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By Dotty Griffith and Dotty Griffith,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | May 28, 1997
On the occasion of my pastry epiphany, I felt amazement, gratitude and liberation -- an awakening to a new world order, a world in which I'm free from pie crust anxiety.It is a freedom born of desperation. I was desperate for a pie crust and didn't want to drive to the supermarket for a package of Pillsbury's best.Perhaps it was just my time. After years of frustration, I unexpectedly found myself blessed with "the touch."I can now make a pie crust that is flaky and tender with a pretty fluted edge.
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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Kira Eying from Baltimore was seeking a recipe for oyster pie. She said her husband's grandmother used to make it but no one in the family can find her recipe. She said was it was similar to an oyster stew, with potatoes, carrots and other vegetables but baked in a deep-dish pie plate with a flaky crust. Mike Herbert from Sykesville shared a recipe for oyster pie that he said came from his mother, Dorothy Herbert. He said he makes it at least once a year and "because the taste of the oysters is so delicate, very little seasoning is needed and as the dish cooks the oyster flavor permeates the vegetables.
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By Waltrina Stovall and Waltrina Stovall,Contributing Writer Universal Press Syndicate | November 21, 1993
TC What's more autumn than apple pie?Apple-cranberry pie, of course.Though apples are in stores the year-round, fall is the harvest season for most varieties.Cranberries are truly seasonal. The fresh berry is available October through about the end of December; for the rest of the year, we have to substitute frozen.So if the arrival of cooler days gives you the urge to bake, consider the apple-cranberry pie.Apple-cranberry pieMakes 1 piepie crust for 10-inch, double-crust pie4 cups peeled and sliced apples (McIntosh or Cortland)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
Pining for homemade pie, but don't want to crank up the oven while summer's still upon us? Then skip those preheating rituals in favor of no-bake pies. Also known as icebox pies, these delightfully retro desserts require minimal fuss and kitchen time, making them ideal summertime desserts. A no-bake pie generally begins with a cookie-crumb crust, which cradles some type of filling. Think pudding, custard and mousse. Creamy cheesecake, perhaps. Or airy whipped cream and fresh fruit combos.
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By Dolly Merritt | November 3, 1990
Around the houseSeason new cast-iron skillet. Coat inside with vegetable oil and heat on top of stove for 10 minutes; allow to cool. Wipe off excess oil and store. Be sure to wash after each use with sudsy water. Do not scour. Rinse with hot water and dry. Lightly oil to prevent rusting.* Perk up windows quickly. Drape scarves or squares of fabric over curtain rods to create an instant valance. Make throw pillows to match.* Wipe stainless-steel sink with a damp cloth and dry with a soft cloth after each use. Evaporated water can leave mineral deposits that dull the finish.
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By The Hartford Courant | February 23, 1994
While developing and testing recipes for her book on low-fat baking, Susan Purdy found ways to cut the fat content without sacrificing flavors. Here are some of the tricks she used in "Have Your Cake and Eat It, Too."* Maximize small amounts of nuts, which are high in fat, by sprinkling them on top of a cake or pie instead of mixing them into the batter or filling. "They have what I call 'taste visibility' that way," Ms. Purdy says. Toasting the nuts intensifies the flavor. Nut oils also are a way to add a nutty flavor to a recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Kira Eying from Baltimore was seeking a recipe for oyster pie. She said her husband's grandmother used to make it but no one in the family can find her recipe. She said was it was similar to an oyster stew, with potatoes, carrots and other vegetables but baked in a deep-dish pie plate with a flaky crust. Mike Herbert from Sykesville shared a recipe for oyster pie that he said came from his mother, Dorothy Herbert. He said he makes it at least once a year and "because the taste of the oysters is so delicate, very little seasoning is needed and as the dish cooks the oyster flavor permeates the vegetables.
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By Dolly Merritt | November 28, 1992
Around the housePrepare old cake pans for holiday baking. Fill with warm water and 1 teaspoon vinegar and let stand overnight. Corrosion will wash off. New baking pans should be greased and heated in oven for about 15 minutes before using to prevent rust.* Soak heavily soiled oven racks in tub with very hot water. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of automatic dishwashing detergent into tub. Let sit until grease spots dissolve.* Avoid tears from chopping onions. Place unpeeled onions in refrigerator for at least half an hour.
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By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | May 17, 1995
French Silk Chocolate Pie is one of the world's ultimate chocolate indulgences. However, the dreamy dessert has a bad side: It's loaded with fat and calories.Our recipe here has about half the calories and fat of the original.Lighter Chocolate Silk PieMakes 8 servingsCRUST:11 whole graham crackers2 tablespoons granulated sugar1 egg whiteFILLING:1 (8-ounce) block fat-free cream cheese1 cup powdered sugar1 whole egg2 egg whites1 (2-ounce) square unsweetened chocolate, melted and cooled1 teaspoon vanilla1/3 cup heavy whipping cream1 tablespoon finely chopped walnuts or almondsHeat the oven to 350. In a food processor or blender, grind graham crackers into fine crumbs.
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2000
Lucy Stahley of Baltimore wanted a recipe for Zucchini Pie, noting that she had heard it was great, tasted like apples, and she always had a surplus of zucchini. Her response came from Beatrice Parks of Harvard, Ill., who wrote, "We love it. Use large zucchini but still tender enough that you can pierce the skin easily with your thumbnail. Peel, cut in quarters lengthwise, remove the seeds and slice crosswise." Zucchini Pie Serves 8 4 cups (about 3 medium) zucchini sliced and steamed until tender-crisp 2 tablespoons lemon juice dash of salt 1 cup to 1 1/2 cups sugar, depending on sweetness preference 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon 1 1/2 teaspoons cream of tartar dash of nutmeg 3 tablespoons flour 1 (9-inch)
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | May 23, 2007
If nobody's perfect, as the old saying goes, how is it that there's so much perfect food? Plug "perfect burger" into a Google search and you'll find numerous sets of directions to achieve the ideal, courtesy of sources as varied as the National Cattlemen's Beef Association, ehow.com and Gourmet editor Ruth Reichl's husband. Foodnetwork.com has pages of recipes with "perfect" in the title. (That's not counting all the dishes labeled "world's best" or "best ever," let alone all the "ultimate" offerings from Food Network chef Tyler Florence.
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By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | April 15, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick. SUNDAY / Family Make your own roast lamb for Easter and brush on this spicy-sweet glaze.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | October 8, 2000
I AM THE family's apple pie enabler. I encourage, assist and cheer on the apple pie maker. Put another way, I peel and slice the apples and my wife makes the pies. While I have made a pie crust in my time, I am, on the whole, dough-challenged. My wife is not. She makes a great pie crust but is time-challenged. She rarely has enough time to make a dessert, especially an apple pie, which involves a lot of cutting and peeling. To encourage her in her pie-making art and to get some sweet stuff on my dessert plate, I recently reached a pie-making pact with her. I do the fruit; she does the dough.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2000
Lucy Stahley of Baltimore wanted a recipe for Zucchini Pie, noting that she had heard it was great, tasted like apples, and she always had a surplus of zucchini. Her response came from Beatrice Parks of Harvard, Ill., who wrote, "We love it. Use large zucchini but still tender enough that you can pierce the skin easily with your thumbnail. Peel, cut in quarters lengthwise, remove the seeds and slice crosswise." Zucchini Pie Serves 8 4 cups (about 3 medium) zucchini sliced and steamed until tender-crisp 2 tablespoons lemon juice dash of salt 1 cup to 1 1/2 cups sugar, depending on sweetness preference 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon 1 1/2 teaspoons cream of tartar dash of nutmeg 3 tablespoons flour 1 (9-inch)
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | June 30, 1999
Bobbi Jo Beaver of Rapid City, S.D., was looking for a pecan-pie recipe made with unsalted butter that she called "luscious." She thought the name of it was "76th Street Cafe Pecan Pie." She was close. Stacey Politzer of Baltimore and Frances Morgan of Arbutus responded to her request with a recipe for "72 Market Street Pecan Pie," named after a restaurant in Venice, Calif. 72 Market Street Pecan Pie Serves 10 to 12 CRUST: 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon granulated sugar 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 cups (3 sticks)
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By Dotty Griffith and Dotty Griffith,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | May 28, 1997
On the occasion of my pastry epiphany, I felt amazement, gratitude and liberation -- an awakening to a new world order, a world in which I'm free from pie crust anxiety.It is a freedom born of desperation. I was desperate for a pie crust and didn't want to drive to the supermarket for a package of Pillsbury's best.Perhaps it was just my time. After years of frustration, I unexpectedly found myself blessed with "the touch."I can now make a pie crust that is flaky and tender with a pretty fluted edge.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
Go ahead, ask Dad what he wants as a special treat for Father's Day. But I bet I know what he'll say.Pie.Cherry pie. Or apple pie. Or lemon meringue pie. Or chocolate pie. Or peanut butter pie. His favorite, whatever it is.And probably a la mode.You have two choices here. You can wimp out and head for the nearest bakery to put in your order.Or you get out the flour and crank up the oven and dig in.Actually, there is a third choice. You can start at the grocery, in the dairy case or frozen food case, with a prepared pie crust.
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