Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPileggi
IN THE NEWS

Pileggi

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2002
Mercantile Bankshares Corp., continuing with plans to add muscle to its asset-management businesses, announced yesterday that a veteran of the mutual fund industry will head two important subsidiaries. The bank named John J. Pileggi, 43, as president and chief executive officer of its Mercantile Capital Advisors Inc. and Hopkins Plaza Securities Inc., units. The appointment is effective immediately. "This is another piece of evidence that Mercantile is positioning itself to be a major player in the trust and asset management businesses," said Gerard S. Cassidy, a banking analyst with RBC Capital Markets, Portland, Maine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
Mercantile Bankshares Corp. agreed to pay former executive John J. Pileggi $1.3 million to settle lawsuits over his firing for alleged fraud and breach of contract. The Baltimore-based banking company, its chairman and chief executive, Edward J. Kelly III, and Pileggi agreed to dismiss all claims and provide full releases from any future claims, the bank disclosed yesterday in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Mercantile agreed to pay Pileggi the money "in respect of" his employment contract as well as "certain related benefits" and a portion of his legal fees, subject to certain conditions, the document stated.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2004
John J. Pileggi, a former Mercantile Bankshares executive embroiled in a bitter legal fight with his former employer, has filed a motion in court to dismiss the bulk of the charges in the bank's $8 million lawsuit against him. Pileggi, who was chairman of Mercantile's wealth management division, was fired in the spring. The bank said he had withheld from his superiors information that the mother of one of his employees stood to gain a nearly six-figure fee if the bank used a firm she recommended to oversee investments in a Mercantile hedge fund.
BUSINESS
By BILL ATKINSON | January 28, 2005
FOR A BIG-TIME New York lawyer and investment banker, stepping in to run Mercantile Bankshares should have been a piece of cake. It has been anything but easy for Ned Kelly. Since Edward J. Kelly III took over in March 2001, he has had to take some bold steps to run the bank the way he sees fit. He nudged out H. Furlong Baldwin, the man who ran Mercantile for 25 years and brought Kelly to Baltimore. The two are no longer on speaking terms. He ousted fellow New Yorker Wallace Mathai-Davis, his choice to run the bank's wealth management division, because of personality clashes.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2004
John J. Pileggi, one of two Mercantile Bankshares Corp. executives fired last March in an ethics flap, sued the bank for $240 million yesterday, claiming that his dismissal had deprived him of a potential payout in the event that Mercantile was sold. In his suit filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, Pileggi said that the bank's chief executive had held regular meetings with a senior officer of another Baltimore bank to explore a possible merger. He also alleged that representatives of two investment banking firms told Mercantile board members in January that the best way to enhance shareholder value was to sell the company.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
Mercantile Bankshares Corp. agreed to pay former executive John J. Pileggi $1.3 million to settle lawsuits over his firing for alleged fraud and breach of contract. The Baltimore-based banking company, its chairman and chief executive, Edward J. Kelly III, and Pileggi agreed to dismiss all claims and provide full releases from any future claims, the bank disclosed yesterday in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Mercantile agreed to pay Pileggi the money "in respect of" his employment contract as well as "certain related benefits" and a portion of his legal fees, subject to certain conditions, the document stated.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
Mercantile Bankshares Corp. has sued a former top executive, the latest salvo in a case alleging double-dealing and illicit sex in the button-down world of Baltimore banking. Mercantile, the state's largest independently owned bank, sued former employee John J. Pileggi for more than $8 million in Baltimore Circuit Court this week, two months after Pileggi sued the bank for $240 million over his dismissal in the spring. In a 51-page lawsuit filed Monday, the bank alleged that Pileggi intentionally withheld from his superiors information that the mother of one of his employees stood to gain a nearly six-figure fee if the bank used a firm she recommended to oversee investments in a hedge fund.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 6, 2004
ON FEB. 19, 2002, Mercantile Bankshares Corp. announced the hiring of John J. Pileggi as president and chief executive of two important asset-management units. Mercantile bosses praised Pileggi's leadership, aggressiveness and success in the city where, if you can make it there, you can make it anywhere. Even Baltimore. Pileggi called himself "a crazy guy from New York." His new boss at Mercantile, Wallace Mathai-Davis, described Pileggi as "a tough-minded guy from New York - he's a Wall Street guy."
NEWS
July 1, 2003
On Monday, June 30, 2003, SISTER MARY COIA, R.S.M.; beloved member of The Sisters of Mercy; beloved daughter of Frederico and Carmela Coia; loving sister of Frederic A. and Joseph L. Coia and Ann Pileggi; aunt of Patti Herbert, Theresa, Gene, and Fred Coia and John Pileggi; five grand-nieces and four grand-nephews; sister of the late Florence Coia. Friends may call at the Villa, 6806 Bellona Avenue, on Tuesday, from 10 to 11 A.M. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at the Villa at 10 A.M. Interment will be in New Jersey.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2004
Mercantile Bankshares Corp., a venerable Baltimore bank that has for generations managed the fortunes of some of Maryland's wealthiest families, fired two top executives yesterday for not disclosing that the mother of one stood to benefit from the bank's selection of an advisory firm for one of its investment funds. The fired executives are John J. Pileggi, who was named chief executive of Mercantile's Investment and Wealth Management division in a management shake-up last summer, and Michael R. Donnell, a division senior vice president.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2004
Mercantile Bankshares Corp., the Baltimore banking company whose wealth management division has been rocked by dismissals and dueling lawsuits, said yesterday that it has hired a former Mercantile executive to head the unit. Jay M. Wilson, a founder and general partner of Spring Capital Partners LP, a private equity fund in Baltimore, has been named a vice chairman of the state's largest independently owned banking company. He will be responsible for the investment and wealth management division when he takes over in January and is expected to become a director of the company.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2004
John J. Pileggi, a former Mercantile Bankshares executive embroiled in a bitter legal fight with his former employer, has filed a motion in court to dismiss the bulk of the charges in the bank's $8 million lawsuit against him. Pileggi, who was chairman of Mercantile's wealth management division, was fired in the spring. The bank said he had withheld from his superiors information that the mother of one of his employees stood to gain a nearly six-figure fee if the bank used a firm she recommended to oversee investments in a Mercantile hedge fund.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Stacey Hirsh and Bill Atkinson and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
John J. Pileggi was annoyed about having to attend a meeting on Christmas Eve with other top executives of Baltimore's Mercantile Bankshares Corp., and he minced no words about his disgust in an e-mail to a colleague in December. "I ... hate everything right now," Pileggi wrote in an electronic missive that disparaged some coworkers. "Mason is going to be at this Xmas Eve meeting. Given I hate him, Ried and Troupe, and I have to ... come in on that day for this, he says the wrong thing and he spits teeth."
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 6, 2004
ON FEB. 19, 2002, Mercantile Bankshares Corp. announced the hiring of John J. Pileggi as president and chief executive of two important asset-management units. Mercantile bosses praised Pileggi's leadership, aggressiveness and success in the city where, if you can make it there, you can make it anywhere. Even Baltimore. Pileggi called himself "a crazy guy from New York." His new boss at Mercantile, Wallace Mathai-Davis, described Pileggi as "a tough-minded guy from New York - he's a Wall Street guy."
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
Mercantile Bankshares Corp. has sued a former top executive, the latest salvo in a case alleging double-dealing and illicit sex in the button-down world of Baltimore banking. Mercantile, the state's largest independently owned bank, sued former employee John J. Pileggi for more than $8 million in Baltimore Circuit Court this week, two months after Pileggi sued the bank for $240 million over his dismissal in the spring. In a 51-page lawsuit filed Monday, the bank alleged that Pileggi intentionally withheld from his superiors information that the mother of one of his employees stood to gain a nearly six-figure fee if the bank used a firm she recommended to oversee investments in a hedge fund.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2004
John J. Pileggi, one of two Mercantile Bankshares Corp. executives fired last March in an ethics flap, sued the bank for $240 million yesterday, claiming that his dismissal had deprived him of a potential payout in the event that Mercantile was sold. In his suit filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, Pileggi said that the bank's chief executive had held regular meetings with a senior officer of another Baltimore bank to explore a possible merger. He also alleged that representatives of two investment banking firms told Mercantile board members in January that the best way to enhance shareholder value was to sell the company.
BUSINESS
By BILL ATKINSON | January 28, 2005
FOR A BIG-TIME New York lawyer and investment banker, stepping in to run Mercantile Bankshares should have been a piece of cake. It has been anything but easy for Ned Kelly. Since Edward J. Kelly III took over in March 2001, he has had to take some bold steps to run the bank the way he sees fit. He nudged out H. Furlong Baldwin, the man who ran Mercantile for 25 years and brought Kelly to Baltimore. The two are no longer on speaking terms. He ousted fellow New Yorker Wallace Mathai-Davis, his choice to run the bank's wealth management division, because of personality clashes.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Stacey Hirsh and Bill Atkinson and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
John J. Pileggi was annoyed about having to attend a meeting on Christmas Eve with other top executives of Baltimore's Mercantile Bankshares Corp., and he minced no words about his disgust in an e-mail to a colleague in December. "I ... hate everything right now," Pileggi wrote in an electronic missive that disparaged some coworkers. "Mason is going to be at this Xmas Eve meeting. Given I hate him, Ried and Troupe, and I have to ... come in on that day for this, he says the wrong thing and he spits teeth."
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | March 24, 2004
MERCANTILE Bankshares Corp.'s revised conduct code, adopted by the company's board March 9, directs employees approaching the ethics border to ask some questions: "Can I defend my action with a clear conscience?" "Are my actions honest in every respect?" And, the biggest test: "Would I be proud to read about my action in the newspaper?" Two days after certifying the manifesto, Mercantile bosses got an outside tip about a questionable payment to the mother of a senior vice president.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2004
Mercantile Bankshares Corp., a venerable Baltimore bank that has for generations managed the fortunes of some of Maryland's wealthiest families, fired two top executives yesterday for not disclosing that the mother of one stood to benefit from the bank's selection of an advisory firm for one of its investment funds. The fired executives are John J. Pileggi, who was named chief executive of Mercantile's Investment and Wealth Management division in a management shake-up last summer, and Michael R. Donnell, a division senior vice president.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.