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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 3, 1991
Q: We recently inherited a beautiful chest of drawers that will look great against a wall in our living room. But we're having trouble deciding what else to put on that wall. Can you suggest something that would enhance the beauty of the chest? It's made of oak with a dark finish.A: You're right to be considering possible accompaniments for your chest of drawers. No matter how beautiful or important a piece of furniture may be, it shouldn't be made to stand alone in a room. At the same time, it's essential not to mar the piece's appearance by surrounding it with inappropriate objects or furnishings.
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By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | July 14, 2008
Dr. James Johnson Gerlach, an ear doctor and collector of early American furniture, died Thursday, after a short illness, at the Stella Maris nursing home in Timonium. The former Baldwin resident was 86. Born and raised in Baltimore, he graduated in 1939 from the Gilman School and in 1943 from Colorado College, where he developed a passion for falconry, a form of hunting that involves training birds of prey. His son Robert E. Gerlach of Greensburg, Pa., who took notes on conversations he had with his father, quoted Dr. Gerlach as saying, "I'm not quite sure why my father decided to send me to Colorado; maybe it was to keep me from becoming more involved with a girl I had met while in high school."
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FEATURES
By RITA ST. CLAIR | January 5, 1992
Q: I can't decide what to do about a living room wall near the arched opening to my dining room. The wall is 6 feet long, leaving plenty of space for a piece of furniture to be placed against it. A chair makes no sense, however, because there are no other seating pieces nearby. What do you suggest I put there?A: You've already made a good start by realizing what you shouldn't do.All of us have probably seen a lone chair stationed against a wall, as if to place some unwanted guest in solitary.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | June 15, 2008
Because of budget issues, I have to use in my new home some clunky furniture upholstered in brown-and-dark-green material. These pieces are overscaled in the new home's small living room, and the fabric is worn and needs replacing. What should I do? Maybe give the white walls and wooden floor a different treatment? Reupholster? There's no single way of visually reducing the size of a piece of furniture that's too big for its surroundings. One technique might be used for a piece that's out of scale with others in a room, while a different approach might be taken in the case of a sofa, say, that's of a style not consistent with the overall look of an interior.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 30, 1997
A friend of mine buys a dozen white cotton T-shirts every May and then throws them all away every October. I guess his routine makes some sense. White cotton T-shirts don't cost very much, and they look good only when they're in pristine condition.At the same time, I have trouble relating to such indiscriminate disposal. There's something about the use-it-and-then-lose-it mentality that seems slightly sinful.Clearly, though, frugality is becoming less common -- even in my own field. The throw-away impulse now applies to household furnishings such as chairs, tables and rugs that used to be kept until they literally started falling apart.
FEATURES
By UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | May 10, 1998
In the past 20 years, the status of the armoire has evolved from exotic to essential, from overscaled white elephant to a staple among household furnishings.This is simply because it's a piece of furniture that actually works. In fact, the armoire has been functioning diligently in Europe since the Middle Ages. Back then it was a kind of locker in which the well-dressed crusader could hang his suit of armor and store his mace, spear, sword and other weapons of righteous warfare.Later, presumably when hand-to-hand combat faded from favor, the armoire assumed more domestic duties, serving as a cabinet for clothes in pre-closet centuries.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | May 4, 2008
I want to create a brighter and softer look in a foyer with a stained-wood floor and staircase. It's been suggested that I carpet the stairs, but I wonder whether you can offer a less expensive alternative. I'm willing to paint and to buy a small piece of furniture. Because such a space is typically small and filled with architectural elements, there are plenty of challenges to be met.Carpeting the staircase would introduce the color and pattern that your foyer lacks. But paint and a single piece of furniture can help, too. Heather Paper's book Decorating Ideas That Work, published by Taunton Press, shows one foyer idea.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 14, 2006
Last weekend I went out in the backyard and stripped. I was peeling layers from a piece of furniture, a wardrobe, not myself. I was following the lead of my wife, who some weeks ago started peeling wallpaper, yes wallpaper, and paint off this piece of furniture. I'm no expert on furniture. I am not sure when you call a tall closet cabinet a plain ole "wardrobe," which stores garments, and when you call it an "armoire," once a repository for armor. I suspect an armoire is older, more expensive and better looking.
NEWS
By JOHN WOESTENDIEK and JOHN WOESTENDIEK,SUN REPORTER | December 18, 2005
You know a lion when you see one. A witch, while she may take a little longer to spot, is something most of us can recognize as well. But a wardrobe? If you haven't read the book or seen the movie, if you're not into antiques and have never needed to supplement your closet space, you might not be familiar with the piece of furniture that stars in the new movie The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, based on the first in the series of C.S. Lewis children's books.
NEWS
By Beth Smith | May 15, 1997
My wing chair is in terrible shape. The cushion is lopsided, the arms are frayed, the fabric is faded, and the cat has used the back for his own personal scratching post. I am tempted to cart it to the nearest dump.But wait. This chair has a history. I love this chair. It was the first piece of furniture my husband and I bought more than 30 years ago. It sat next to the old fireplace in our little Lutherville apartment and sometimes my husband would build a fire and we would squeeze into the chair together and dream about the future.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | May 4, 2008
I want to create a brighter and softer look in a foyer with a stained-wood floor and staircase. It's been suggested that I carpet the stairs, but I wonder whether you can offer a less expensive alternative. I'm willing to paint and to buy a small piece of furniture. Because such a space is typically small and filled with architectural elements, there are plenty of challenges to be met.Carpeting the staircase would introduce the color and pattern that your foyer lacks. But paint and a single piece of furniture can help, too. Heather Paper's book Decorating Ideas That Work, published by Taunton Press, shows one foyer idea.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | October 7, 2007
In state-of-the-art homes teeming with technological toys, the notion of a daybed is almost anachronistic. Even the word seems oddly old-fashioned. But despite its quaint label, the daybed has been inching its way back into the design lexicon and retail stores for the last few years. Often deeper than a sofa, or slim as a twin bed with or without sides, it's more a generous settee than a one-sided chaise. Designed for more than sitting, it beckons. Whether you sit, sprawl or flat out nap on it, the daybed is the ultimate piece of cocooning furniture.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 14, 2006
Last weekend I went out in the backyard and stripped. I was peeling layers from a piece of furniture, a wardrobe, not myself. I was following the lead of my wife, who some weeks ago started peeling wallpaper, yes wallpaper, and paint off this piece of furniture. I'm no expert on furniture. I am not sure when you call a tall closet cabinet a plain ole "wardrobe," which stores garments, and when you call it an "armoire," once a repository for armor. I suspect an armoire is older, more expensive and better looking.
NEWS
By JOHN WOESTENDIEK and JOHN WOESTENDIEK,SUN REPORTER | December 18, 2005
You know a lion when you see one. A witch, while she may take a little longer to spot, is something most of us can recognize as well. But a wardrobe? If you haven't read the book or seen the movie, if you're not into antiques and have never needed to supplement your closet space, you might not be familiar with the piece of furniture that stars in the new movie The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, based on the first in the series of C.S. Lewis children's books.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | October 5, 2003
As a piece of furniture, the dressing table can range from unassuming to flamboyant. It can be a simple desk, stand, pedestal table or a desk-like form with an attached mirror and drawers to hold makeup. How time is spent there, however brief, is what makes it special. Dressing tables -- or vanities, as they're also aptly named -- are very personal, although some might consider them frivolous and anachronistic. But some women can't imagine living without one. "It's one of those guilty pleasures," says Jill Waage, editor of Decorating, a Better Homes and Gardens special-interest publication.
NEWS
By Nadia Lerner and Nadia Lerner,Special to the Sun | April 27, 2003
Would you restore an antique American tavern table whose maple finish is scarred by centuries-old wear and tear? Say "yes," and you might be sorry. "The finish on a piece of furniture is viewed by many people similarly to the way an archaeologist or historian views an archaeological site," says Leslie Keno, senior specialist in American furniture at Sotheby's auction house in New York. According to Keno, a frequent appraiser of American furniture on PBS' Antiques Roadshow, an antique that has sustained damage over the centuries may be more valuable because of its flaws.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | January 4, 1998
Most people redecorate their homes and expect the result to last for years and years. But sometimes adding just one piece of furniture or an accessory can make a whole room look fresh and very up to date. It's a delicate balance: You want furnishings that are very much of the moment but won't look out of style in a year or so.If the new year has you thinking of redecorating but you don't know where to start, we have some suggestions. Here are our picks for pieces that pack plenty of punch but also have proven staying power.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | September 15, 1996
Despite today's mobile lifestyles, many of us want to believe that the furniture we're buying will one day be our children's heirlooms. I think this notion is often a delusion. For lots of reasons -- some having to do with differences in taste and others with the quality of mass production -- most pieces prove to have a relatively short life span.But there's one type of furniture that does seem to get passed down the generations, probably because it conjures up nostalgic images of quiet nights beside the fireplace or lullabies sung by a mother to her restless child.
TRAVEL
March 18, 2001
Skiing in comfort Take a look around your living room and zero in on that piece of furniture left over from college or inherited from your colorblind aunt. Would you like to launch it down the side of a mountain? If so, head for Montana. Every year, Big Mountain Ski and Summer Resort in Whitefish, Mont., holds its Annual Furniture Race on the Saturday of its closing ski weekend. This year's events are set for April 7, when participants hurl themselves and their furniture down the slopes on skis.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1999
Every piece of furniture that antique dealer Aileen Minor displays shows amazing craftsmanship -- deep, ornate hand carving and polished veneers.All of it is as perfect as anything on a showroom floor, and each piece has lasted a lifetime."
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