Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPickpocket
IN THE NEWS

Pickpocket

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Childs Walker and Laura Loh and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2004
They came to Baltimore not to pick horses, but the pockets of horse-racing fans, police allege. That was the motive, authorities say, behind the actions of an alleged Chicago-based pickpocket ring that was in Baltimore last weekend for the Preakness and is accused of stealing credit cards, cash and jewelry from unsuspecting travelers and others. Two women and two men were taken into custody by police at Baltimore-Washington International Airport on Monday night as they waited to board a plane to Chicago.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
Marie C. Vrany, a retired secretary who once foiled a pickpocket while on vacation in London, died Sunday of complications from a stroke at Carroll Hospital Center. She was 90. The daughter of a Patapsco & Back River Neck railroader and a homemaker, Marie Caroline Schissler was born in Keansburg, N.J. The eldest of five children who were orphaned by the time she was 11, Mrs. Vrany was raised by extended family members who had adjoining farms in Middle River. She was a graduate of St. Elizabeth's Commercial School, where she won awards for typing and stenography.
Advertisement
FEATURES
June 5, 2006
`Pickpocket' At 7 tonight, the Charles The atre's Revival Film Series con tinues with a screening of the 1959 film Pickpocket, written and directed by Robert Bres son. The Charles is at 1711 N. Charles St. Tickets are $8. Call 410-727-3456 or go to the charles.com for more informa tion. FYI Architecture critic Edward Gunts' weekly column does not ap pear today.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 23, 2010
"I've always wanted to hug Santa," the 50-year-old woman said as she hugged a man dressed in a Santa costume on Dec. 19 in Fells Point. She held herself close, rubbed against him - and picked his pocket. As we continue to lament the retirement of Sun reporter Dick Irwin and the demise of the police blotter, we are also thankful that the Baltimore Guide continues to sift through those logs of lesser crimes. The above incident is from their blotter, which doesn't go into details about the crimes, sometimes with comic effect.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | October 5, 1997
1996 Ca' del Solo Big House Red ($12)If Le Cigare Volant was Randall Grahm's breakthrough wine, this is his breakout.The pun-prone owner of Bonny Doon Vineyards has sprung this proprietary red wine blend on the public under an early-release program, but it's no crime when the wine is this tasty.The full-bodied, fresh, mixed-berry flavors are thoroughly beguiling, and the wine's texture is as smooth as a pickpocket's touch.Sure, this red is guilty of a lack of complexity, but it's just fine for a night of sharing pizza and burgers with the usual suspects.
NEWS
December 23, 1999
Robert Bresson, 98, a film director who helped redefine French cinema by focusing on images rather than dialogue, died Saturday in Paris. He was best known for his austere approach and helping pave the way for the New Wave movement.The son of a military officer who once studied to be a painter, he often used untrained actors and coached them to speak in monotones. In the 1959 film "Pickpocket," widely regarded as his best film, Mr. Bresson pared down the compulsive art of lifting wallets to its barest psychological elements.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
Marie C. Vrany, a retired secretary who once foiled a pickpocket while on vacation in London, died Sunday of complications from a stroke at Carroll Hospital Center. She was 90. The daughter of a Patapsco & Back River Neck railroader and a homemaker, Marie Caroline Schissler was born in Keansburg, N.J. The eldest of five children who were orphaned by the time she was 11, Mrs. Vrany was raised by extended family members who had adjoining farms in Middle River. She was a graduate of St. Elizabeth's Commercial School, where she won awards for typing and stenography.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 2, 2006
VIDEO JIHAD -- Budding filmmakers looking for something different should check out the Creative Alliance tomorrow. In the Video Jihad Culture Jam Video Contest, you're given a piece of film (actually a Quicktime or AVI clip) and need to incorporate it into an original work by week's end. Interested creative types should meet at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave., at 7 p.m. tomorrow; the resulting works will be shown June 10 at 7 p.m. The entrance fee is $25, $20 for CA members.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 18, 1994
In the late 1780s, the British officer in charge of the penal colony in Sydney, Australia, decided to have the convicts stage a play in hopes that, unlike a public hanging, it might prove a beneficial example to the participants as well as the spectators.At least that's how the story is told in Timberlake Wertenbaker's play "Our Country's Good," based on Thomas Keneally's historical novel, "The Playmaker."Winner of the 1988 Olivier Award (the British Tony), "Our Country's Good" is receiving its Baltimore premiere at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, and though the script has didactic patches, it makes a strong case for the humanizing properties of the arts.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | October 5, 1994
He was getting out of a cab near a nightspot on Chicago's Rush Street when a woman who wanted the cab started to brush by and bumped into him hard."Oh, I'm so sorry," she said, smiling apologetically and putting her arms out to steady him.Because she was uncommonly pretty, he just smiled and said: "That's OK, take it easy."But then he sensed that something wasn't right, and he reached for the pocket where he kept his wallet. The pocket was empty.He stared at her for a moment. Her smile faded, and she glared back.
FEATURES
June 5, 2006
`Pickpocket' At 7 tonight, the Charles The atre's Revival Film Series con tinues with a screening of the 1959 film Pickpocket, written and directed by Robert Bres son. The Charles is at 1711 N. Charles St. Tickets are $8. Call 410-727-3456 or go to the charles.com for more informa tion. FYI Architecture critic Edward Gunts' weekly column does not ap pear today.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 2, 2006
VIDEO JIHAD -- Budding filmmakers looking for something different should check out the Creative Alliance tomorrow. In the Video Jihad Culture Jam Video Contest, you're given a piece of film (actually a Quicktime or AVI clip) and need to incorporate it into an original work by week's end. Interested creative types should meet at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave., at 7 p.m. tomorrow; the resulting works will be shown June 10 at 7 p.m. The entrance fee is $25, $20 for CA members.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Childs Walker and Laura Loh and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2004
They came to Baltimore not to pick horses, but the pockets of horse-racing fans, police allege. That was the motive, authorities say, behind the actions of an alleged Chicago-based pickpocket ring that was in Baltimore last weekend for the Preakness and is accused of stealing credit cards, cash and jewelry from unsuspecting travelers and others. Two women and two men were taken into custody by police at Baltimore-Washington International Airport on Monday night as they waited to board a plane to Chicago.
NEWS
December 23, 1999
Robert Bresson, 98, a film director who helped redefine French cinema by focusing on images rather than dialogue, died Saturday in Paris. He was best known for his austere approach and helping pave the way for the New Wave movement.The son of a military officer who once studied to be a painter, he often used untrained actors and coached them to speak in monotones. In the 1959 film "Pickpocket," widely regarded as his best film, Mr. Bresson pared down the compulsive art of lifting wallets to its barest psychological elements.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | October 5, 1997
1996 Ca' del Solo Big House Red ($12)If Le Cigare Volant was Randall Grahm's breakthrough wine, this is his breakout.The pun-prone owner of Bonny Doon Vineyards has sprung this proprietary red wine blend on the public under an early-release program, but it's no crime when the wine is this tasty.The full-bodied, fresh, mixed-berry flavors are thoroughly beguiling, and the wine's texture is as smooth as a pickpocket's touch.Sure, this red is guilty of a lack of complexity, but it's just fine for a night of sharing pizza and burgers with the usual suspects.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 1996
NEW YORK -- The year was 1960. Chubby Checker was doing the Twist, Sen. John F. Kennedy was headed for the White House, and Carmen Bilbao, a student at New York University, walked to a movie in Times Square. "It was a better time," she recalls. "I thought it was safe."Then, in the old Apollo Theater on West 42nd Street, Bilbao made the mistake of placing her pocketbook on the empty seat next to hers, making it an easy mark for the thief who lay in wait until the lights went down.So began a curious tale, extending nearly 40 years, for Bilbao and dozens of others who were victimized by a petty criminal (or criminals)
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 23, 2010
"I've always wanted to hug Santa," the 50-year-old woman said as she hugged a man dressed in a Santa costume on Dec. 19 in Fells Point. She held herself close, rubbed against him - and picked his pocket. As we continue to lament the retirement of Sun reporter Dick Irwin and the demise of the police blotter, we are also thankful that the Baltimore Guide continues to sift through those logs of lesser crimes. The above incident is from their blotter, which doesn't go into details about the crimes, sometimes with comic effect.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | October 5, 1994
He was getting out of a cab near a nightspot on Chicago's Rush Street when a woman who wanted the cab started to brush by and bumped into him hard."Oh, I'm so sorry," she said, smiling apologetically and putting her arms out to steady him.Because she was uncommonly pretty, he just smiled and said: "That's OK, take it easy."But then he sensed that something wasn't right, and he reached for the pocket where he kept his wallet. The pocket was empty.He stared at her for a moment. Her smile faded, and she glared back.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.