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By Patrick Soran and Dan Klinglesmith and Patrick Soran and Dan Klinglesmith,Contributing Writers | July 4, 1993
Surely, it's the most remarkable excursion to Pikes Peak since Zebulon Pike himself spotted the snow-draped massif in 1807. On July 22, 1893 -- 100 years ago this month -- Katherine Lee Bates, a Massachusetts English teacher, boarded a covered wagon for a sightseeing trip up the 14,110-foot mountain. She came back with two lines of poetry spinning in her head: O beautiful for spacious skies, For amber waves of grain. It's a Colorado souvenir the entire nation now enjoys.Poetry was her passion.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 21, 2009
Nancy J. Bowers, a retired psychologist who had taught in college and specialized in family therapy, died Aug. 10 of cancer at her Tuscany Canterbury home. She was 68. Nancy Joan Johnson was born in Chicago and raised there and in Washington. She earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1963 from the University of Cincinnati. She held a master's degree in Montessori education, which she earned from Xavier College in 1966, and a doctorate in psychology in 1975 from Tulane University.
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NEWS
By Erin Emery and Erin Emery,Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph | June 15, 1993
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- Sometimes, love is a wild plunge.Just ask newlyweds Joe and Colleen Rhine. Last Wednesday, they accidentally drove off Pikes Peak. He's 75; she's 64.At 2 p.m. June 5, they tied the knot in Tulsa, Okla. That night, they drove to Wichita, Kan., and stayed in a honeymoon suite that took Joe more than 10 phone calls to find."The bed sheets were turned down. There were cookies on the pillows. Champagne was on ice. There was a spa in the room. They served breakfast in bed," said Mrs. Rhine.
NEWS
August 17, 2008
Forest Hill teen honored in 13-mile run in Colorado A Forest Hill teenager who was hit by a car and killed while riding his bicycle in 2003 was to be among those honored yesterday during the Keep Kids Alive Drive 25 Pikes Peak Run to Remember. Keep Kids Alive Drive 25 was founded by Tom Everson to promote safer communities by slowing down drivers. Everson, his two sons and others were scheduled to make the 13-mile vertical run up Pikes Peak in Colorado Springs, Colo., in memory of 25 children from around the country who died because someone was driving too fast or carelessly.
TRAVEL
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff | October 10, 1999
The trip was jinxed from the start.For two years, in point of fact. Ever since our small band of would-be mountain climbers planned to scale Pikes Peak on the Fourth of July 1997.What could be more patriotic? Climbing the well-worn trail up the mountain that inspired "America the Beautiful," we'd be doing that particularly American thing -- hard stuff (climbing 12 miles and 7,000 feet up) the relatively easy way.That was before Candy's dad died and Ernie's back went out and other events cropped up to delay the trip -- in July 1997 and again in July 1998.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
PIKES PEAK, Colo. -- On a clear day, the view in all directions from the top of America's most famous mountain is breathtaking.To the east, 8,000 feet below, lies the booming city of Colorado Springs, its suburbs sprawling northward toward Denver. To the southwest, more than 60 miles away, the snow-capped peaks of the Sangre de Cristo Range stab the sky.But Dimitri Klebe wants to extend the view from Pikes Peak in another direction -- up. The 39-year-old astrophysicist believes the top of the 14,110-foot mountain is an ideal location for a giant infrared telescope that could view distant galaxies with a resolution the Hubble Space Telescope could not match.
NEWS
August 17, 2008
Forest Hill teen honored in 13-mile run in Colorado A Forest Hill teenager who was hit by a car and killed while riding his bicycle in 2003 was to be among those honored yesterday during the Keep Kids Alive Drive 25 Pikes Peak Run to Remember. Keep Kids Alive Drive 25 was founded by Tom Everson to promote safer communities by slowing down drivers. Everson, his two sons and others were scheduled to make the 13-mile vertical run up Pikes Peak in Colorado Springs, Colo., in memory of 25 children from around the country who died because someone was driving too fast or carelessly.
FEATURES
November 15, 1995
Today in history: Nov. 15In 1777, the Continental Congress approved the Articles of Confederation, a precursor to the Constitution of the United States.In 1806, explorer Zebulon Pike sighted the mountaintop that later became known as Pikes Peak.In 1926, the NBC made its on-air debut with a radio network of 24 stations.In 1939, President Roosevelt laid the cornerstone of the Jefferson Memorial in Washington.In 1969, 250,000 protesters staged a peaceful demonstration in Washington against the Vietnam War.FIVE YEARS AGO: Milli Vanilli's producer confirmed rumors the duo had not done any of the singing on their debut album, "Girl You Know It's True."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 21, 2009
Nancy J. Bowers, a retired psychologist who had taught in college and specialized in family therapy, died Aug. 10 of cancer at her Tuscany Canterbury home. She was 68. Nancy Joan Johnson was born in Chicago and raised there and in Washington. She earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1963 from the University of Cincinnati. She held a master's degree in Montessori education, which she earned from Xavier College in 1966, and a doctorate in psychology in 1975 from Tulane University.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 15, 2002
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - Eight times a day, Spencer Wren's red cog trains run to the top of Pikes Peak and tourists take in the spacious skies, majestic mountains and lush tree-speckled plains that stretch to the Continental Divide. The view from Pikes Peak, which inspired Catherine Lee Bates to write "America the Beautiful," draws about 350,000 tourists a year. But yesterday, as a giant fire raged nearby, Wren ran only seven trains to the top, and not all of them were full. Ridership this week is down 15 percent from this time last year, he said.
NEWS
February 7, 2007
AACC to discuss at-home registration Anne Arundel Community College will offer STARS registration for spring cycle classes at the Pasadena and Pascal senior centers. This will give students who have previously taken a class through the college a convenient way to register for classes from their homes. Representatives from the college will explain the procedure and answer questions at 10 a.m. Monday and 12:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Pascal Center, 125 Dorsey Road in Glen Burnie, and at 10 a.m. today and 12:30 p.m. Feb. 15 at the Pasadena center, 4103 Mountain Road.
SPORTS
By Claire Koehler and Claire Koehler,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2004
Running through Patapsco Valley State Park, notorious for its hills, I saw firsthand proof of "sky runner" Beth Darnall's talent. Unlike ordinary runners, Darnall barely breathed when we ascended any and all hills. While I dreaded the climbs, Darnall loved them; it was as if she went into another gear, running up mountains as if they were molehills. "In 1996, my former coach, Bobby McGee [now the coach of Colleen DeReuck, who qualified for the U.S. Olympic team in the women's marathon]
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 12, 2004
THE TRANSMISSION went a few weeks ago, which became evident when the gears started to wind out endlessly and people in wheelchairs were beating me up hills. At the transmission-repair shop, the guy said a rebuilt transmission would cost $2,200. As that figure came out of his mouth, the room started to spin, and I lost all feeling from the waist down. Suddenly I was facing the dilemma every car owner dreads: When do you pull the plug on an old car? When do you stop pouring money down the rathole and just junk it and buy something else?
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 15, 2002
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - Eight times a day, Spencer Wren's red cog trains run to the top of Pikes Peak and tourists take in the spacious skies, majestic mountains and lush tree-speckled plains that stretch to the Continental Divide. The view from Pikes Peak, which inspired Catherine Lee Bates to write "America the Beautiful," draws about 350,000 tourists a year. But yesterday, as a giant fire raged nearby, Wren ran only seven trains to the top, and not all of them were full. Ridership this week is down 15 percent from this time last year, he said.
TRAVEL
December 10, 2000
A MEMORABLE PLACE Friendships on the trail By Peggy Stout SPECIAL TO THE SUN In the midst of my two-month journey hiking the Appalachian Trail from New York to Maine this summer, climbing the magnificent White Mountains of New Hampshire and staying in the "hut" system seemed like a vacation within a vacation. As I approached the White Mountains, my husband met me in Franconia Notch, N.H., the first leg of the Presidential Range. Recognizing the unpredictability of the weather in that region, especially above the tree line.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
PIKES PEAK, Colo. -- On a clear day, the view in all directions from the top of America's most famous mountain is breathtaking.To the east, 8,000 feet below, lies the booming city of Colorado Springs, its suburbs sprawling northward toward Denver. To the southwest, more than 60 miles away, the snow-capped peaks of the Sangre de Cristo Range stab the sky.But Dimitri Klebe wants to extend the view from Pikes Peak in another direction -- up. The 39-year-old astrophysicist believes the top of the 14,110-foot mountain is an ideal location for a giant infrared telescope that could view distant galaxies with a resolution the Hubble Space Telescope could not match.
NEWS
January 31, 2007
Arnold center lists trip lineup Arnold Senior Center will be offering the following trips this year: April 18, Dover Downs. May 2, New York City to see The Drowsy Chaperone. May 14-18, San Antonio. May 29, Totem Pole Playhouse in Fayetteville, Pa., to see Social Security. Sept. 4-11, Yellowstone National Park. Oct. 18-19, Shenandoah Valley fall foliage tour. Further information is available at the center, 44 Church Road, Arnold. Reservations are accepted 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays.
SPORTS
By Claire Koehler and Claire Koehler,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2004
Running through Patapsco Valley State Park, notorious for its hills, I saw firsthand proof of "sky runner" Beth Darnall's talent. Unlike ordinary runners, Darnall barely breathed when we ascended any and all hills. While I dreaded the climbs, Darnall loved them; it was as if she went into another gear, running up mountains as if they were molehills. "In 1996, my former coach, Bobby McGee [now the coach of Colleen DeReuck, who qualified for the U.S. Olympic team in the women's marathon]
TRAVEL
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff | October 10, 1999
The trip was jinxed from the start.For two years, in point of fact. Ever since our small band of would-be mountain climbers planned to scale Pikes Peak on the Fourth of July 1997.What could be more patriotic? Climbing the well-worn trail up the mountain that inspired "America the Beautiful," we'd be doing that particularly American thing -- hard stuff (climbing 12 miles and 7,000 feet up) the relatively easy way.That was before Candy's dad died and Ernie's back went out and other events cropped up to delay the trip -- in July 1997 and again in July 1998.
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