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By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
With demand falling for the white pigment used in everything from house paint to U.S. currency, Millennium Chemicals Inc. reported yesterday that it lost $12 million in the third quarter. The loss follows the September idling of part of the company's Hawkins Point titanium dioxide plant in the southern part of Baltimore and the layoff of about 250 employees. The section that was shuttered makes pigment for the paper industry, while the part that remains in operation makes pigment for paints and plastics.
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NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | December 2, 2005
Just where does a butterfly get its vivid coloring? From microscopic crystals that capture light in its wings and reflect it back, a process that scientists are trying to understand and mimic. The push to learn how those crystals work is more than mere curiosity. The knowledge could produce brighter, man-made shades of everything from paints to cosmetics, researchers say. Scientists know that crystals on the wings of some butterflies produce what's known as constructive interference - where waves of light combine to selectively produce a color.
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NEWS
By DAIL WILLIS and DAIL WILLIS,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1997
CAMBRIDGE -- Make-it-pretty maven Martha Stewart would love this: scientific research aimed at making salmon pink.Salmon raised in captivity aren't pink. They're white."In nature, salmon eat a lot of crustaceans that have a lot of pigment," explains Reginal M. Harrell, a marine biologist at the Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies at Horn Point. "The consumer's not going to want to buy a salmon that's white."Without the crustaceans, captive salmon are getting the pigment -- called astaxanthin -- from a synthetic additive made in Germany and added to fish food.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2005
Is there such a thing as a cancer-prone personality? The answer is an emphatic no, according to Swedish and Danish researchers who conducted a study that was recently published online by the journal Cancer. The idea that some people might have an increased risk of cancer - perhaps those who are extroverted, emotionally contained or who have aggressive, Type A personalities - has been an insidious, blame-the-victim kind of notion for decades. And some studies have suggested a link between personality traits and cancer.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel, Scott Shane and Sean Somerville and Eric Siegel, Scott Shane and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1999
With the ink barely dry on last year's $246 billion tobacco settlement, some lawyers involved in that litigation are setting their sights on a new target: the manufacturers of lead pigment used in paint that has blighted the lives of poor, urban children for decades.The South Carolina law firm that played a crucial role in forging the states' tobacco settlement has urged the attorneys general to launch a similar legal campaign against the lead industry and is assisting in a private lawsuit against the pigment makers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
When the crisis of war weighed too heavily on her mind, local artist Betsey Heuisler picked up her brush and tried to lift her spirits. She hoped that painting -- something she'd done in the past for enlightenment, for comfort, for employment -- would bring her solace and peace of mind during the times that troubled her. But finding a retreat from the news of the day would prove to be more difficult than she had imagined, and from her Baltimore studio...
BUSINESS
February 5, 1992
A Columbia biotechnology company that has developed a pigment to give farm-raised salmon the beautiful blush of their wild cousins said yesterday that it has manufactured the pigment on a commercial scale.Igene Biotechnology Inc. said its product, AstaXin, was fermented in large quantities by a major U.S. manufacturer, which it declined to name.The product will be shipped to customers in South America, Japan and Pacific Rim countries to test its efficacy. Igene executives said they hope to begin producing the pigment for commercial sale.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1992
A Columbia biotechnology company that has developed a pigment to give farm-raised salmon the beautiful blush of their wild cousins said yesterday that it has manufactured the pigment on a commercial scale.Igene Biotechnology Inc. said its product, AstaXin, was fermented in large quantity by a major U.S. manufacturer that it declined to name.The product will be shipped to customers in South America, Japan and Pacific Rim countries to test its efficacy. Igene executives said they hope to begin producing the pigment for commercial sale.
FEATURES
By Roy H. Campbell and Roy H. Campbell,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 31, 1991
PHILADELPHIA Betty Ann Stewart, 43, a nurse who lives in Cherry Hill, loves wearing makeup. But she hates applying it each day. So recently, Stewart did what hundreds of women nationwide have done.She opted for permanent makeup.Now Stewart's lips glisten with color that doesn't rub off, her eyeliner will never smudge, and her eyebrows, once plucked out of existence, are thick-looking and jet-black.And it only cost her $1,600."I love it," said Stewart, soon after undergoing a controversial new procedure in which microdots of pigment (color)
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2005
Is there such a thing as a cancer-prone personality? The answer is an emphatic no, according to Swedish and Danish researchers who conducted a study that was recently published online by the journal Cancer. The idea that some people might have an increased risk of cancer - perhaps those who are extroverted, emotionally contained or who have aggressive, Type A personalities - has been an insidious, blame-the-victim kind of notion for decades. And some studies have suggested a link between personality traits and cancer.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2005
Not long after she had a black crucifix tattooed onto her lower back, Leslie Wagner began asking herself the kind of question you might expect from a curious chemistry major. What's in the ink? Surprised to find almost nothing in the scientific literature - and no comprehensive ingredient lists on the bottles - the Northern Arizona University senior enlisted a classmate and her chemistry professor and set out to solve the mystery. In a handful of laboratories around the world, researchers are starting to put tattoos under the microscope - literally, in some cases - to better understand the science behind one of the world's oldest art forms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
When the crisis of war weighed too heavily on her mind, local artist Betsey Heuisler picked up her brush and tried to lift her spirits. She hoped that painting -- something she'd done in the past for enlightenment, for comfort, for employment -- would bring her solace and peace of mind during the times that troubled her. But finding a retreat from the news of the day would prove to be more difficult than she had imagined, and from her Baltimore studio...
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2004
Dr. Laurence J. Meyer found a foolproof way of getting rid of the gray hair that hijacked his mustache when he was about 35: He shaved it off. It took another five years for the hair on his head to start losing its color. Now that he is in his 50s, the dermatology professor at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center is reconciled to the salt-and-pepper look - though he keeps a keen eye on the direction of the gray creep. "It's getting more and more, coming in at the temples," he said.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2003
Millennium Chemicals Inc., a manufacturer of a white pigment used in paints, paper and toothpaste that has been hit hard by the economic downturn, said yesterday that it will move its headquarters to Hunt Valley from New Jersey as part of a shake-up that includes the departure of its chief executive. The company also said its second-quarter loss will be larger than estimated and suspended its dividend to conserve cash "at this challenging time." The global chemical company already has a significant presence in Maryland.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 30, 2002
Quick, what's the difference between a drip and a drop? Answer: Jackson Pollock made "drip" canvases; Madeleine Keesing makes "drop" paintings. Keesing is a Washington-area artist whose approach to painting shares a spiritual kinship with that of the late New York abstract expressionist in its exploration of paint as a material and in its meditative quality. Her luminous large-scale abstractions now are on display at Goya-Girl Press Gallery through Saturday. (After the show closes, several of Keesing's paintings and prints will remain at the gallery indefinitely.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | January 16, 2002
Last call for groceries Today is the last day to send us your suggestions for the best ethnic groceries in the Baltimore area. Fax or e-mail us the store names, addresses, phone numbers and the kind of products they sell. We will be compiling a list for a story later this winter. Getting your oats January is the month Americans buy the most oatmeal, but Quaker Oats says oatmeal isn't just for a hot breakfast and oatmeal cookies. Oatmeal can be substituted for up to one-third of the flour called for in recipes for quick breads and even added to meatloaf.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2005
Not long after she had a black crucifix tattooed onto her lower back, Leslie Wagner began asking herself the kind of question you might expect from a curious chemistry major. What's in the ink? Surprised to find almost nothing in the scientific literature - and no comprehensive ingredient lists on the bottles - the Northern Arizona University senior enlisted a classmate and her chemistry professor and set out to solve the mystery. In a handful of laboratories around the world, researchers are starting to put tattoos under the microscope - literally, in some cases - to better understand the science behind one of the world's oldest art forms.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2001
More than 300 employees of Millennium Chemicals Inc. in Maryland are losing their jobs because of falling demand for the products they make, the company said yesterday. The company, based in Red Bank, N.J., will indefinitely shut down a large portion of its Hawkins Point plant as of Sept. 1. About 250 hourly workers will be fired because of the idling and 60 or 70 salaried employees are being cut from the company's offices in Hunt Valley as of today. The portion of the plant that will be idled makes titanium dioxide - a white pigment - for use in paper manufacturing.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
With demand falling for the white pigment used in everything from house paint to U.S. currency, Millennium Chemicals Inc. reported yesterday that it lost $12 million in the third quarter. The loss follows the September idling of part of the company's Hawkins Point titanium dioxide plant in the southern part of Baltimore and the layoff of about 250 employees. The section that was shuttered makes pigment for the paper industry, while the part that remains in operation makes pigment for paints and plastics.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2001
More than 300 employees of Millennium Chemicals Inc. in Maryland are losing their jobs because of falling demand for the products they make, the company said yesterday. The company, based in Red Bank, N.J., will indefinitely shut down a large portion of its Hawkins Point plant as of Sept. 1. About 250 hourly workers will be fired because of the idling and 60 or 70 salaried employees are being cut from the company's offices in Hunt Valley as of today. The portion of the plant that will be idled makes titanium dioxide - a white pigment - for use in paper manufacturing.
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