Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPilot
IN THE NEWS

Pilot

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 4, 2010
- Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger has flown his final flight. The pilot who landed a US Airways plane safely on the Hudson River last January said Wednesday he is retiring after 30 years and plans to spend some of his time pressing for more flight safety. "My message going forward is that I want to remind everyone in the aviation industry - especially those who manage aviation companies and those who regulate aviation - that we owe it to our passengers to keep learning how to do it better," he said at a news conference shortly after his last flight landed at Charlotte Douglas International Airport.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
As school assemblies go, this one was a winner. Austin Machin listened to a Blue Angels pilot speak for an hour at the Dundalk and Sollers Point high schools Friday, walked out and said, "I am at a loss for words about how awesome that was. " The 16-year-old wants to join the Navy SEALs right out of high school, and for him, the pilot was about as good a recruitment tool as he could imagine. Students from Dundalk and Sollers Point had dozens of predictable questions for Blue Angels pilot Lt. Mark Tedrow, who is in town for the Star-Spangled Spectacular, a celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore and the writing of what would become the national anthem.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
The automatic distress signal came in to the Coast Guard about 10:30 p.m. Thursday: A D.C. Air National Guard pilot had ejected from a fighter jet some 35 miles off Chincoteague Island in Virginia. As a rescue team sprang into action, another fighter pilot was flying a damaged F-16C Fighting Falcon back to the D.C. air guard's headquarters at Joint Base Andrews in Prince George's County. Two others were circling the site where the fighters had collided. One jet was lost, to the likely tune of more than $20 million, and another was damaged.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
For six straight hours for four straight afternoons during one of the largest ship-hosting events in Baltimore history, all water traffic within a large rectangle in the middle of the harbor is being completely restricted by a cadre of law enforcement agencies. No tall ships, no personal watercraft, no dinghys. Period. Only the icebreaker A.V. Sandusky of the Maryland Natural Resources Police and the Coast Guard cutter James Rankin are allowed in the so-called box, and even they are not allowed to move.
EXPLORE
October 7, 2012
Carroll County Public Library announced this week that the Westminster Library branch, 50 E. Main St., Westminster, is beginning Sunday operations, starting Oct. 7. The library will be open 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays through April 28 (closed December 23 and March 31). Library officials said the Sunday hours are a pilot project, made possible in partnership with the City of Westminster. Other hours at Westminster are Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8:45 p.m.; and Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.    
NEWS
January 16, 2012
A pilot on his way home to Maine made an emergency landing in a Maryland field when his small plane ran out of gas. The Frederick News-Post reported that the man made an emergency landing Sunday afternoon in Frederick. No one was injured. A neighbor whose husband talked to the pilot told the paper the man was trying to land at Frederick Municipal Airport when he was told to circle until the runway was available. He said he ran out of gas in the tank he was using and didn't have time to switch to another.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
The pilot involved in a fatal northeastern Pennsylvania helicopter crash that killed five people, including three Marylanders, didn't follow federal regulations when planning and making the flight, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a preliminary report. The investigators said the pilot on the trip, which ended in a crash in Noxen, Pa., near Scranton, was not certified to fly using only on-board instruments — a type of advanced certification required when visibility is low. The pilot also did not file a flight plan with federal officials for the trip, investigators said.
NEWS
March 1, 2010
State police identified the pilot who was found dead at the scene of a plane crash in Edgewater on Saturday as 53-year-old Joseph Luther Kelly III of Annapolis. Firefighters arrived at 24 Warehouse Creek Lane to find the wreckage of the single-engine 1962 V-35 Beechcraft Bonanza Model P engulfed in flames fewer than 30 feet from a house in what a police spokesman described as a sparsely populated neighborhood. The National Transportation Safety Board, the Federal Aviation Administration and the Maryland State Police are investigating.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Charter pilot Martin Campanella said he thought he was doing the right thing when he refused to fly a plane he believed was unsafe. The Forest Hill resident said he was fired after he made an emergency landing with several passengers aboard a 10-seat corporate jet and then refused to fly the damaged aircraft to the charter company's headquarters. After getting fired, he said, he nearly lost his house and struggled with mounting anxiety and family tension. Now an administrative law judge for the U.S. Department of Labor decided the employer violated a federal law that prevents employment-related retaliation against air carrier employees acting in the interest of safety.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Capt. H. Russell "Russ" Miller III, a retired Chesapeake Bay pilot who spent more than four decades guiding ships through the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal and from Baltimore to Cape Henry, Va., died Wednesday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime North Baltimore resident was 73. The son of H. Russell Miller Jr., a bay pilot, and Mary Jane Sweitzer Miller, a homemaker, Harry Russell Miller III was born in Baltimore and raised in Govans. He was a 1959 graduate of Loyola High School, where he was an outstanding basketball player.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Anne Arundel County public schools will launch a pilot program in the new school year giving some elementary school students instruction in specific themes, including global studies, arts and the humanities, and the use of science and technology in society. Superintendent George Arlotto said Thursday each of the nine elementary schools that feed into North County High School will take part in the program, dubbed Triple E: Enhancing Elementary Excellence. It will begin Sept. 29, about a month after Monday's start of the school year.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Visitors, employees and neighbors of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport now have a new option for enjoying the 12.5-mile trail that loops around the airport's Anne Arundel County property. The Boston-based bikeshare company Zagster, working with BWI, has installed a dock for 10 of its bicycles outside the airport's international terminal, near the light rail station. They are available for rental for $5 a day. Long-term passes for regular use cost $15 a month or $50 a year. Officials envision the bikes being used by airport travelers with time to kill and an urge to get outside, employees looking for a bit of exercise on a break or after work, and neighbors looking to take better advantage of the trail.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2014
The University of Maryland, University College has a history of experimentation. With its roots in a 1920s night school, the institution expanded in the 1940s and '50s into Europe and Asia to educate military personnel. Then as the Internet flourished, it embraced online learning. Now the state university is experimenting again. This month, President Javier Miyares unveiled a proposal from a group of business leaders he assembled that would tie the university's future more closely to the private sector.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Capt. H. Russell "Russ" Miller III, a retired Chesapeake Bay pilot who spent more than four decades guiding ships through the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal and from Baltimore to Cape Henry, Va., died Wednesday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime North Baltimore resident was 73. The son of H. Russell Miller Jr., a bay pilot, and Mary Jane Sweitzer Miller, a homemaker, Harry Russell Miller III was born in Baltimore and raised in Govans. He was a 1959 graduate of Loyola High School, where he was an outstanding basketball player.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Changes to Baltimore's Head Start this fall will provide longer days and an extended school year for hundreds of children in its care, a move intended to help low-income parents free up time for work and boost the youngsters' development. Under a federal pilot initiative that gives the city more local control over the early education program, Head Start also will shift its focus to younger children by serving more of them, transferring many older children to pre-K programs in city schools.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
Maryland State Police today released more details about Sunday's helicopter crash that left two people with minor injuries at Hart-Miller Island near Essex. The helicopter, a Brantley B-2B, experienced a mechanical problem Sunday afternoon, state police said in a news release. The pilot told police that he tried to troubleshoot the problem but could not identify it, and the helicopter made a "hard landing," rolling onto its left side. The pilot and a passenger were uninjured aside from a few "bumps and scratches," according to Baltimore County police spokesman Cpl. John Wachter.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Baltimore City will spend nearly $578,000 on a pilot program to provide large trash cans to 9,250 households, following approval by the city's spending panel Wednesday. The Board of Estimates awarded the project - designed to control the city's rat population and reduce litter - to the Statesville, N.C.-based company, Toter. If the program is successful, it could be scaled citywide for approximately $10 million, according to the city's Bureau of Solid Waste. Residents in two communities will receive the 65-gallon containers, which will come on wheels and be equipped with a tracking device.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
A pilot working for an Eastern Shore company that flies advertising banners over Ocean City beaches each summer was killed Thursday after his plane crashed on a golf course in Worcester County, according to Maryland State Police. The pilot, identified by police as Garett Colona, 23, of the 5000 block of Sharptown Road in Rhodesdale, was a "super guy" beloved by all the company's other pilots, said Bob Bunting, owner of plane operator Ocean Aerial Ads Thursday afternoon. "This was one of the nicest individuals I've ever known in my life," Bunting said.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 25, 2014
Amid reports that he not only tolerated but encouraged a nasty work environment rife with sex jokes and pornography, the Navy has relieved a two-time commander of the Blue Angels of his current post. Capt. Gregory McWherter has been fired as executive officer of Naval Base Coronado near San Diego and reassigned to other duties, the Navy said. He was last commander of the Blue Angels in 2012, brought back to straighten things up after the Blue Angels performed too close to the ground in a show.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
For years, the city has fought blight with excavators, clawing down abandoned and decrepit buildings. This month, it started to attack its vacant home problem by hand, signing off on a plan to take apart a selection of houses brick by brick. Proponents say the program will be able to pay for the added labor expense by selling the salvaged materials, especially Baltimore's iconic red brick. They believe the venture will help turn the city's multimillion-dollar demolition program into an environmentally friendly job creator, without costing much more than a typical tear-down.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.