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NEWS
By Deborah I. Greene and Deborah I. Greene,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | September 18, 1990
Winning the $8.9 million Maryland Lotto jackpot could not have happened at a better time for a young Middle River couple who were so hard-pressed to pay their bills that they applied for a loan last week and cashed in pennies from their 5-month-old son's piggy bank."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Scopes by Omarr and Tribune Media Services | July 8, 2011
Cancer 06.21-07.21 You won't get accolades at work unless you do more than is expected of you. You won't receive trustworthy advice from others, so rely upon your own judgment. Leo 07.22-08.22 Small flaws could be pointed out that might undermine your confidence. Take little criticisms to heart and try to do just a little bit better to please others. Virgo 08.23-09.22 The fickle finger of fate can’t fiddle with your finances without your consent.
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NEWS
May 26, 1994
POLICE LOG* Hickory Ridge: 10400 block of Sternwheel Place: A piggy bank was stolen from a home Friday after someone kicked open a basement door. Nothing else was reported taken, police said.
NEWS
May 3, 2010
The Baltimore Sun and its editorial board are as guilty of scare-mongering as it says the opponents of the proposed Baltimore City Bottle Tax are in its editorial of April 29 ("Bottle tax scare"). Your words are as much of a disservice to the community as the anti-tax ads. I have no dog in this fight. I live in Baltimore County and work in Baltimore County. Yet, when the local paper takes the standard liberal view, it offends me to no end. When talking about the budget cuts that may be required if this tax is not passed, the editorial board resorts to the standard untouchable third rails of local politics: police, fire, roads and the children.
NEWS
By JOANNA DAEMMRICH and JOANNA DAEMMRICH,STAFF WRITER | April 25, 1991
When County Executive Robert R. Neall got there, the cupboard was far from bare. In fact, it was stocked full of cereal, rice, soup and canned vegetables. But the piggy bank was empty.Jacki Coyle didn'tbeat around the bush in telling Neall the news. When asked what the Glen Burnie food pantry needed most, Coyle answered frankly: "Money.""Our budget is whatever donations come in, so sometimes we run out," she said. "Today, we don't have any money."After touring the pantry, run by the North County Emergency Outreach Network, a non-profit coalition of 30 churches, Neall told the leaders he could take a hint.
NEWS
May 3, 2010
The Baltimore Sun and its editorial board are as guilty of scare-mongering as it says the opponents of the proposed Baltimore City Bottle Tax are in its editorial of April 29 ("Bottle tax scare"). Your words are as much of a disservice to the community as the anti-tax ads. I have no dog in this fight. I live in Baltimore County and work in Baltimore County. Yet, when the local paper takes the standard liberal view, it offends me to no end. When talking about the budget cuts that may be required if this tax is not passed, the editorial board resorts to the standard untouchable third rails of local politics: police, fire, roads and the children.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove | March 17, 1999
The makers of Monopoly waited more than 40 years to introduce a new token to the world's most popular board game.Forty years to devise something matching the insouciance of the top hat, the stylishness of the Scottish terrier or the power of the battleship. Forty years to create a new and timeless idiosyncracy along the lines of the flat iron, the race car, the wheelbarrow. Forty years to create something that would become the must-have piece for some large portion of Monopoly players.Forty years and what Hasbro found itself unveiling in New York yesterday, after a vote by Monopoly fans, was this: a sack of money.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | March 6, 2007
Whew! You filed your tax return and now you can relax until next year. Maybe. Some returns will be flagged for an IRS audit. Is yours one them? Leo Bruette, a tax partner at BDO Seidman in Bethesda, says certain items can get you noticed by the IRS, although it doesn't necessary mean you'll be audited. Nevertheless, he says, "If you open the door for them to [look] at your return, there is a reasonable chance they will look at other things on the return." Items likely to be eyeballed by the IRS: Substantial personal expenses - such as accountant fees or unreimbursed job costs - that you write off under miscellaneous expense deductions.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | June 1, 2001
Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes from police reports in Baltimore City and Baltimore County. Baltimore City Northwestern District Drug arrest: After a man was spotted by narcotics officers talking to two known drug dealers about 7 p.m. Wednesday in the 3000 block of W. Garrison Ave., he drove off in a 1992 Lexus without using his seat belt. After he was stopped a few minutes later and advised of the seat belt violation, police learned that his driver's license had been suspended six years ago. The man was arrested and a search of the car turned up a paper bag containing 402 gelatin capsules of heroin, valued at $4,020.
NEWS
January 22, 2006
When Maryland's Program Open Space was created in 1969, it was envisioned as a kind of automatic savings account for the environment. The idea is simple enough. Each time there's a real estate purchase, a state transfer tax is assessed. A portion - one-half percent of a property's value - is then used to buy land, build parks and preserve farms. The beauty of the system is that development would automatically fuel land conservation. Program Open Space wouldn't have to compete for funds.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | March 6, 2007
Whew! You filed your tax return and now you can relax until next year. Maybe. Some returns will be flagged for an IRS audit. Is yours one them? Leo Bruette, a tax partner at BDO Seidman in Bethesda, says certain items can get you noticed by the IRS, although it doesn't necessary mean you'll be audited. Nevertheless, he says, "If you open the door for them to [look] at your return, there is a reasonable chance they will look at other things on the return." Items likely to be eyeballed by the IRS: Substantial personal expenses - such as accountant fees or unreimbursed job costs - that you write off under miscellaneous expense deductions.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,Morning Call | October 15, 2006
Whether you call it a rainy-day fund, an emergency fund or a cash cushion, making plans to have significant cash available when bad things happen is fundamental to financial planning. But what exactly constitutes an emergency fund? The most conservative definition - and most repeated advice - is cash equal to three to six months of living expenses sitting in a safe account earning minuscule interest. But for many people, that could be overkill, said Sheryl Garrett, founder of the Garrett Planning Network, a group of financial advisers who provide money advice at hourly rates.
NEWS
January 22, 2006
When Maryland's Program Open Space was created in 1969, it was envisioned as a kind of automatic savings account for the environment. The idea is simple enough. Each time there's a real estate purchase, a state transfer tax is assessed. A portion - one-half percent of a property's value - is then used to buy land, build parks and preserve farms. The beauty of the system is that development would automatically fuel land conservation. Program Open Space wouldn't have to compete for funds.
BUSINESS
By David Streitfeld and David Streitfeld,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 11, 2005
As they happily watch their houses swell in value, Americans are changing their attitudes toward mortgage debt. Increasingly, a home is no longer a nest egg whose equity should never be touched, but a seemingly magical ATM enabling the owner to live it up or just live. Homeowners who refinanced took $59 billion in cash out of their houses in the second quarter, double the amount in the year-ago quarter and 16 times the average rate of the mid-1990s, according to data released last month by mortgage giant Freddie Mac. People are cashing out so quickly that the term "homeowner" soon might be inaccurate.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 13, 2005
WHY DO ALL these things have to happen around the same time? It's getting so a columnist would have to write seven days a week to keep up with all this stuff. Since that's not how we operate around here, I'll have to touch on several topics in the same column. So here goes. A bill to permit slot machines in Maryland once again failed to pass in the legislature, and I have a pretty good idea as to why. No, it's not because those Democrats opposed to slots do so on ethical grounds. They know better than that.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | April 14, 2002
WHEN the owners of the Bibelot book chain absolutely, positively had to shield $17 million from the Bank of America and the U.S. legal system, they didn't mess around with Bermuda, the Bahamas or Liechtenstein. They sent the money straight to the Cook Islands, the tightest ship in the "asset protection" business. A gorgeous, palmy archipelago in the boundless blue between Australia and Chile, the Cook Islands cooked up a new set of incorporation and trust laws in the 1980s with the help of a Denver lawyer.
BUSINESS
By Elsa C. Arnett and Elsa C. Arnett,Boston Globe | January 3, 1991
PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- Nancy Kolman of Jamestown, R.I. is living a banking nightmare.The state employee has her checking account, savings account, certificates of deposit and credit cards all in the Rhode Island State Employees Credit Union -- one of 45 banks and credit unions ordered closed Tuesday by Gov. Bruce G. Sundlun.Now she's really in the lurch. For day-to-day cash, Ms. Kolman said, she will have to roll up the pennies, nickels and dimes in her piggy bank at home and use those."The bank has everything.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scopes by Omarr and Tribune Media Services | July 8, 2011
Cancer 06.21-07.21 You won't get accolades at work unless you do more than is expected of you. You won't receive trustworthy advice from others, so rely upon your own judgment. Leo 07.22-08.22 Small flaws could be pointed out that might undermine your confidence. Take little criticisms to heart and try to do just a little bit better to please others. Virgo 08.23-09.22 The fickle finger of fate can’t fiddle with your finances without your consent.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2001
A FUND-RAISER at Jeffers Hill Elementary School perfectly illustrated the adage, "Every penny counts." During a two-week period that ended this month, schoolchildren emptied pockets and piggy banks and filled a container with more than $260 in change to donate to the American Red Cross disaster relief fund. The change collection was in response to last month's terrorist attacks, which occurred on the day the school was to hold its back-to-school night. PTA member Joanne Andrews was one of several parents who approached PTA President Kelly Carney wanting to involve pupils in helping with the relief effort.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2001
She was born on a blustery night in a Carroll County barn, a healthy foal with spidery legs and a white dollar sign emblazoned on her forehead. Outside, the wind whistled like a trifecta winner. How Mary Bo Quoit has grown. Five years later, the mare is a mainstay at Maryland racetracks, a blue-collar thoroughbred who is earning her keep. Having struggled early on, the horse, whose career has been chronicled in The Sun, has found her niche, running in cheap claiming races at Laurel and Pimlico.
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