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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 20, 1994
Of the four artists in a stimulating exhibit currently at Loyola, Symmes Gardner is represented by the fewest works but makes the biggest impression. His paintings, with their active, expressionist brush stroke, tactile surfaces, strong light and imposing forms, grab hold of the viewer and won't let go.In the largest of them, "Sleep," a lone figure lies sleeping in a field under a gray sky. The figure is big and bear-like, but in its unclothed state it...
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 20, 1997
Landscape is the subject matter in name only of Laura Wesley Ford's paintings and drawings at Galerie Francoise. Her pictures incorporate the barns and fields, sky and water of the farm community in New York's Catskills where she recently worked, but they aren't about those things.Ford's not really a depicter at all. At heart she's an abstract artist concerned with composition; color and form; picture plane vs. illusion of depth; and other such formal issues."Barn Near Fishs Eddy" shows a barn and silo with a band of grass in the foreground, "near" us, and a mountain in the "distance."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Gwen Gant | May 17, 1991
TOWSON STATE UNIVERSITYHoltzman Gallery, Fine Arts Center, Osler and Cross Campus drives. Sculptures by Gagik Aroutiunian.This master of fine arts thesis exhibit (through May 26) features works by Soviet-Armenian artist Gagik Aroutiunian, who describes his sculptures as paintings without a picture plane or, in some cases, with the picture plane exploded. He tries to define the gap between painting and sculpture, according to a gallery statement, which adds that "in his treatment of surface he creates texture and colors that intensify the presence of the work spatially."
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 14, 1996
At Washington's Corcoran Gallery right now, you can see a "painting" made of chewed sculpture compound, another whose central section is a rectangle of marijuana leaves, another composed of strips of film, another that incorporates a sofa, and another that includes a section of striped, knitted fabric.They are all in "Painting Outside Painting," the Corcoran's 44th biennial exhibit of contemporary American painting. And if you're wondering whether they're serious art or gimmicks, the answer is that some are one and some are the other.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | September 21, 1992
It's not surprising that Robert Llewellyn and Don Cook, who have exhibited together before, again share a show at the Nye Gomez Gallery. These artists are interested in schematic representations of, respectively, boats and buildings. Though distinctive in their styles, both tend to treat their rendered objects as pure geometric forms.Mr. Llewellyn, in an artist's statement, mentions the influence of the Chesapeake Bay on his work. His watercolors are anything but pretty representational pictures, however.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 20, 1997
Landscape is the subject matter in name only of Laura Wesley Ford's paintings and drawings at Galerie Francoise. Her pictures incorporate the barns and fields, sky and water of the farm community in New York's Catskills where she recently worked, but they aren't about those things.Ford's not really a depicter at all. At heart she's an abstract artist concerned with composition; color and form; picture plane vs. illusion of depth; and other such formal issues."Barn Near Fishs Eddy" shows a barn and silo with a band of grass in the foreground, "near" us, and a mountain in the "distance."
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 14, 1996
At Washington's Corcoran Gallery right now, you can see a "painting" made of chewed sculpture compound, another whose central section is a rectangle of marijuana leaves, another composed of strips of film, another that incorporates a sofa, and another that includes a section of striped, knitted fabric.They are all in "Painting Outside Painting," the Corcoran's 44th biennial exhibit of contemporary American painting. And if you're wondering whether they're serious art or gimmicks, the answer is that some are one and some are the other.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine L. Fillat | September 27, 1991
STEVEN SCOTT GALLERY515 N. Charles St. Cornelia Foss: New PaintingsTo view many of this artist's works is to enter her studio, with its carefully placed open books, plates of fruit, vases of Casablanca lilies and a view out the window. Always working from life, Cornelia Foss paints what gallery owner Steven Scott ,, calls "soft focus expressive realism": With rich, urgent brush strokes in a palette of blues, she creates relaxing vistas full of great energy. Gerrit Henry, contributing editor for Art News (who wrote the exhibit catalog essay)
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | August 13, 1992
Robert Seyffert paints both landscapes and cityscapes, and, at least in the group of his works now on display at 819 Gallery, he's much better at the latter.His landscapes -- of Nova Scotia and Brittany -- employ a palette that at times looks unnatural and oddly forced, for no apparent reason. Then, too, as Seyffert's paintings go deeper into space they become less satisfactory; he appears to be less than totally comfortable dealing with far-off horizons and something as vague as sky.The cityscapes, however, are a different story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine Fillat | January 3, 1992
KATZENSTEIN GALLERY729 E. Pratt St. "Experimental Images"Local educators Mary Jacque Benner and Jane Kelly Morais examine the possibilities of computer-generated imagery in this exhibit of recent works. An associate professor of fine art at Loyola College, Ms. Benner photographs cemetery monuments, then manipulates and paints the imagery with the computer, giving new life to an old and, perhaps, forgotten scene. Ms. Morais is an associate professor of art and the art gallery director at Catonsville Community College.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 20, 1994
Of the four artists in a stimulating exhibit currently at Loyola, Symmes Gardner is represented by the fewest works but makes the biggest impression. His paintings, with their active, expressionist brush stroke, tactile surfaces, strong light and imposing forms, grab hold of the viewer and won't let go.In the largest of them, "Sleep," a lone figure lies sleeping in a field under a gray sky. The figure is big and bear-like, but in its unclothed state it...
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | September 21, 1992
It's not surprising that Robert Llewellyn and Don Cook, who have exhibited together before, again share a show at the Nye Gomez Gallery. These artists are interested in schematic representations of, respectively, boats and buildings. Though distinctive in their styles, both tend to treat their rendered objects as pure geometric forms.Mr. Llewellyn, in an artist's statement, mentions the influence of the Chesapeake Bay on his work. His watercolors are anything but pretty representational pictures, however.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gwen Gant | May 17, 1991
TOWSON STATE UNIVERSITYHoltzman Gallery, Fine Arts Center, Osler and Cross Campus drives. Sculptures by Gagik Aroutiunian.This master of fine arts thesis exhibit (through May 26) features works by Soviet-Armenian artist Gagik Aroutiunian, who describes his sculptures as paintings without a picture plane or, in some cases, with the picture plane exploded. He tries to define the gap between painting and sculpture, according to a gallery statement, which adds that "in his treatment of surface he creates texture and colors that intensify the presence of the work spatially."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 24, 1992
Among area shows, sculptors David Yocum and Nicole Fall at Katzenstein make a happy combination, for each is outrageous in an idiosyncratic way. Yocum's pieces combine ceramic, neon, and sometimes acrylic that looks like thick plates of glass, into pieces that have some elements of landscape and also appear futuristic. In some ways they're awful, but they do exert a definite fascination; "Blue Window" looks like a bathroom basin supporting a super large bar of soap with a window in it.Fall's metal sculptures resemble some sort of sea creature mutants that have struggled to shore and are waiting for anything to love them.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 25, 1992
Edda Jakab's charcoal still life drawings at the Katzenstein Gallery are not as pretty as her work in color that I've seen elsewhere, but they have a lot more going for them in other ways. They have definite weight, both physically -- the objects look solid -- and in the fact that there is some emotional content to them, too.A twisted cloth, spiky branches, deep shadows reflect a real and particular character informing these works that one doesn't encounter in the artist's more decorative and immediately appealing pictures.
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