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October 2, 1991
Satisfy hungry appetites with delicious harvest barley pilaf. Pearl barley is available in the rice and noodle aisle of most grocery stores. Add spicy sausage to create a hearty main dish )) meal.F: This recipe is from the National Barley Foods Council.Harvest Barley Pilaf1 cup pearl barley3 tablespoons butter or margarine1/2 cup each chopped onion and celery1 clove garlic, minced1/2 cup diced green pepper1 16-ounce can stewed tomatoes2 cups water1/2 teaspoon thyme1/2 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon pepper1/2 pound chorizo or spicy sausage, sauteed and slicedIn large saucepan, saute barley, onion, celery, garlic and pepper in butter over medium heat, until barley is lightly browned.
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NEWS
By SANDRA PINCKNEY | April 6, 2008
No one could roast a chicken like my mother. No one. It was beautifully browned on the outside, moist on the inside, and had just the right amount of seasonings. Ask for her recipe? "Oh, Sandra, I don't know ... I just use a little onion and garlic powder, pepper and salt ... poultry needs lots of salt. Then just put it in the oven," she would say, her voice rising at the end, as if to say, `Come on, it's so simple, there's nothing to it!' " But there was a lot more to it, I would learn over the years.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | April 22, 1992
Like a lot of the world's oldest ideas, pilaf is completely up-to-date. The idea of combining rice with vegetables and seafood or meat for a one-dish meal, which may have originated in the rice-growing regions of the Middle East, is perfect for today's health-conscious, time-sensitive home cooks."
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | August 15, 2007
In India, tandoori (pronounced than-DOOR-ee) is a popular style of grilling. The tall, cylindrical oven made of brick or clay is used to cook breads, such as light and puffy naan, as well as meats that cook over flames in excess of 500 degrees. This Grilled Tandoori-Style Steak With Summer Lentil Pilaf has something for meat eaters and vegetarians. Meat eaters can enjoy beef marinated in a tangy yogurt sauce, while vegetarians will appreciate the flavorful lentils, another Indian staple that is high in fiber.
FEATURES
By Carole Kotkin and Carole Kotkin,McClatchy-Tribune | July 7, 2007
When my cooking students complain that they can't make a good pot of rice, I suggest pilaf. Simple and practically foolproof, it's a delicious and versatile side dish. In a perfect pilaf, the grains of rice are firm and separate, not mushy and stuck together, and the texture is light and fluffy. Briefly sauteing the raw rice gives the grains a toasty flavor and helps to separate them. The rice will lose its translucency, and the starches on the outside will firm up and absorb the liquid slowly.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | April 22, 1992
"What you're looking for in a pilaf is for the grains to be very separate when they're cooked," says Mary Jo Hogue, test-kitchen manager for the U.S.A. Rice Council, a trade group.Any kind of rice will do, she says, but the best results often come with long-grain rice, which is four to five times as long as it is wide and tends to hold up better for long cooking times. (An exception is the Turkish recipe below, which calls for short-grain rice.)Pilafs are often one-dish meals, containing rice, vegetables and meat or fish, but they can also be meatless, for vegetarians or those abstaining from meat for religious reasons.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and By Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | December 8, 2002
Of all the steak joints in town," to paraphrase a famous movie line, you're not likely to be served as delicious and reasonably priced an entree as the steak dinner you can make at home. So why fight the restaurant noise and crowds this holiday season when what you want is a savory meal and good company? The only challenge you'll face with a steak menu is settling on your favorite cut of beef. Steaks offer a combination of flavor and tenderness in varying degrees. You may give up a little tenderness for more flavor, or you may prefer more chewy texture and less fat. That's a personal choice.
NEWS
March 5, 2000
For convenience, freeze stock in the quantities you use most often: quarts for soups, stews, pilaf and poaching or braising; 1- and 2-cup containers for sauces and deglazing. When freezing stock, leave an inch of headroom at the top of the container to allow liquid to expand as it freezes. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z Pub Date: 03/05/00
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | April 17, 1991
For an extra boost of nutrition and great taste, add plump, pitted prunes to your salad. Convenient, ready-to-use pitted prunes, made from dried plums, provide such nutrients as vitamin A, potassium, iron and dietary fiber, as well as sweet, fruit flavor.Citrus Rice Pilaf Salad 1 package (7.2 or 6.9 ounce-size) rice pilaf mix1 tablespoon vegetable oil1/2 cup orange juice1 cup halved pitted prunes, about 6 ounces1/2 cup sliced radishes1/2 cup sliced green onions1 tablespoon white wine vinegar1/2 to 1 teaspoon finely grated orange peelDash hot pepper sauceLettuce leavesCook rice pilaf mix (available in the rice aisle in most grocery stores)
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | April 11, 2007
The windows were rattling as the cold wind swirled recently. I was wishing for warmer weather and, with it, the fresh vegetables that come with it. But no English peas or baby artichokes were in sight. There were, however, frozen vegetables in the freezer and artichoke hearts in the cupboard. I combined them with a pilaf made with rice and ham. It wasn't a spring dish, but it satisfied my cravings. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
FEATURES
By Carole Kotkin and Carole Kotkin,McClatchy-Tribune | July 7, 2007
When my cooking students complain that they can't make a good pot of rice, I suggest pilaf. Simple and practically foolproof, it's a delicious and versatile side dish. In a perfect pilaf, the grains of rice are firm and separate, not mushy and stuck together, and the texture is light and fluffy. Briefly sauteing the raw rice gives the grains a toasty flavor and helps to separate them. The rice will lose its translucency, and the starches on the outside will firm up and absorb the liquid slowly.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | April 11, 2007
The windows were rattling as the cold wind swirled recently. I was wishing for warmer weather and, with it, the fresh vegetables that come with it. But no English peas or baby artichokes were in sight. There were, however, frozen vegetables in the freezer and artichoke hearts in the cupboard. I combined them with a pilaf made with rice and ham. It wasn't a spring dish, but it satisfied my cravings. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2003
As if to say that everything old is new again, here comes Marie Simmons writing about something ancient: rice. As dates are sketchy, suffice to say that rice was probably first cultivated in South Asia several thousand years ago, making it even older than the tomato aspic at the Woman's Industrial Exchange. So, what's new? Ingredient combinations, perhaps, as in Corn, Tomato and Rice Pudding With Chipotle Chile-Cheddar Custard or Fried Red Rice With Shiitakes and Bok Choy. In The Amazing World of Rice (William Morrow, 2003, $19.95)
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and By Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | December 8, 2002
Of all the steak joints in town," to paraphrase a famous movie line, you're not likely to be served as delicious and reasonably priced an entree as the steak dinner you can make at home. So why fight the restaurant noise and crowds this holiday season when what you want is a savory meal and good company? The only challenge you'll face with a steak menu is settling on your favorite cut of beef. Steaks offer a combination of flavor and tenderness in varying degrees. You may give up a little tenderness for more flavor, or you may prefer more chewy texture and less fat. That's a personal choice.
NEWS
March 5, 2000
For convenience, freeze stock in the quantities you use most often: quarts for soups, stews, pilaf and poaching or braising; 1- and 2-cup containers for sauces and deglazing. When freezing stock, leave an inch of headroom at the top of the container to allow liquid to expand as it freezes. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z Pub Date: 03/05/00
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | October 20, 1999
Rice mixes draw mixed reaction* Item: Betty Crocker rice mixes* What you get: About 2 1/2 servings* Cost: About $1.60* Preparation time: 20 to 25 minutes stove top, 25 to 30 minutes microwave* Review: Betty Crocker's newest rice mixes are a mixed bag. On the plus side, they contain no artificial flavors or preservatives. On the minus side, microwave cooking times appear to vary from the instructions, and, across the board, the flavors aren't consistent. The Garden Vegetable Pilaf was fresh and fluffy, but the Cheddar and Broccoli was a bit bland.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | January 17, 1999
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost- cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick.Sunday/FamilyGather the family for a meal of easy boneless Smothered Pork Loin Chops (see recipe)
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