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Pilot Error

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By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1997
A Baltimore pilot was seriously injured yesterday when his single-engine plane crashed into dense woods about 400 yards east of the runway at Clearview Airpark near Westminster.Jerome Lamprecht, 72, of the 1200 block of W. Lake Ave. was taken by state MedEvac helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where he was in serious but stable condition, a hospital spokeswoman said last night.No one on the ground was injured, state police said.Federal Aviation Administration officials were called to investigate, but police said pilot error appeared to have caused the crash at 2: 18 p.m.Lowell Seal, who has owned and operated Clearview Airpark for about 25 years, said he was standing near the runway when a red and white Beechcraft Bonanza began to land downwind, meaning it approached the 1,845-foot runway from the northwest with a tail wind of about 8 to 10 knots.
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NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
The federal government is blaming the state of Maryland for a helicopter crash that killed four people in 2008, claiming the mistakes of a state-employed pilot, not federal air-traffic controllers, directly caused the accident. The U.S. claim, filed in federal court Friday, comes in response to a $4 million lawsuit filed by Maryland officials alleging that Federal Aviation Administration air-traffic controllers failed to properly direct Stephen H. Bunker, the pilot of the medevac helicopter carrying two automobile accident victims and two emergency medical technicians that crashed on its way to Andrews Air Force Base in rainy weather Sept.
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NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and Tanya Jones and TaNoah Morgan and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1997
With 40 years of flying between them, John A. Vick II and Reuel A. Cochrane II, were experts, flying fanatics at ease behind the controls of a small plane.It appears that pilot error was to blame for the crash of a Cessna 152 at Lee Airport in Edgewater on Sunday that killed them."There's nothing that we've found at this point that indicates a mechanical malfunction," said Brian Rayner, air safety investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board.It could be six months before Rayner presents findings to the the board, which will then determine a cause for the accident.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Robert Little and Baltimore Sun reporters | October 28, 2009
A state police helicopter pilot's decision to make a rapid descent in an attempt to see better in fog was the chief cause of the medevac crash that killed four people last year near Andrews Air Force Base, the National Transportation Safety Board concluded. The board said Steven Bunker of Waldorf, who was killed in the Sept. 28, 2008, crash, failed to stop the descent at the proper altitude. The NTSB found no mechanical problems and determined that the helicopter's navigational instruments were working properly.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Christian Ewell and Dennis O'Brien and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer D. Quentin Wilber contributed to this article | August 26, 1997
The sightseeing plane that plunged into the waters off Ocean City on Sunday killing all three people aboard was operated by a small company that has had four other fatal accidents since 1983, the firm's owner said yesterday.The previous fatalities, all due to pilot error and in planes carrying advertising banners, "had nothing to do with the biplane business," said Ocean Aerial Ads owner Robert Bunting. "That was the banner business, which is entirely different."Pilots who fly sightseers in biplanes are more experienced than those who fly planes carrying advertising banners, Bunting said.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2001
Coast Guard investigators say pilot error probably caused the Bay Titan to capsize in the Delaware River on Friday, causing the death of one crew member and blocking shipping traffic in the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal for up to a week. Officials also are investigating whether the oceangoing tugboat was suited for the job of towing the Domino Sugar barge involved in the accident. Though mariners familiar with the incident say the tug had plenty of horsepower and had performed the task before, the barge is normally pushed by a larger vessel equipped with an upper wheelhouse from which the pilot has better visibility during tight maneuvers.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 16, 1990
It's another weekend of disaster programming at NBC.Last weekend NBC won a slim victory over "Call Me Anna," Patty Duke's story, with "The Big One: The Great Los Angeles Earthquake."This weekend, it's a plane crash that is featured in "Crash: The Mystery of Flight 1501," at 9 p.m. Sunday on WMAR-TV (Channel 2). The death toll in this one is 131 persons.That is not counting any viewers who might die of boredom watching Cheryl Ladd schlepp through this clunker.Like Joanna Kern in "Earthquake," Ladd plays a woman of character at odds with the system.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Robert Little and Baltimore Sun reporters | October 28, 2009
A state police helicopter pilot's decision to make a rapid descent in an attempt to see better in fog was the chief cause of the medevac crash that killed four people last year near Andrews Air Force Base, the National Transportation Safety Board concluded. The board said Steven Bunker of Waldorf, who was killed in the Sept. 28, 2008, crash, failed to stop the descent at the proper altitude. The NTSB found no mechanical problems and determined that the helicopter's navigational instruments were working properly.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Yesterday's tragedy over Iraq puts a harsh spotlight on the United States' determination to keep punishing Saddam Hussein's regime at a time when that policy is already under strain.Driven by commercial and political self-interest, France, Russia and even a couple of Persian Gulf monarchies have begun to retreat from a U.S.-led coalition that since 1991 has blocked any easing of sanctions against Iraq or the strict enforcement of no-fly zones innorthern and southern Iraq.The commercial embargo is what has prevented Baghdad from emerging anew as a major oil exporter.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1996
The pilot of a twin-engine airplane that crashed late Friday near Riviera Beach may have misjudged how much fuel the craft needed, the passenger said yesterday."
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,Los Angeles Times | March 17, 2007
LONDON -- The death of a British lance corporal whose armored vehicle was mistakenly incinerated by a U.S. warplane in Iraq in 2003 was "criminal" and "entirely avoidable," a coroner ruled yesterday. The British inquest's search for investigative material on the case was marked by repeated military roadblocks, but Assistant Deputy Coroner Andrew Walker concluded that the friendly-fire incident showed evidence of error on the part of U.S. pilots. Contradicting the findings of a U.S. inquiry, which concluded that the incident was a "tragic accident," the Oxfordshire examiner said the pilots should have flown lower in order to positively identify the British convoy, which they believed to be Iraqi, before opening fire.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2001
Coast Guard investigators say pilot error probably caused the Bay Titan to capsize in the Delaware River on Friday, causing the death of one crew member and blocking shipping traffic in the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal for up to a week. Officials also are investigating whether the oceangoing tugboat was suited for the job of towing the Domino Sugar barge involved in the accident. Though mariners familiar with the incident say the tug had plenty of horsepower and had performed the task before, the barge is normally pushed by a larger vessel equipped with an upper wheelhouse from which the pilot has better visibility during tight maneuvers.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1997
A Baltimore pilot was seriously injured yesterday when his single-engine plane crashed into dense woods about 400 yards east of the runway at Clearview Airpark near Westminster.Jerome Lamprecht, 72, of the 1200 block of W. Lake Ave. was taken by state MedEvac helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where he was in serious but stable condition, a hospital spokeswoman said last night.No one on the ground was injured, state police said.Federal Aviation Administration officials were called to investigate, but police said pilot error appeared to have caused the crash at 2: 18 p.m.Lowell Seal, who has owned and operated Clearview Airpark for about 25 years, said he was standing near the runway when a red and white Beechcraft Bonanza began to land downwind, meaning it approached the 1,845-foot runway from the northwest with a tail wind of about 8 to 10 knots.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Christian Ewell and Dennis O'Brien and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer D. Quentin Wilber contributed to this article | August 26, 1997
The sightseeing plane that plunged into the waters off Ocean City on Sunday killing all three people aboard was operated by a small company that has had four other fatal accidents since 1983, the firm's owner said yesterday.The previous fatalities, all due to pilot error and in planes carrying advertising banners, "had nothing to do with the biplane business," said Ocean Aerial Ads owner Robert Bunting. "That was the banner business, which is entirely different."Pilots who fly sightseers in biplanes are more experienced than those who fly planes carrying advertising banners, Bunting said.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and Tanya Jones and TaNoah Morgan and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1997
With 40 years of flying between them, John A. Vick II and Reuel A. Cochrane II, were experts, flying fanatics at ease behind the controls of a small plane.It appears that pilot error was to blame for the crash of a Cessna 152 at Lee Airport in Edgewater on Sunday that killed them."There's nothing that we've found at this point that indicates a mechanical malfunction," said Brian Rayner, air safety investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board.It could be six months before Rayner presents findings to the the board, which will then determine a cause for the accident.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1996
The pilot of a twin-engine airplane that crashed late Friday near Riviera Beach may have misjudged how much fuel the craft needed, the passenger said yesterday."
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
The federal government is blaming the state of Maryland for a helicopter crash that killed four people in 2008, claiming the mistakes of a state-employed pilot, not federal air-traffic controllers, directly caused the accident. The U.S. claim, filed in federal court Friday, comes in response to a $4 million lawsuit filed by Maryland officials alleging that Federal Aviation Administration air-traffic controllers failed to properly direct Stephen H. Bunker, the pilot of the medevac helicopter carrying two automobile accident victims and two emergency medical technicians that crashed on its way to Andrews Air Force Base in rainy weather Sept.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Yesterday's tragedy over Iraq puts a harsh spotlight on the United States' determination to keep punishing Saddam Hussein's regime at a time when that policy is already under strain.Driven by commercial and political self-interest, France, Russia and even a couple of Persian Gulf monarchies have begun to retreat from a U.S.-led coalition that since 1991 has blocked any easing of sanctions against Iraq or the strict enforcement of no-fly zones innorthern and southern Iraq.The commercial embargo is what has prevented Baghdad from emerging anew as a major oil exporter.
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