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By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
As parents, teachers and librarians look ahead to February and Black History Month, it's an opportune time to look back.Thirty years ago, when the civil rights movement was at its height, most public libraries had a handful of children's books that featured African-American characters. In some states, you were lucky to find "The Snowy Day" by Ezra Jack Keats and "Corduroy" by Don Freeman.Now many libraries have shelves of "titles of black interest" in children's sections, and the displays stay up year-round.
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NEWS
February 18, 2013
Author, singer and songwriter Daryl Cobb will promote literacy through the creative arts when he visits Pine Grove Elementary School, in Parkville, on Tuesday, Feb. 19. Cobb's published works include the 2012 children's novel, “Pirates: The Ring of Hope,” and 14 picture books, such as “Bill the Bat Loves Halloween,” “Henry Hare's Floppy Socks,” and “Greta's Magical Mistake.”   Much of his work is written for children, and...
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By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1999
What makes a classic kid's picture book?Nobody is quite sure. There is no question, however, that when a picture book reaches the summit of popularity, it can become immortal.There are a lot of books -- and a lot of kids involved. And a lot of money. And magic.Most authorities on children and learning and many literary professionals seem to agree on some of the qualities that make up the magic. The classics have to do with basic life truths -- bridges to the grown-up world over such terrifying terrain as death, defiance, loneliness and identity.
NEWS
By Ta-Nehisi Coates | October 15, 2012
Let me tell you about the worst thing I ever did to my son. When he was 4, I took him to a small basement apartment in a Manhattanbrownstone. I then paid a man to give my son an intelligence test. The test was an attempt to deliver my son from the chaos of "normal" public school in my adopted hometown of Harlem into a gifted-and-talented program on the tony Upper West Side. My son performed pretty abominably. This did not shake me, as I was not very confident in how well I would have done had I been confronted at age 4 with an "intelligence test.
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By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1997
David Wisniewski was preparing to bite the bullet and put up bathroom molding after breakfasting with his wife and kids at his Frederick home Monday when the phone rang, offering a pretty good reason to delay the project again.That very morning, his sixth book, "Golem," was singled out for the gold star of children's picture books -- the 1997 Randolph Caldecott Medal.Wisniewski didn't even know he was a contender. "Can you make a press conference at 9: 30 a.m.?" the caller from the American Library Association asked.
FEATURES
March 25, 1998
http://www.ala.org/booklist/002.htmlThe Web version of the American Library Association's Booklist Books for Youth includes reviews of approximately 2,500 books - fiction, non-fiction and picture books - aimed at kids from preschool through high school. All reviews are done by in-house editors or education professionals. In addition to a brief description of the story, each write-up contains appropriate age group and the price of the book.Reviewed by Andrea Wilson, Sun news researcherPub Date: 3/25/98
NEWS
February 18, 2013
Author, singer and songwriter Daryl Cobb will promote literacy through the creative arts when he visits Pine Grove Elementary School, in Parkville, on Tuesday, Feb. 19. Cobb's published works include the 2012 children's novel, “Pirates: The Ring of Hope,” and 14 picture books, such as “Bill the Bat Loves Halloween,” “Henry Hare's Floppy Socks,” and “Greta's Magical Mistake.”   Much of his work is written for children, and...
NEWS
December 3, 2000
Advice and strategies to help your children read Editor's Note: Jerdine Nolen today continues her series on Multiple Intelligences with a discussion on visual / spatial intelligence. The first language the brain takes in is not spoken but seen, an array of images and pictures that make up visual (also called spatial) intelligence. Characterized by the ability to perceive, or "see" the world accurately in terms of shapes, specific patterns, designs, color and texture, creativity seeps through this portal, with imagination working in overdrive through the "mind's eye."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1999
WHATEVER YOU think of "whole language," the philosophy that children learn to read by immersion in literature, there's one thing to be said for it:It has filled the shelves of grade school classrooms and literate homes with a wealth of excellent books, many of them astonishingly illustrated. Gone are the stilted language and controlled vocabulary of the old "basal readers," replaced by stories that might have bigger words than beginning readers can read but that take adults and children alike on wild flights of the imagination.
NEWS
By Joy Green and Joy Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2001
During the early 1990s, a group of school librarians recognized that Maryland did not have a statewide award for outstanding children's books. So in 1992, the Maryland Educational Media Organization developed the Black-Eyed Susan Book Award program. That program has blossomed into an annual contest that this year drew votes from 50,000 children throughout Maryland, and is credited by school librarians with drawing welcome attention to a wealth of children's literature that otherwise might have been overlooked.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Somewhere the wild things are roaring their terrible roars and gnashing their terrible teeth and rolling their terrible eyes and showing their terrible claws. They're mourning their creator, children's book author Maurice Sendak, who stepped into his private boat on Tuesday and waved goodbye. The 83-year-old Sendak died Tuesday morning at a hospital in Connecticut, four days after suffering a stroke. "When I heard the news on the radio, it was just a punch in the gut," said Selma Levi, who supervises the children's department of the Central Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library . "I know he was older.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Baltimore Reads hopes to collect 75,000 titles at its 17th annual Books for Kids Day from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday on the parking lot of Poly-Western High School, Falls Road and Cold Spring Lane. The nonprofit organization, dedicated to fostering literacy, will accept new or gently used books and redistribute them through its Book Bank. It collects books for Baltimore-area schools, teachers, Head Start centers, social services agencies, community organizations and needy families. Since the book bank was founded 20 years ago, more than 1.6 million books have been collected and given away.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 27, 2012
Want to do a good deed -- and clean out those books lying around the house? Head to the parking lot of Poly-Western High School next Saturday, May 5, as Baltimore Reads holds its annual Books for Kids Day. At the event, which runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., you can donate new or gently used books that will be redistributed through the organization's Book Bank. The goal: to collect 75,000 books over the coming year. The Baltimore Sun gives hundreds of books to the Book Bank each year -- stack and stacks of review copies that I don't have the time to read.
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By Kellie Woodhouse | February 2, 2012
The idea for Jerdine Nolen's first book sprang from an uneventful summer afternoon almost 25 years ago spent scrubbing the toilet. “I was cleaning my bathroom, and this little voice said, 'Harvey Potter was a very strange fellow indeed,' ” Nolen, 58, recalls as she sits barefoot at her Ellicott City kitchen table sipping tea. “That was the thought that floated up to me. I had no idea what it was attached to, but when you explore through your...
EXPLORE
By Anthony Sclafani | October 6, 2011
Carla Du Pree remembers it well. It was a day like any other, and she decided to make her monthly excursion to Columbia's Second Edition Books and Music, the 16-year-old independent used book store located on the east side of town. Rummaging through the massive shelves stocked with everything from children's nursery rhyme books to picture books of the Big Apple, she eventually chanced upon it - a tome she'd been seeking for as long as she could remember. "I found a first edition of 'A Raisin in the Sun,'" said Du Pree, who is the executive director of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
What was in the water of Montgomery County when director Spike Jonze grew up there? His talented, self-destructive movie version of "Where the Wild Things Are" connects to the woe-is-me side of the childhood psyche. In Jonze's vision of the classic Maurice Sendak picture book, Max, the scamp who escapes to a world of wild things after his mother calls him a wild thing, becomes a needy guy whose new friends echo his own loneliness and melancholy. He's more of a mood-swinger than a vine-swinger.
NEWS
April 15, 1994
The knowledge and appreciation of local history is a glue that keeps communities together and mindful of the perspective of their development. For that reason, it is heartening that so many good picture books have appeared on local history in various parts of Maryland in recent years.The latest news on this front is the release by the Annapolis Publishing Co. of Philip L. Brown's "The Other Annapolis." The handsome volume charts the life of the state capital's African-American community from 1900 to 1950.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Baltimore Reads hopes to collect 75,000 titles at its 17th annual Books for Kids Day from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday on the parking lot of Poly-Western High School, Falls Road and Cold Spring Lane. The nonprofit organization, dedicated to fostering literacy, will accept new or gently used books and redistribute them through its Book Bank. It collects books for Baltimore-area schools, teachers, Head Start centers, social services agencies, community organizations and needy families. Since the book bank was founded 20 years ago, more than 1.6 million books have been collected and given away.
NEWS
By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | December 17, 2006
Charlotte's Web E.B. White Harper Entertainment / 184 pages / $16.99 The summer my son Noah was 5, he went on a Charlotte's Web kick. Or no, not kick: That doesn't quite capture the binge-like insistence of it, the way E.B. White's 1952 children's classic became the centerpiece of his life. For months, we read it to him every night, chapter by chapter, beginning again each time we reached the end. By the time September arrived and Noah's attention had led on to other entertainments, we had read Charlotte's Web perhaps 10 times, and I (who had never loved the book as a child)
NEWS
September 12, 2005
WHAT A TREAT. Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library has started issuing cards especially for the under-6 crowd. First Card users can check out picture books, early-readers and other kids' stuff, helping them get pumped for big-kid school. Plus they get a little slack on the return policy - no late fees. So, say mom or dad accidentally left Leo the Late Bloomer at Aunt Ginny's house for a month and you just got it back and who knows how much you owe on it. No problem, city librarians say, just bring it in and all's forgiven; the important thing is to keep listening to the stories, looking at the pictures and enjoying the reading.
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