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Pierre Auguste Renoir

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By Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2010
'Turner to Cezanne' Where: Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 17th St. NW, Washington When: Through April 25 (The museum is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.) What : Exhibition featuring a group of 19th- and 20th-century paintings and works on paper from the Davies Collection, National Museum of Wales. The 53 masterpieces — many of which have rarely been exhibited outside of Europe — include impressionist and postimpressionist artworks by Paul Cezanne, Edouard Manet, Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, J.M.W.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
From the moment it was created in 1879, a tiny landscape of the River Seine by Pierre-Auguste Renoir has been characterized by a tangled weave of embellishments, layers and knots. When the Impressionist master sat down to dash off a quick oil sketch of the River Seine, he picked up not the usual piece of canvas, but - museum experts confirmed Thursday - a linen napkin with an elaborate geometric pattern in which threads twist above, below and around one another. "Our textile curator, Anita Jones, spent a lot of time looking at the painting under a high-powered microscope," Katy Rothkopf, the museum's senior curator of European painting and sculpture, told reporters gathered for the press preview of a new exhibit, "The Renoir Returns," which opens Sunday.
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FEATURES
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
"Law & Order" is usually the TV show known for its "ripped from the headlines" plots, but Sunday's episode of "The Simpsons" seems to have been inspired by a recent legal case involving the Baltimore Museum of Art . In the episode, Lisa's guinea pig ruins the family's existing living room artwork, forcing Marge to find a replacement at a neighborhood yard sale. But brainy Lisa later discovers that the painting might be worth $100,000, causing friction with the work's original owners.
FEATURES
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
"Law & Order" is usually the TV show known for its "ripped from the headlines" plots, but Sunday's episode of "The Simpsons" seems to have been inspired by a recent legal case involving the Baltimore Museum of Art . In the episode, Lisa's guinea pig ruins the family's existing living room artwork, forcing Marge to find a replacement at a neighborhood yard sale. But brainy Lisa later discovers that the painting might be worth $100,000, causing friction with the work's original owners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
The Baltimore Museum of Art has rebutted arguments that attempt to cast doubt on its claim that a tiny landscape painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir was stolen from the museum in 1951. The document filed Tuesday - known as a "reply" - is the most recent in a chain of filings concerning whether legal title to the 1879 landscape, "Paysage Bords de Seine" belongs to the museum or to a Virginia woman, Marcia "Martha" Fuqua, who said she bought the painting for $7 at a flea market without knowing its true value.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
A federal court judge signed an order Tuesday clearing the way for a stolen landscape painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir to be speedily returned to the Baltimore Museum of Art , 62 years after the painting was stolen. U.S. District Court Leonie M. Brinkema ordered the unsigned 1879 painting on a linen napkin, "Paysage Bords de Seine" to "be released into the custody" of the museum. Arrangements for handing over the artwork still are being firmed up, according to spokeswomen for both the FBI and the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
A tiny landscape by Impressionist master Pierre-Auguste Renoir was returned to the Baltimore Museum of Art Friday afternoon - more than 62 years after the artwork mysteriously disappeared while it was on exhibition. FBI investigators drove to the museum on North Charles Street to personally hand over "Paysage Bords de Seine," museum spokeswoman Anne Mannix Brown said. The 1879 painting, which had been held for the past 16 months in a northern Virginia warehouse for safekeeping, immediately was whisked off to the conservation lab so that it can be examined for any necessary cleaning, stabilization measures, or repairs.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
It should be relatively easy for a judge to make a decision in the matter of the small landscape painted on a napkin by French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir ("U.S. court enters fray over painting," March 16). Museum collections managers and registrars adhere to the English Common Law concept, recognized in modern American jurisprudence, that deed does not follow theft, even after several changes of hands; the original owner remains the owner. Since the Baltimore Museum of Art was the original, legal owner of the painting (it having been left to the museum in an unchallenged will)
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
The lawyer representing a Virginia woman seeking to retain a tiny landscape painted by the Impressionist master Pierre-Auguste Renoir cast doubt Friday on Baltimore Museum of Art 's evidence that it owns the painting. In documents filed in the U.S. District Court of Eastern Virginia, attorney T. Wayne Biggs raised questions about everything from a 62-year-old police report and a catalog card kept by the museum, to the will filed by the heiress Saidie A. May, who left her entire art collection, including the Renoir, to the museum.
NEWS
December 26, 2013
It's been more than a year since the Baltimore Museum of Art discovered that a small painting by 19 t h -century French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir that it had it reported stolen more than 60 years ago was being auctioned in Virginia by a woman who claimed to have found it in a box of junk at a flea market. The improbable story related by Martha Fuqua, a 51-year-old driving instructor from Loudoun County, Va., never made much sense, however, and papers filed by her attorney in U.S. District Court in Alexandria last week offered nothing of substance to dispute the BMA's ownership of the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
A tiny landscape by Impressionist master Pierre-Auguste Renoir was returned to the Baltimore Museum of Art Friday afternoon - more than 62 years after the artwork mysteriously disappeared while it was on exhibition. FBI investigators drove to the museum on North Charles Street to personally hand over "Paysage Bords de Seine," museum spokeswoman Anne Mannix Brown said. The 1879 painting, which had been held for the past 16 months in a northern Virginia warehouse for safekeeping, immediately was whisked off to the conservation lab so that it can be examined for any necessary cleaning, stabilization measures, or repairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
A federal court judge signed an order Tuesday clearing the way for a stolen landscape painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir to be speedily returned to the Baltimore Museum of Art , 62 years after the painting was stolen. U.S. District Court Leonie M. Brinkema ordered the unsigned 1879 painting on a linen napkin, "Paysage Bords de Seine" to "be released into the custody" of the museum. Arrangements for handing over the artwork still are being firmed up, according to spokeswomen for both the FBI and the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
A tiny water view painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir is finally headed back to the city where a judge has ruled that it belongs — 62 years, one month and 24 days after it was reported stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art . During a hearing Friday, Judge Leonie M. Brinkema of the U.S. District Court in Eastern Virginia granted the museum's request to throw out Marcia "Martha" Fuqua's ownership claim for the 1879 artwork, "Paysage Bords de...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
The Baltimore Museum of Art has rebutted arguments that attempt to cast doubt on its claim that a tiny landscape painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir was stolen from the museum in 1951. The document filed Tuesday - known as a "reply" - is the most recent in a chain of filings concerning whether legal title to the 1879 landscape, "Paysage Bords de Seine" belongs to the museum or to a Virginia woman, Marcia "Martha" Fuqua, who said she bought the painting for $7 at a flea market without knowing its true value.
NEWS
December 26, 2013
It's been more than a year since the Baltimore Museum of Art discovered that a small painting by 19 t h -century French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir that it had it reported stolen more than 60 years ago was being auctioned in Virginia by a woman who claimed to have found it in a box of junk at a flea market. The improbable story related by Martha Fuqua, a 51-year-old driving instructor from Loudoun County, Va., never made much sense, however, and papers filed by her attorney in U.S. District Court in Alexandria last week offered nothing of substance to dispute the BMA's ownership of the work.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2013
The lawyer representing a Virginia woman seeking to retain a tiny landscape painted by the Impressionist master Pierre-Auguste Renoir cast doubt Friday on Baltimore Museum of Art 's evidence that it owns the painting. In documents filed in the U.S. District Court of Eastern Virginia, attorney T. Wayne Biggs raised questions about everything from a 62-year-old police report and a catalog card kept by the museum, to the will filed by the heiress Saidie A. May, who left her entire art collection, which the BMA says includes the Renoir, to the museum.
NEWS
April 22, 2013
The case of a small painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art decades ago took an unexpected turn recently when new questions were raised about a woman's claim that she bought it at a flea market. The holes in her story should cement the BMA's legal efforts to reclaim its property after all these years, but the strange tale also throws a fascinating light on the pitfalls that inevitably arise in any dealings with artworks of mysterious provenance.
NEWS
April 22, 2013
The case of a small painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art decades ago took an unexpected turn recently when new questions were raised about a woman's claim that she bought it at a flea market. The holes in her story should cement the BMA's legal efforts to reclaim its property after all these years, but the strange tale also throws a fascinating light on the pitfalls that inevitably arise in any dealings with artworks of mysterious provenance.
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