Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPigtown
IN THE NEWS

Pigtown

NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
Long before ecdysiast Blaze Starr became the reigning Queen of The Block, there was the legendary Bettye Mills, who arose from humble Pigtown origins to become one of the tenderloin district's more memorable characters and nightclub owners — which in those days The Baltimore Sun politely called "cabarets. " What brought Mills' name back in the news was the death earlier this month of her son-in-law, James Thomas Lee "Jimmy" Stubbs, 95, who in the late 1940s was day manager of Mills' Stork Club, whose name was later changed to the Bettye Mills' Club.
Advertisement
NEWS
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
Baltimore city fire officials are investigating the cause of a fire that started on the roof of a rowhouse in Pigtown Sunday afternoon. Fire officials responded to a call about a fire at 1169 Sargeant Street at 4:21 p.m., said Fire Captain Roman Clark. When officers arrived smoke was billowing from the roof and the occupants had evacuated. The fire had spread to the two neighboring homes as well, Clark said. The fire was extinguished quickly but extra time was needed for cleanup because more water than typical was used to extinguish the fire, Clark said.
BUSINESS
Yvonne Wenger | March 26, 2012
As I try to recall the moment when my concern really set in, I remember walking into a dark, narrow hallway inside the front door of a brick rowhouse in Pigtown. My real estate agent, Clay Tucker, scanned the walls for the light switch. When he found it, I almost wished he hadn't. We passed by the dingy white, peeling walls to the winding staircase for the second-floor, $975-a-month apartment. I scanned the no-frills place and compared the space to my house in South Carolina. Our mortgage is $1,040 a month for a three bedroom, one-and-a-half bath ranch house on a quarter acre with granite countertops, a fenced-in yard dotted with big shade trees and a car port.
NEWS
March 17, 2012
It isn't often that I find myself agreeing with columnist Dan Rodricks , but his idea of more really local TV and less redundant reporting is one I've had myself ("Let's put more 'local' in local TV," March 11). Why not add even more topics to his list? How about a 30-minute spotlight on local historical sites, of which our area has literally hundreds. Or a scenic cruise segment, for which, again, there are many candidates in our region? You could ask for viewers' home video input.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2011
Few places are left unexplored for Jennifer Petrin Johannes. Over the years, the 38-year-old public high-school art teacher has been to six continents, 27 countries and 43 states. She also shares her passion for traveling with her students, taking them on trips to Egypt, China and Australia. Johannes grew up in Demarest, N.J., but has called Pigtown her home for the last seven years. When she isn't traveling, she enjoys making jewelry and cooking. Currently, she and her students are shipping over 3000 books to a school in Kenya that she visited in 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
Chris Taylor peered down the street at the house. It was a vacant. And it was a problem. He'd been getting calls for weeks about this property, about the teenagers hanging out there, the drug dealing and prostitution. He dialed a number, placed his cell phone against his ear, and began walking around the side of the building toward the alley. As Taylor's phone connected to the person on the other end, he saw a door open. A young man walked out and pulled his hoodie over his head, casting a shadow on his face.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
Andy York recently bought a T-shirt that captures how he feels about his city. The design includes various implements of violence that include brass knuckles, a switchblade, a noose and a brick in the shape of a heart. "It all comes down to self-deprecating humor," said York, a Pigtown resident who plans to wear the tee to live music events or festivals. "I would be really upset if someone from Pittsburgh was wearing a shirt like that. " Elected officials and tourism industry leaders have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars developing slogans to emphasize Baltimore's finer points.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
At least one Marley will perform in the area this Fall. Damian Marley had been scheduled to perform at Summer Spirit Festival at Merriweather this August, but the show, which also had Nas on the bill, was unexpectedly cancelled . Then on Monday, it was announced Damian's older brother, Ziggy Maryley, would perform at the new Fillmore October 30. Tickets for the show, which start at $30, go on sale Friday. The date and line-up for the 10th Pigtown Festival was announced Sunday.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2011
For a man who was only 21 years old, Rasheed Abdullah seems to have made a lot of people angry. Police called him a drug dealer and neighbors in Pigtown wanted to throw him out, and in the last three years alone he was arrested at least 16 times. On Sunday morning, someone shot him in the head and killed him. Abdullah's was the second fatal shooting in the neighborhood in a little more than two weeks. On July 1, James Lofton, who was also 21, was gunned down on the 1100 block of S. Carey St., a few doors from Abdullah's home, and Baltimore police are looking into whether the two killings were related.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 4, 2011
Florence B. "Sissy" Cornish, a retired cafeteria cook and homemaker, died June 26, her 77th birthday, of kidney failure at Bradford Oaks Rehabilitation Center in Clinton. The former longtime Pigtown and Edmondson Village resident had lived in recent years in Upper Marlboro. Florence "Sissy" Boone was born and raised on Ostend Street in Pigtown. She attended city public schools. Until retiring in 1980, Mrs. Cornish was a cafeteria cook at the old Woolworth's on West Lexington Street in downtown Baltimore, where she had worked for many years.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.