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Pilgrimage

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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1998
More than 1,800 Roman Catholics from the Archdiocese of Baltimore will assemble today in a biennial pilgrimage to the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington.The pilgrims represent Catholics in approximately 55 parishes in the archdiocese from as far as Westernport in Allegany County. They will join Cardinal William H. Keeler, archbishop of the archdiocese, for a day of spiritual activities that will include the recitation of the rosary, confession and the celebration of Mass.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
The roadside root beer stand's orange contours memorialize this venerated shrine to a different era. Its fans make pilgrimages to this Stewart's franchise on Pulaski Highway, a truck-battered stretch of U.S. 40 in eastern Baltimore County, to recall the food experiences of their youth. This is the place where it seemed a little cooler in the days before broiling city neighborhoods such as Highlandtown or Canton had air conditioning. Suburban Rosedale was the summer destination when the sun was bright, the humidity was high and school was a distant notion.
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NEWS
By George Weigel | March 22, 2000
On June 29, 1999, Pope John Paul II published a letter to those preparing to celebrate the Great Jubilee of 2000, explaining why he intended to make a yearlong pilgrimage to the great sites of biblical history. Those sites are typically associated these days with the tangled politics of the Middle East. In his letter, however, Pope John Paul insisted that his "would be an exclusively religious pilgrimage in its nature and purposes," and added that he "would be saddened if anyone were to attach other meanings to this plan of mine."
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
In the usual course of life's events, most people go to school. Very few people, however, buy a schoolhouse and call it home. In the usual course of life's events, most people go to school. Very few people, however, buy a schoolhouse and call it home. "It's old and unusual, but wears its age so well," said Heather Wirth, who along with her husband, Steve Bogucki, purchased the circa-1888, two-room schoolhouse in Parkton on St. Patrick's Day 1990. "It's fun living in a building with a past that's had so many other uses - first as a school, then as a duplex, then as an antiques shop [and]
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1998
Bleary-eyed Baltimoreans peered from behind their doors or stood barefoot on their rowhouse steps and gawked. The early-morning sidewalk brigade, dog walkers and drug dealers, trash collectors and cops, paused in their business at the sound of drumming and chanting.The Interfaith Pilgrimage of the Middle Passage had come to town.A traveling history show of diverse Americans, supported by a drumming corps of Buddhist monks, is on a year-long, 7,000-mile journey to retrace the routes of the slave trade and ponder its tragic legacy.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 20, 2000
JERUSALEM -- Pope John Paul II begins an historic pilgrimage to the Holy Land today with a heavy task of soothing the poor in spirit in a region perpetually torn by conflict. The pontiff's seven-day visit to Jordan, Israel and the Palestinian territories fulfills his longtime dream of praying in the cradle of Christianity 2,000 years after Jesus was born. But from the moment he lands, Pope John Paul II will face pressures from Christians, Muslims and Jews, all smarting from past and present injustices.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 26, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dillard's Inc.'s dismissal of a department store employee because she missed work to go on a religious pilgrimage was not religious discrimination, a federal appeals court has ruled.The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a lower court decision that Dillard's, a 250-store chain, owed Mary Tiano more than $16,000 in back wages for refusing to restore her job when she returned from a pilgrimage to the former Yugoslavia.The three-judge panel in San Francisco ruled that Tiano, a Roman Catholic, couldn't prove religious bias because she didn't show that the timing of the pilgrimage was part of a religious calling rather than a personal preference.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2001
Hundreds of young people rallied at Rash Field yesterday, opening Holy Week with prayers, hymns and a pilgrimage through the streets of downtown. The atmosphere at the eighth annual Youth Pilgrimage was as festive as a pep rally, but the cheers were for a Roman Catholic cardinal and for teen-agers costumed as saints. "Maybe we can understand better the journey Christ had to make and also show the people of Baltimore that we are strong in our faith and that so many are involved in church," said 17-year-old Matt Thomas of Bel Air, who came carrying a handful of rocks and dressed as St. Stephen, the first martyr.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | July 8, 1991
She has stared at a pulsating sun and not burned her eyes.She has smelled the sweetness of roses as she climbed the mountain, a scentshe believed marked the presence of the Virgin Mary.Now Ruth VonDenBosch, owner of a religious bookstore in Linthicum, is planning her fourth trip to Medjugorje, the small Yugoslavian town where for the past 10 years Mary, the mother of Jesus, has reportedly appeared to young visionaries."It's a calling. You hunger forit. I haven't been anywhere else on this Earth (where)
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | April 1, 2007
The sound of more than a thousand singing voices spilled out the doors of St. Casimir Church in Canton yesterday afternoon as 10 young people emerged into the sunshine carrying a 10-foot wooden cross on their shoulders. Cardinal William H. Keeler, archbishop of Baltimore, emerged next with several other members of the clergy. And then hundreds of young Catholics poured out onto the sidewalk and started proceeding down the street. Mae Richardson, coordinator of youth ministry for Sacred Heart Parish of Glyndon, looked at the noisy, briskly moving sea of young people stretching for blocks along the edge of Patterson Park.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
As a newborn, Elyssa Baxter was brought home to her family's restored log house in McLean, Va. Seventy-two years later, not only would she and her husband own a similar restored log home in Parkton, but they would be invited to take part in the 77th annual Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage, whose 2014 theme is "extraordinary historic properties. " "This home carries on a family tradition and the interest of my mother and father to own and maintain a log cabin," said Baxter, a former art teacher.
EXPLORE
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 10, 2013
For 32 years after noted artist Grace Turnbull died in 1976, the house that she built in Guilford in 1928 sat empty, except for a few erstwhile renters - and some squirrels in the roof. Then, in 2008, manufacturing executive Douglas Hamilton III and his wife, Angela, a procurement manager, bought the six-bedroom, five-bath Spanish Colonial with Bermuda influences, in the 200 block of Chancery Road. But the Hamiltons didn't move in until December 2011, because the house, though uniquely artistic, was antiquated, poorly laid out and in ill repair.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
From the dentils that punctuate the roofline to the wide staircase leading upstairs, the home of Gretchen and A. Denis Clift is a classic. And it's in an Annapolis community where architecture is distinctive, gardens are gracious and century-old trees shade winding streets. The house offers views of the Severn River through original windows of rippled glass and looks over sections of Wardour. Even though the neighborhood is in the city of Annapolis, it feels anything but urban.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
Derek Gabbard wasn't dreaming of California when he sought to raise investment capital for his Baltimore-based cybersecurity firm. But the CEO of Lookingglass Cyber Solutions lucked out with a connection to venture capitalists in the state that dwarfs all others in terms of venture capital. With a San Francisco investment firm taking the lead on the investment and a Maryland firm following, Gabbard recently raised $5 million. Such deals, where Mid-Atlantic technology companies straddle both coasts for investors, have been cropping up lately, though the dynamics underlying them vary.
NEWS
January 13, 2012
Washington 'Annie Leibovitz: Pilgrimage' This exhibition of one of America's best-known living photographers showcases more than 70 photographs taken between April 2009 and May 2011. The display is unusual because unlike much of the artist's works, including her staged and carefully lit portraits for magazines and advertising clients, these photos feature no people. Rather, the photographs here, in the words of the exhibitors, "were taken simply because Leibovitz was moved by the subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | December 12, 2011
The countdown to the season finale has begun on “Terra Nova,” and God help me, at this point, I am invested in this outcome. Gosh, where to begin. Well, Lucas is back, with his CrazySexyMath, insane blue eyes and -- unexpectedly -- some pretty prominent pectorals. The 11 th pilgrimage is days away, putting the entirety of Terra Nova on high alert, with good reason. Lucas has finally perfected his calculations, which would allow him to travel forward in time, as well as backward.
FEATURES
By Paul Langner and Paul Langner,BOSTON GLOBE | December 15, 1996
The little town of Malvern Link, England -- part of the larger town of Great Malvern actually -- just at the foot of the Malvern Hills in west central England, is a place of pilgrimage to members of a peculiar brotherhood.That is the brotherhood of Morgan drivers, whose devotion to the elegant but uncomfortable British sports car baffles most people, but unites the drivers in a sort of cult with Spartan values.Others might say they are masochists and should have their heads examined. No matter.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 18, 1997
NORTHERN NEGEV, Israel -- The jewels of an Israeli spring bloom on a desert hillside flanked by a busy highway. Black irises grow in clumps beneath high-tension wires, their iridescent petals luring nature lovers like the bees alighting on their velvety interiors. When botanist Ori Fragman leads a spring trek, he saves the best for last -- these wine-dark flowers unique to Israel sprouting amid rocks and desert scrub."My beloved ones," Fragman says. "They bloom for a day or two."Short-lived and stubborn, fragile and fecund, they reflect the contradictions of a Middle Eastern spring.
NEWS
By Jennifer Lynch | July 28, 2011
A'ight, Bal'more. It's that time of year again. Time to go downy ocean, hon. I have been goin' downy ocean for 38 years, never missed a year. As a child, vacation was the best week of the year. The anticipation was even better. For weeks leading up to the trip, my mother would bake dozens upon dozens of sweets. She and my aunt would go grocery shopping and fill two or three carts full of food until they were so overstuffed that our job as kids was rush around behind them like ball boys and girls, picking up any stray items that fell out as they tried to steer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 9, 2011
In case you're wondering, Peter Angelos' involvement in this year's mayoral race didn't begin or end with last week's surprising letter to the editor . A bunch of declared challengers trooped into Angelos' office about two weeks ago. They came in separately, one day after the next, seeking campaign cash, a source tells me. The supplicants were: former city Planning Director Otis Rolley , City Councilman Carl Stokes and former Councilman...
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