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Pilot Program

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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Anne Arundel County public schools will launch a pilot program in the new school year giving some elementary school students instruction in specific themes, including global studies, arts and the humanities, and the use of science and technology in society. Superintendent George Arlotto said Thursday each of the nine elementary schools that feed into North County High School will take part in the program, dubbed Triple E: Enhancing Elementary Excellence. It will begin Sept. 29, about a month after Monday's start of the school year.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Anne Arundel County public schools will launch a pilot program in the new school year giving some elementary school students instruction in specific themes, including global studies, arts and the humanities, and the use of science and technology in society. Superintendent George Arlotto said Thursday each of the nine elementary schools that feed into North County High School will take part in the program, dubbed Triple E: Enhancing Elementary Excellence. It will begin Sept. 29, about a month after Monday's start of the school year.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Baltimore City will spend nearly $578,000 on a pilot program to provide large trash cans to 9,250 households, following approval by the city's spending panel Wednesday. The Board of Estimates awarded the project - designed to control the city's rat population and reduce litter - to the Statesville, N.C.-based company, Toter. If the program is successful, it could be scaled citywide for approximately $10 million, according to the city's Bureau of Solid Waste. Residents in two communities will receive the 65-gallon containers, which will come on wheels and be equipped with a tracking device.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Visitors, employees and neighbors of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport now have a new option for enjoying the 12.5-mile trail that loops around the airport's Anne Arundel County property. The Boston-based bikeshare company Zagster, working with BWI, has installed a dock for 10 of its bicycles outside the airport's international terminal, near the light rail station. They are available for rental for $5 a day. Long-term passes for regular use cost $15 a month or $50 a year. Officials envision the bikes being used by airport travelers with time to kill and an urge to get outside, employees looking for a bit of exercise on a break or after work, and neighbors looking to take better advantage of the trail.
NEWS
August 15, 1995
The Clinton administration approved yesterday a pilot program in which some Maryland welfare recipients will be denied benefits unless they agree to look for work.The program, passed by the legislature earlier this year, is scheduled to start in Anne Arundel County, Prince George's County and Baltimore in April.The administration also approved Maryland's plan to require teen-age mothers to live at home and to stop paying additional cash benefits for children conceived while their parents are on welfare.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Andrea F. Siegel and Shirley Leung and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer Carol L. Bowers contributed to this article | May 19, 1995
Thirty kindergarten students at Crofton Woods Elementary School could learn to read, write and speak French before they learn the same English skills under a pilot program that would begin in September.But some of their parents have questioned starting the program when the school system can't afford computers and other supplies. "Why are we considering implementing a program that will benefit so few students when money is so tight?" asked Richard S. Zipper, a Crofton parent who has gathered 125 signatures protesting the program.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | October 13, 1991
The residents of 323 Bel Air households will be getting the county'sattention when they start putting blue bags filled with glass, plastic, cans, newspapers and yard waste at their curbs later this month.Bel Air administrators have selected the homes in the Major's Choice, Howard Park, Bradford Village and Homestead neighborhoods for a pilot program to see how the town's proposed recycling program will work.Because the Bel Air program is nearly identical to the one the county plans to introduce to about 52,000 households next year, the outcome of the town's four-month test could set the standard for Harford.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Stepping up its assault on illegal immigration, the Clinton administration announced yesterday a nationwide expansion of a pilot program in California that requires participating employers to verify the legal status of job seekers.Specifically, the Immigration and Naturalization Service reached agreement with the nation's four largest meat-packing companies, representing 80 percent of the industry's 70,000 employees, to use a computerized data system at 41 plants in 12 Western and Midwestern states to determine if job applicants are legal workers.
TRAVEL
By BRUCE MOHL and BRUCE MOHL,BOSTON GLOBE | November 20, 2005
Travelers who voluntarily undergo a background check and pay an annual fee will be allowed to move through airport security checkpoints much faster under a new government program starting next year. Kip Hawley, head of the U.S. Transportation Security Administration, announced recently that he expects the program to be fully operational in June. The TSA will oversee the program and check participants against terrorist and criminal databases, but private companies hired by individual airports will recruit the travelers, gather their personal information, and verify identities at security checkpoints.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2005
A pilot program in more than 30 Baltimore County elementary schools has greatly increased the number of poor and minority children in gifted-and-talented programs, according to a report presented last night to the county school board. The program looks beyond test scores to identify children as gifted, sending resource teachers to schools to evaluate pupils. It has been launched in 38 Title 1 schools, which receive extra federal money because they serve large numbers of poor children. The report looks at 31 schools.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Users of the Maryland Transit Administration's bus system will be able to track buses in their area via their smartphones and other mobile devices starting this fall, one of many changes announced Monday as part of the agency's multiyear bus improvement plan. Riders will also see updated bus schedules, additional MTA supervisors showing up along bus routes and increased service to certain job centers, such as the rising Horseshoe Casino Baltimore on Russell Street. The changes are part of the agency's Bus Network Improvement Project, which was launched last summer with the goal of improving service using the input of local residents.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
A group of young men at Howard Community College are giving new meaning to the Orwellian phrase, "Big Brother is watching you. " They are members of the community college's leadership program Howard PRIDE (Purpose, Respect, Initiative, Determination, Excellence), and their designated Big Brother is Steven Freeman, the program's assistant director. To say they relish his watchful eye is an understatement. What began as a pilot program three years ago offering math support to boost graduation rates among African-American males has become a resource and mentoring tool for any Howard Community College male of color.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
A group of McDaniel College students and elementary school kids have only needed one thing to bond: a couple of hours in the gym together. With a few balls, a plastic bat and some jump ropes, the newly established Fitness Buddies group meets weekly under the direction of Roger Isom, a McDaniel sophomore who designed the program. It's kind of like Big Brothers Big Sisters for fitness, says Isom, an exercise science and physical education major. "I want to show them that exercise isn't just for athletes," he says.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
An Anne Arundel County program that withholds tax refunds from people with outstanding warrants - and last year enticed hundreds of people to turn themselves in - could be expanded to Baltimore and possibly even statewide. The idea, tried by county Sheriff Ron Bateman, has produced impressive results. Last year, his office sent letters to 446 people with warrants, saying refunds wouldn't be mailed until they settled their legal issues. The result: 345 people - 77 percent of those notified - turned themselves in, including some who faced criminal charges for assault, drugs and prostitution.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Holding a whiteboard, the University of Maryland, College Park students scrawled their complaints and posed for a picture. "My name is Justin and I spent $114 on ONE textbook," a student wrote. "My name is Jeff and I spent $736 on textbooks," wrote another. The images, posted online by the Student Government Association in recent months, are designed to highlight the rapid rise in the price of college textbooks over the past decade. This semester, the University System of Maryland is exploring ways to bring that cost to zero with "open-source" electronic textbooks — the latest experiment in changing the way students in Maryland and across the nation are taught.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Christian Rojas has a plan. The Iraq War veteran wants to get his paralegal certificate. Then, he figures, he'll go into business for himself, helping people write their wills and file motions in court. He dreams of earning a law degree eventually and practicing law. First, though, he has to get out of prison. Rojas, 33, is at Eastern Correctional Institution in Westover in Somerset County, where he is serving seven years for holding up a couple of fast-food restaurants in Severn in 2011.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | September 10, 2006
Two organizations that help disabled people with financial assistance and job training are teaming up at Carroll County's new nonprofit center in Westminster. In a new partnership, Wellness Employee Service Transfer Inc. (WEST) and Catastrophic Health Planners Inc. recently secured a $51,000 grant from the state's human services agency to help disabled people, those who have experienced catastrophic events and those who suffered life-threatening illnesses enter the work force. "We have had grants before, but this brings in another piece in helping those that can work get to work," said Esther Davis, who founded WEST in 1999 and still operates a satellite office in Towson.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
Taneytown is looking to build a national reputation as the place women go to start a business.Officials there plan to begin a pilot program designed to attract women entrepreneurs and offer them four essential services: advice, training, loan assistance and office help.It is not all altruistic."Women-owned businesses are the most successful in the nation," City Manager Charles P. Boyles II told a breakfast crowd of more than 70 local business leaders Friday."The statistics are enough to open your eyes.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | January 15, 2014
Towson restaurant owners and food truck advocates said during a Baltimore County Council work session Tuesday that they support a proposed bill that would establish a pilot program to regulate food trucks in downtown Towson. "Food trucks would like to be a part of Towson as it grows and goes through its redevelopment," Damian Bohager, president of the Maryland Mobile Food Vendors Association, told the council. "We think it's a great idea as a pilot program and we look forward to revisiting it in a couple years.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
The professional organization for NFL athletic trainers has endorsed USA Football's Heads Up Football program, which teaches kids safe tackling technique. The Professional Football Athletic Trainers Society on Thursday announced its plan to partner with USA Football in an effort to prevent concussions in youth football. "Athlete safety is advanced through education, and that is the heart of USA Football's Heads Up Football program,” society President John Norwig said in a statement.
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