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NEWS
August 22, 1997
Irene McC. Briant, 76, appraiser, antiques restorerIrene McC. Briant, a former appraiser and antiques restorer, died of a heart attack Sunday at Union Memorial Hospital. The Roland Park resident was 76.Born Irene McComas in Manchester, England, she came to the United States in 1930, living in Texas before moving to Baltimore in the 1930s.She retired in 1977 after working 25 years as office manager for Rocchi Construction Co. in Timonium and began a second career as a free-lance appraiser and restorer of ceramics, glass and porcelains, and gold leafing on picture frames.
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NEWS
By Julekha Dash | January 8, 2014
Anne Marie Kellner signed up for a painting class in Ellicott City thinking she would wind up creating a piece of art to hang on her wall. She left the three-hour Chalk Paint tutorial with much larger aspirations. “I'm considering repainting my kitchen cabinets,” Kellner, of Halethorpe, says after taking the class taught by Kelli Myers, the owner of A Journey from Junk. “I went in thinking I would learn a very specific skill, but got a much larger picture of what it's able to do.” Chalk Paint, produced by the Annie Sloan company, creates a vintage-style matte finish.
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NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | February 7, 1999
Early February is the sanctioned time for romance to enter every corner of life, as Valentine's Day approaches. On the assumption that your sweetheart might like something that isn't covered in chocolate, here are some suggestions for gifts that are sweet but not edible.It's time to recall romantic erasMaximal Art's designer, John Wind, gets inspiration from Victorian, Edwardian and antique French sources. The line features watches, bracelets, necklaces, mezuzot, picture frames and clocks.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2003
Charming and whimsical are the words that best describe designer John Wind's handmade items available at Maximal Art, a mail-order and Web shop. Wind takes vintage images from postcards, journals, love letters, photos and wallpaper and incorporates them in hand-assembled keepsake boxes, mirrors, ornaments, jewelry and picture frames. The items are set in antiqued gold plate or silver plate, and are sometimes adorned with glass stones, charms, crystals or pearls. New to the Maximal Art collection are miniature picture frames, featuring original collages of antique images sealed in liquid crystal and set in a 14 karat gold-plated pewter frame.
NEWS
By Julekha Dash | January 8, 2014
Anne Marie Kellner signed up for a painting class in Ellicott City thinking she would wind up creating a piece of art to hang on her wall. She left the three-hour Chalk Paint tutorial with much larger aspirations. “I'm considering repainting my kitchen cabinets,” Kellner, of Halethorpe, says after taking the class taught by Kelli Myers, the owner of A Journey from Junk. “I went in thinking I would learn a very specific skill, but got a much larger picture of what it's able to do.” Chalk Paint, produced by the Annie Sloan company, creates a vintage-style matte finish.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2003
Charming and whimsical are the words that best describe designer John Wind's handmade items available at Maximal Art, a mail-order and Web shop. Wind takes vintage images from postcards, journals, love letters, photos and wallpaper and incorporates them in hand-assembled keepsake boxes, mirrors, ornaments, jewelry and picture frames. The items are set in antiqued gold plate or silver plate, and are sometimes adorned with glass stones, charms, crystals or pearls. New to the Maximal Art collection are miniature picture frames, featuring original collages of antique images sealed in liquid crystal and set in a 14 karat gold-plated pewter frame.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
Sister actThe three O'Hare sisters -- Ann, Patty and Beth -- are of Irish descent. So who better to import antique pine furniture from Ireland, especially as they have backgrounds in antiques and retailing? But Irish antiques are only the beginning of what their new Annapolis shop offers. The Annapolis Furniture Co. (238 West St., [410] 295-7463) has antique reproductions from England; distressed mahogany furniture from Indonesia; wrought iron, glass and wood pieces from Mexico; and pottery and woven goods.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | June 19, 1994
Imagine a table with just a lamp. A vase filled with roses adds color and life, but what really warms the tableau is a family photo. Artifacts that say something about the people who live in a home make visitors feel at ease. But no single accessory warms a room more than a photo of someone or something you love."Personal photographs give your home an identity," says interior designer and author Alexandra Stoddard. "They lend a special spirit to a place. I like to show pictures of my family, my friends and myself everywhere.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Solis-Cohen Enterprises | February 23, 1992
"In the humour people are in here, a man is in danger of becoming invidiously distinguished, who buys any thing in England which our Tradesmen can furnish." So wrote Samuel Morris of Philadelphia in 1765, a time when owning the most fashionable English furnishings was the rage, but the cry "Buy American" was the political reality.Being fashionable then meant luxuriating in the regal rococo style (most Americans call it Chippendale; to the French it's Louis XV). An international aristocratic taste, it was "characterized by a sense of fantasy, elegance and movement, and employed a repertory of shells, scrolls and leafage," according to Morrison H. Heckscher, curator of American Decorative Arts at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
FEATURES
By Toni Stroud and Toni Stroud,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | March 10, 1996
FREDERICKSBURG, Texas -- The biggest difference between Fredericksburg's Main Street and the Las Vegas Strip is the nature of the wagers.OK, so there's not a single slot machine in this heart-of-the-Hill-Country hamlet. But what about the clink-clink-clink at the costume-jewelry counters? No smooth green felt of blackjack tables; no trance-inducing roulette strategy. Ah, but there's the rough homespun of hand-loomed rugs, the catalepsy of deciding just which among a dozen porcelain pillboxes is the prettiest.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1999
Stanley Katzenstein, a downtown picture-framing business owner, died Sunday of cancer at his Mount Washington home. He was 59. Mr. Katzenstein was the second generation of his family to run Ludwig Katzenstein, a company founded in 1940 by his father at Hopkins Place and Pratt Street. About 15 years ago, the shop moved to Scarlett Place on East Pratt Street, and the family opened a branch in Lutherville. "It seemed there wasn't an office in downtown Baltimore that didn't have a picture they framed," said James L. Pierce, owner of a Charles Village framing studio.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | February 7, 1999
Early February is the sanctioned time for romance to enter every corner of life, as Valentine's Day approaches. On the assumption that your sweetheart might like something that isn't covered in chocolate, here are some suggestions for gifts that are sweet but not edible.It's time to recall romantic erasMaximal Art's designer, John Wind, gets inspiration from Victorian, Edwardian and antique French sources. The line features watches, bracelets, necklaces, mezuzot, picture frames and clocks.
NEWS
August 22, 1997
Irene McC. Briant, 76, appraiser, antiques restorerIrene McC. Briant, a former appraiser and antiques restorer, died of a heart attack Sunday at Union Memorial Hospital. The Roland Park resident was 76.Born Irene McComas in Manchester, England, she came to the United States in 1930, living in Texas before moving to Baltimore in the 1930s.She retired in 1977 after working 25 years as office manager for Rocchi Construction Co. in Timonium and began a second career as a free-lance appraiser and restorer of ceramics, glass and porcelains, and gold leafing on picture frames.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
Sister actThe three O'Hare sisters -- Ann, Patty and Beth -- are of Irish descent. So who better to import antique pine furniture from Ireland, especially as they have backgrounds in antiques and retailing? But Irish antiques are only the beginning of what their new Annapolis shop offers. The Annapolis Furniture Co. (238 West St., [410] 295-7463) has antique reproductions from England; distressed mahogany furniture from Indonesia; wrought iron, glass and wood pieces from Mexico; and pottery and woven goods.
FEATURES
By Toni Stroud and Toni Stroud,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | March 10, 1996
FREDERICKSBURG, Texas -- The biggest difference between Fredericksburg's Main Street and the Las Vegas Strip is the nature of the wagers.OK, so there's not a single slot machine in this heart-of-the-Hill-Country hamlet. But what about the clink-clink-clink at the costume-jewelry counters? No smooth green felt of blackjack tables; no trance-inducing roulette strategy. Ah, but there's the rough homespun of hand-loomed rugs, the catalepsy of deciding just which among a dozen porcelain pillboxes is the prettiest.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1995
He was a tough ex-Marine from World War II who would point to the scars on his thigh where the flak went in and then out. He had, a writer with a gift for description once said, a face like a clenched fist. His voice was like gravel, from cigarettes.Hank Bauer was hired by Orioles general manager Lee MacPhail because he had been with an organization that knew how to win -- the New York Yankees. He came in 1963 as a coach under manager Billy Hitchcock, but Hitchcock was dismissed after the season and, after a lengthy search, Bauer took over.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1999
Stanley Katzenstein, a downtown picture-framing business owner, died Sunday of cancer at his Mount Washington home. He was 59. Mr. Katzenstein was the second generation of his family to run Ludwig Katzenstein, a company founded in 1940 by his father at Hopkins Place and Pratt Street. About 15 years ago, the shop moved to Scarlett Place on East Pratt Street, and the family opened a branch in Lutherville. "It seemed there wasn't an office in downtown Baltimore that didn't have a picture they framed," said James L. Pierce, owner of a Charles Village framing studio.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1995
He was a tough ex-Marine from World War II who would point to the scars on his thigh where the flak went in and then out. He had, a writer with a gift for description once said, a face like a clenched fist. His voice was like gravel, from cigarettes.Hank Bauer was hired by Orioles general manager Lee MacPhail because he had been with an organization that knew how to win -- the New York Yankees. He came in 1963 as a coach under manager Billy Hitchcock, but Hitchcock was dismissed after the season and, after a lengthy search, Bauer took over.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | June 19, 1994
Imagine a table with just a lamp. A vase filled with roses adds color and life, but what really warms the tableau is a family photo. Artifacts that say something about the people who live in a home make visitors feel at ease. But no single accessory warms a room more than a photo of someone or something you love."Personal photographs give your home an identity," says interior designer and author Alexandra Stoddard. "They lend a special spirit to a place. I like to show pictures of my family, my friends and myself everywhere.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Solis-Cohen Enterprises | February 23, 1992
"In the humour people are in here, a man is in danger of becoming invidiously distinguished, who buys any thing in England which our Tradesmen can furnish." So wrote Samuel Morris of Philadelphia in 1765, a time when owning the most fashionable English furnishings was the rage, but the cry "Buy American" was the political reality.Being fashionable then meant luxuriating in the regal rococo style (most Americans call it Chippendale; to the French it's Louis XV). An international aristocratic taste, it was "characterized by a sense of fantasy, elegance and movement, and employed a repertory of shells, scrolls and leafage," according to Morrison H. Heckscher, curator of American Decorative Arts at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
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