest and oldest track. "I was five years old and we'd walk all the way to the track, it's like two miles," Sanchez recalled Monday at Pimlico. "I fall in love [with horse racing]. Once you get here [to the race track], it's impossible to get out. " Though Sanchez also dreamed of becoming a major league baseball player - he was a member of the Venezuelan national team in his late teens and said he "almost signed" a pro contract - the love of racing never left.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
California Chrome has a bit of Hollywood in him. Just a few steps into his first afternoon at Pimlico Race Course on Monday, the Kentucky Derby champion stopped and posed regally before a pack of photographers click, click, clicking. The handsome chestnut seemed to relish his turn as the Brad Pitt of Preakness week. “I think he loves it,” said assistant trainer Alan Sherman. “He'll sit out there and pose all day. He loves the cameras and the attention.” California Chrome is certainly used to the glare after winning the Kentucky Derby as a heavy favorite and horse of the people.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Dale Austin, a retired Baltimore Sun reporter whose coverage of Maryland horse racing spanned a half-century and took him on assignments as far away as England, died in his sleep Friday at his Bayside Beach home. He was 81. His wife of 38 years, the former Ann Brownhill, said Mr. Austin had spent Thursday at the doctor's office and was feeling frail and "very, very tired," but the specific cause of death is unknown. Mrs. Austin said she discovered early Friday that her husband - an enthusiastic Baltimore sports fan - had gone to lie down before watching the NFL draft and never woke up. Born on St. Patrick's Day in Poteau, Okla., Mr. Austin was the son of Jefferson Davis and Eula Grace Austin.
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