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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Linda Settles from Havre de Grace was looking for a recipe for brown sugar pie that duplicated the one her grandmother used to make. She said her grandmother had five daughters but none of them remember how she made the pie. Jeannie Armstrong from Dayton, MD found a recipe for the pie in a cookbook she bought at an antique store years ago. It was first published in 1915 and revised in 1944. I tested the recipe that she kindly sent in and found that it needed a little tweaking.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Linda Settles from Havre de Grace was looking for a recipe for brown sugar pie that duplicated the one her grandmother used to make. She said her grandmother had five daughters but none of them remember how she made the pie. Jeannie Armstrong from Dayton, MD found a recipe for the pie in a cookbook she bought at an antique store years ago. It was first published in 1915 and revised in 1944. I tested the recipe that she kindly sent in and found that it needed a little tweaking.
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NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2002
Laura Cunninghame of White Hall requested a recipe for bean pie that she had heard was popular in the Baltimore City area. "My neighbor told me about the pie, which she does not have a recipe for. Would appreciate your help." Jean Pierce of Fayetteville, N.C., responded. "I look forward to reading your recipes in our newspaper. I saw this week where someone is hunting for a bean-pie recipe. My family likes this one." Pinto-Bean Pie Serves 8 to 12 4 eggs 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup mashed pinto beans, leaving a few beans whole 1/2 cup margarine 1 pie shell pecan halves, for garnish Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special To The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Janet Powell from Oak Ridge, Tenn., was looking for the recipe for a cheese pie that both of her grandmothers made. She said that it was a dessert pie made with cottage cheese. Vivian Glover from Joppatowne sent in a cheese pie recipe that her best friend's mother used to make back in the 1940s that was always a favorite of hers. Glover said she still bakes it when she needs some comfort food. I received several different versions of this pie. Some of the recipes were slightly more elaborate then this one, with additions like cinnamon or nutmeg, raisins or nuts.
FEATURES
November 25, 1992
Pumpkin may have been the Pilgrims' pride, but in many homes today, it just isn't Thanksgiving without pecan pie.The basic recipe -- eggs, corn syrup, sugar, vanilla and lots of pecans -- is ripe for experiment.Chocolate and bourbon come to mind as successful additions. Simply sprinkle in a few chocolate chunks along with the pecans; or, soak the nuts in bourbon for a day or so before making the pie.Golden ambrosia pecan pie combines elements of a Southern staple, ambrosia salad, with pecan pie.Classic pecan pie3 eggs3 heaping tablespoons sugar1 tablespoon flour1 cup white corn syrup1 cup pecans1 teaspoon vanillaunbaked pastry for a 9-inch pieHeat oven to 350 degrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2010
Francis Bacon from St. Augustine, Fla., was looking for the recipe for the fresh strawberry pie that is served at a restaurant chain in her area called the Eat & Park. She said she has tried several recipes but has not been able to duplicate theirs. Diana Bauer , also coincidentally from St. Augustine, Fla., sent in a recipe for a fresh strawberry pie which she says is from Shoney's, another restaurant chain in that area. She says that she has made it for years and that it always gets rave reviews.
FEATURES
By GAIL FORMAN | November 27, 1994
What's fall without pecan pie? Fresh and abundant at this season, the native American pecan nut has long been associated with cool weather and end-of-year holiday treats. For those of you who didn't get enough of Aunt Jen's pecan pie at Thanksgiving and can't wait for Uncle Harry's Christmas version, try baking one for yourself.Basic pecan pies are a cinch to prepare. The ingredients need only be stirred together by hand and poured into a pastry shell. The usual baking temperature is 350 degrees but pecan pie is so adaptable that it can be baked at higher or lower temperatures with similar results, a convenience when the pie is baked along with other foods in the same oven.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | July 2, 2000
If apple is the quintessential American pie, then peach is surely our summertime favorite, and all the more if it's served a la mode. To make a peach pie worthy of the name, use fully ripe fruit -- white, yellow or red peaches; cling or freestone type -- and a pastry crust that's rich and tender but still sturdy enough to contain its sweet, juicy burden without collapsing. Peach Pie With Almond-Pecan Streusel Makes 8 servings pastry for 1 (9-inch) single- crust pie 5 cups peeled, sliced peaches (5 to 6 large peaches)
FEATURES
By ELLEN HAWKS and ELLEN HAWKS,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2000
Anna Mary Upholster of Latrobe, Pa., requested a recipe for oatmeal pie. She wrote that none of her cookbooks has such a recipe. Tester Laura Reiley chose the recipe sent in by Mary Ann Peeples of Stedman, N.C. Peeples wrote that she found the recipe in a newspaper, the Kansas City Star. "It is easy to make and resembles a pecan pie." Pearl F. Lewison of Beresford, S.D., requested a prune pie recipe. Her answer came from Carol Reeves of Westport, Ore. Oatmeal Pie Serves 8-12 3 eggs, well-beaten 2/3 cup granulated sugar 1 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons butter, softened 2/3 cup sweetened shredded coconut 2/3 cup quick-cooking oats 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 9-inch unbaked pie shell Combine all filling ingredients and pour mixture into the prepared pie shell.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | May 23, 2007
Quinlan Cummings of Greenville, N.C., was looking for a recipe for a Lemon Chess Pie. Ruth Ann Barker of Fayetteville, N.C., sent in a recipe for the pie from the Farm Journal Complete Pie Cookbook published in 1965. She says this is a recipe she has enjoyed over the years. The recipe notes say that the filling can be baked in a traditional unbaked pie shell or that a graham-cracker or vanilla-wafer crumb crust can be substituted. I tested it in the traditional pastry crust. The finished pie was a beautiful lemon-yellow color inside and nut brown on top; it had a fine balance of tart and sweet.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | November 14, 2007
Brenda Walker of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe for pumpkin pie with orange zest as one of the ingredients. She lost the original recipe from many years ago and has had no luck duplicating it. Gladys Wilt of Lothian sent in a recipe from the Libby's Home-Baked Goodness cookbook for a Sour-Cream-Orange-Pumpkin Pie. While this is probably not the exact recipe that Walker was searching for, it does have orange zest and is definitely worth her...
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | May 23, 2007
Quinlan Cummings of Greenville, N.C., was looking for a recipe for a Lemon Chess Pie. Ruth Ann Barker of Fayetteville, N.C., sent in a recipe for the pie from the Farm Journal Complete Pie Cookbook published in 1965. She says this is a recipe she has enjoyed over the years. The recipe notes say that the filling can be baked in a traditional unbaked pie shell or that a graham-cracker or vanilla-wafer crumb crust can be substituted. I tested it in the traditional pastry crust. The finished pie was a beautiful lemon-yellow color inside and nut brown on top; it had a fine balance of tart and sweet.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | September 20, 2006
Leslie Jarzombek and her mother from Santa Rosa, Calif., were looking for a recipe for a sour-cream-raisin pie like the one they had at a small restaurant in southwest Idaho. The sour-cream part was rich and creamy with dark raisins throughout the filling. They thought that the pie was not baked. Ann Alien of Columbus, Miss., sent in a recipe for a no-bake raisin-sour cream pie. In Alien's recipe the filling is prepared in a double boiler and poured into a prebaked pie shell, then chilled and topped with sour cream, graham-cracker crumbs and lemon rind.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2006
Gwendolyn Blackwell of Baltimore had been unable to find the recipe for the strawberry pie that was served at the locally renowned, but now closed, Haussner's restaurant in Baltimore. Fortunately, Shelley Donald of Reistertown had a recipe that was labeled as the restaurant's pie in her collection. As a timesaving measure, I decided to test this recipe using a store-bought frozen pie shell. While it may not have been quite as tasty as a crust made from scratch, it made this pie a snap to assemble on a summer afternoon.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 11, 2005
Gertrude McSpiritt from East Windsor, N.J., was looking for a simple quiche recipe that would be suitable to teach her 10-year-old grandchild. She is 86 years old and still loves to cook but she "can't cope with a long recipe." Terrill Ross from Salem, Ore., sent in a recipe for Goodnight Quiche that "is very easy and very good." Because the recipe calls for a frozen pie shell, it takes no time to make and is virtually fail-safe. It has only a few basic ingredients and the only extra step is browning the ground beef.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2004
Betty Sheppard of Baltimore wrote to request a raisin pie recipe. "I had a recipe but when my husband passed away and I had to move, I lost it. Could someone help me?" Garilee Cave of Morro Bay, Calif., responded. "This is the best raisin pie recipe I have ever tasted. Since I don't care for cooked raisins, that is really saying something! My mother-in-law, Opal White, taught me how to make it 43 years ago. I sure hope you enjoy it as much as we have over the years." Recipe requests Andrea Eakin of Delmont, Pa., is hoping someone will have a recipe for pepper rolls.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
It's not too far from northwest Baltimore to Washington, but it's a long way from sponge cake with blue icing to Viennese Chocolate Fantasy Cake and Triple Chocolate Terrine. Ann Amernick knows, because that's the path she's traveled since growing up in Baltimore largely unaware of the culinary world (though "I loved Haussner's for the strawberry pie," she recalls) to being one of the more noted pastry chefs in the country.She has baked her famous cakes and tortes at the Big Cheese in Georgetown, Le Pavilion and Jean-Louis at the Watergate in D.C. and she was assistant pastry chef at the White House in 1980 and 1981.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
It's not too far from northwest Baltimore to Washington, but it's a long way from sponge cake with blue icing to Viennese Chocolate Fantasy Cake and Triple Chocolate Terrine. Ann Amernick knows, because that's the path she's traveled since growing up in Baltimore largely unaware of the culinary world (though "I loved Haussner's for the strawberry pie," she recalls) to being one of the more noted pastry chefs in the country.She has baked her famous cakes and tortes at the Big Cheese in Georgetown, Le Pavilion and Jean-Louis at the Watergate in D.C. and she was assistant pastry chef at the White House in 1980 and 1981.
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