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By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Staff Writer | June 14, 1993
The U.S. Postal Service dedicated its 200,000-square-foot processing center near Baltimore-Washington International Airport yesterday, giving the public a behind-the-scenes look at the system handling more than 2 million pieces of mail a day.Known as the "Incoming Mail Facility," the center located off Nursery Road in the Hock Industrial Park was built because "the volume of mail in the area has exploded," said Deborah Yackley, a Postal Service spokeswoman....
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Veteran mailman Jeffrey L. Shipley turned his apartment into a repository of pilfered postage, authorities say, as he took letters, magazines, Netflix videos and even a Mother's Day card from the homes on his route. Shipley, who worked at a Postal Service facility in Catonsville, "failed to deliver, embezzled and stole over 20,000 pieces of mail," according to federal charges filed against him last week. He faces one count each of mail theft and delaying the mail. Neither Shipley nor his attorney could be reached for comment.
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SPORTS
By Gregg Doyel | June 25, 1995
MIAMI -- The Baltimore Football Club will sound less like a conglomerate and more like a sports team by its home opener on July 8.Owner Jim Speros said last night he would give the franchise a nickname but is holding off on the announcement."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2003
As technical challenges go, it's a doozy: With 202 billion pieces of mail posted each year, design a machine that will detect a single letter containing anthrax spores so tiny that thousands could be piled on the period at the end of this sentence. And make sure the contraption isn't triggered by the countless, harmless particles that spew from envelopes as they speed through mail processing machines. After more than a year of tests at Baltimore's main post office, U.S. Postal Service officials believe they have what it takes: a system that will prevent the deaths, illnesses, panic and disruption caused by the anthrax-laced letters mailed in 2001.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | December 22, 1994
The U.S. postmaster general told an audience of area business people yesterday that the city has the nation's most improved mail service over the past three months.Marvin Runyon, speaking at a Baltimore Chamber of Commerce breakfast at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, said Baltimore's mail delivery, considered dismal just a few months ago, has improved considerably.For every 100 pieces of mail delivered here, he said, 77 of them were delivered on time.Last year at this time, only 66 pieces of mail out of 100 were delivered on time.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
The U.S. postmaster general told an audience of area business people today that the city has the nation's most improved mail service during the past three months.Marvin Runyon, speaking at a Chamber of Commerce breakfast at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, said Baltimore's mail delivery, considered dismal a year ago, has improved 11 percentage points.For every 100 pieces of mail delivered here, he said, 77 of them were delivered on time. Last year at this time, only 66 pieces of mail out of 100 were delivered on time.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 8, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Postal Service reported yesterday a profit of $1 billion for the first quarter of its fiscal year, 25 percent more than forecast, as the world's largest mail operation deepened its cost-cutting. The post office cut expenses by $500 million in the quarter that ended Nov. 29 as mail volume and revenue lagged behind projections. Revenue fell $300 million short of forecasts. The Postal Service said it might surpass its $360 million profit target for the current quarter as it keeps a lid on costs.
NEWS
July 22, 1996
ON JULY 1, the U.S. Postal Service turned 25. Of course, American mail-service goes back to the nation's birth and Benjamin Franklin. But it wasn't until 1971 that the old Post TC Office, funded by tax dollars and micromanaged by an intrusive Congress, became the quasi-public Postal Service, without taxpayer support.It has been a rocky 25 years. Saddled with a huge work force and powerful unions, postal officials haven't cut overhead. Labor costs under the old Post Office ate up 80.3 cents of every dollar spent; today, that figure is 80.8 cents.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 8, 1995
A book by O. J. Simpson, discussing spousal abuse, his slain former wife and his assertion of innocence in her slaying, will be published next month by Little, Brown & Co.Titled "I Want to Tell You" and written in collaboration with Lawrence Schiller, the book was described yesterday as an effort by Mr. Simpson to respond to the more than 300,000 pieces of mail he has received since his arrest in June on charges that he murdered his former wife Nicole Brown...
NEWS
December 24, 2000
25 Years Ago: Wreaths, bells, balls and greenery deck the town and make winning doorways in the Annual Christmas Doorway Contest sponsored by the Mt. Airy Garden Club and Chamber of Commerce. Mrs. Mary Boone's door in Merridale Gardens won first place on the south side of town with its blue bells on a red background. Mrs. Walter Brown on Bennett Branch Road won second prize and Mrs. Harry Nikirk of Hickory Hills won third. There were so many good north side doors that two honorable mentions were made -- to Raymond Molesworth on Sunset Avenue and Bill Duvall on Park Avenue.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 8, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Postal Service reported yesterday a profit of $1 billion for the first quarter of its fiscal year, 25 percent more than forecast, as the world's largest mail operation deepened its cost-cutting. The post office cut expenses by $500 million in the quarter that ended Nov. 29 as mail volume and revenue lagged behind projections. Revenue fell $300 million short of forecasts. The Postal Service said it might surpass its $360 million profit target for the current quarter as it keeps a lid on costs.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
BOCA RATON, Fla.- As FBI investigators struggle to figure out who would deliver deadly anthrax spores into the headquarters of the country's largest tabloid publisher, some employees think a better question might be: Who wouldn't? "In some ways, I'm surprised somebody didn't blow up the building a long time ago," says Barry Dutter, a writer for the Weekly World News, part of America Media Inc., the company under investigation. "Certainly our papers have made a lot of enemies over the years."
NEWS
December 24, 2000
25 Years Ago: Wreaths, bells, balls and greenery deck the town and make winning doorways in the Annual Christmas Doorway Contest sponsored by the Mt. Airy Garden Club and Chamber of Commerce. Mrs. Mary Boone's door in Merridale Gardens won first place on the south side of town with its blue bells on a red background. Mrs. Walter Brown on Bennett Branch Road won second prize and Mrs. Harry Nikirk of Hickory Hills won third. There were so many good north side doors that two honorable mentions were made -- to Raymond Molesworth on Sunset Avenue and Bill Duvall on Park Avenue.
NEWS
November 16, 2000
TRAPPED BETWEEN the past and the future. That's where the U.S. Postal Service finds itself. It delivers the mail the old-fashioned way, even as futuristic message-delivery competitors steal its business. First-class postage rates are going up once again -- by a penny. Come January, it will cost 34 cents, not 33 cents, to mail a letter to Aunt Lizzy in San Diego. The rate for mailing periodicals will rise nearly 10 percent. Yet this $2.5 billion revenue increase may only hold off the next price rise for a couple of years.
NEWS
June 6, 1998
Check's in the mailGOOD NEWS from the U.S. Postal Service. The agency is testing a system of tiny radio transmitters for tracking specific pieces of mail. Late or waylaid, these letters or packages need not be lost, not with a tracking device.That's a benefit for postal customers and, perhaps, bad news for those who depend on that old alibi, "The check's in the mail."It also helps postal workers uncover bottlenecks in the system. The Associated Press reports that in a test of the device in Houston, a transmitter showed an item had been sitting still for 20 hours, although mail was regularly being moved out of that office.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
If you're wondering why that Christmas card you mailed across town seemed as if it traveled on a dogsled via the North Pole, Baltimore post office employees say you might blame the color of the envelope you selected or the way you write your sevens and not their work performance.As Baltimoreans start mailing the annual avalanche of holiday greetings and packages -- this season's national tally is expected to reach nearly 19 billion pieces -- pause to consider the potential logjams that might ensnare postal materials this month.
NEWS
April 22, 1993
Severna Park residents continue to experience difficulties with mail service through the new Earleigh Heights post office facility.The $3.2 million center, where mail eventually will be completely machine-sorted, serves Severna Park, Pasadena, Arnold, Millersville, Glen Burnie, Hanover and Linthicum Heights.Residents have complained about receiving torn mail, including envelopes that contained checks.Postal workers say the problems are due to malfunctioning equipment in the new Severna Park Delivery Distribution Center.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2003
As technical challenges go, it's a doozy: With 202 billion pieces of mail posted each year, design a machine that will detect a single letter containing anthrax spores so tiny that thousands could be piled on the period at the end of this sentence. And make sure the contraption isn't triggered by the countless, harmless particles that spew from envelopes as they speed through mail processing machines. After more than a year of tests at Baltimore's main post office, U.S. Postal Service officials believe they have what it takes: a system that will prevent the deaths, illnesses, panic and disruption caused by the anthrax-laced letters mailed in 2001.
NEWS
July 22, 1996
ON JULY 1, the U.S. Postal Service turned 25. Of course, American mail-service goes back to the nation's birth and Benjamin Franklin. But it wasn't until 1971 that the old Post TC Office, funded by tax dollars and micromanaged by an intrusive Congress, became the quasi-public Postal Service, without taxpayer support.It has been a rocky 25 years. Saddled with a huge work force and powerful unions, postal officials haven't cut overhead. Labor costs under the old Post Office ate up 80.3 cents of every dollar spent; today, that figure is 80.8 cents.
BUSINESS
By KANSAS CITY STAR | June 23, 1996
Once again, says Marcus Smith, publisher of Postal World, the U.S. Postal Service is holding out a helping hand to big business while slapping small business with the other.It all has to do with new postal regulations that take effect July 1 to make bulk mailings more efficient. Although it takes an almost-200-page tome to detail the changes, the bottom line is that mailers that can jump through the new hoops will likely get better rates. And smaller companies that can't clear those hurdles will probably pay more.
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