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Pickett S Charge

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By Nicholas Prindle and Nicholas Prindle,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
The concluding event of the Gettysburg re-enactment highlights the fateful charge led by Confederate Maj. Gen. George Edward Pickett on the third and final day of the Gettysburg campaign. After a bombardment of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge with heavy artillery fire, about 15,000 men - including Pickett's entire division and a portion of A.P. Hill's corps - charged, and briefly breached, the first Union line. While many accounts of Pickett's Charge suggest a back-and-forth battle with victories and losses on either side, the words and deeds of Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock testify to a decisive Union victory that was never really in doubt.
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NEWS
July 22, 2007
In Bel Air, on July 22, 1863, Margaret Webster Bissell sat down to write a memoir of her experiences relating to the Battle of Gettysburg and the search, in the days after the July 1863 battle, for her mortally wounded husband, Capt. William R. Bissell. William Bissell was a prominent businessman who owned Bissell's Gover House, a prosperous inn on Bel Air's Main Street. In 1861, he left Bel Air to join the 8th Virginia Infantry Regiment of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, under the command of Gen. George Pickett.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
As armies of schoolchildren invade Gettysburg, the National Park Service will reopen a popular battlefield attraction today -- the Cyclorama Center, home of a panoramic painting of Pickett's Charge -- after tests for asbestos found safe levels.The circular hall near the visitor center closed Tuesday afternoon, said Katie Lawhon, spokeswoman for Gettysburg National Military Park, after employees opening the building found a 14-inch section of ceiling had fallen in a second-floor lobby entrance.
NEWS
By Tiffany Vallo and Tiffany Vallo,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
In the early morning of July 3, 1863, Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett, who had been assigned to defenses at Richmond, Va., and his troops received orders to engage the Union army and break their front at Gettysburg. By afternoon they returned to the Confederate lines on Seminary Ridge a broken division. The charge, which barely lasted 50 minutes, has been studied and mythicized in the years since the Battle of Gettysburg and has become popularly known as "Pickett's Charge," according to John Heiser, a historian and ranger at the Gettysburg National Park in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 7, 1998
Civil War re-enactment organizers are expecting about 15,000 uniformed participants at events marking the 135th anniversary of the decisive battle at Gettysburg next month.Gettysburg was the largest battle of the Civil War, measured by the number of combatants involved and by what was at stake: control of Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington. Organizers expect this summer's event to be the largest Civil War battle re-enactment that has ever taken place.The event will be held at Bushey Farm, two miles southwest of the Gettysburg National Park at the intersection of Bullfrog and Pumping Station roads.
NEWS
By Mary Leonard and Mary Leonard,Boston Globe | April 4, 1999
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- There's another war raging on the rolling terrain where Pickett's Charge, the deadliest and most horrific encounter in the three-day Civil War battle of Gettysburg, occurred in July 1863. This one is between a small town and the Washington bureaucracy and the forces of commercialism and preservation.Causing the commotion are plans for a visitors center to accommodate crowds of 1.7 million annually at the 5,900-acre Gettysburg National Military Park and the adjacent National Cemetery where President Lincoln gave his immortal address.
NEWS
By Jacqueline Durett and Jacqueline Durett,Special to the Sun | July 4, 1999
The general without a command -- that was Baltimorean Maj. Gen. Isaac Ridgeway Trimble in July 1863, just before Pickett's Charge.Trimble had ridden with Lee to Gettysburg without any official duties, but after Maj. Gen. William Dorsey Pender's death on the second day of Gettysburg, Trimble, who was still on medical leave from wounds received at the Second Battle ofBull Run, was given command of half of Pender's men -- two brigades from North Carolina.Under...
NEWS
By Alec Klein and Jamie Stiehm and Alec Klein and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1998
FREEDOM TOWNSHIP, Pa. -- It was 1:29 on a July afternoon awash in sunlight, and all things still seemed possible.There was still time for the Union troops to take their final positions on the high ground. A country mile across the field, there was still time for Pickett's Charge not to begin, as the Southern writer William Faulkner once wistfully observed in the novel "Intruder in the Dust."Yesterday, as 15,000 Civil War re-enactors played out the final scene of the Battle of Gettysburg, the man who portrayed Gen. Robert E. Lee gazed at the reckless Confederate rush whose outcome could not be changed - even 135 years later.
NEWS
July 22, 2007
In Bel Air, on July 22, 1863, Margaret Webster Bissell sat down to write a memoir of her experiences relating to the Battle of Gettysburg and the search, in the days after the July 1863 battle, for her mortally wounded husband, Capt. William R. Bissell. William Bissell was a prominent businessman who owned Bissell's Gover House, a prosperous inn on Bel Air's Main Street. In 1861, he left Bel Air to join the 8th Virginia Infantry Regiment of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, under the command of Gen. George Pickett.
NEWS
By Tiffany Vallo and Tiffany Vallo,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
In the early morning of July 3, 1863, Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett, who had been assigned to defenses at Richmond, Va., and his troops received orders to engage the Union army and break their front at Gettysburg. By afternoon they returned to the Confederate lines on Seminary Ridge a broken division. The charge, which barely lasted 50 minutes, has been studied and mythicized in the years since the Battle of Gettysburg and has become popularly known as "Pickett's Charge," according to John Heiser, a historian and ranger at the Gettysburg National Park in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Kaylin Rocco and Kaylin Rocco,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
On the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg, at Pickett's Charge, two Vermont regiments from Brig. Gen. George J. Stannard's 2nd Vermont Brigade helped break the charge. The 13th and 16th Vermont Infantry Regiments turned toward the exposed Confederate advance and dispensed point-blank fire into Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett's flank, according to George R. Stewart and his book, Pickett's Charge: A microhistory of the final attack at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863, published in 1959. "Now the long months of tedious close-order drill suddenly paid off for the Vermonters," wrote Stewart.
NEWS
By Nicholas Prindle and Nicholas Prindle,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
The concluding event of the Gettysburg re-enactment highlights the fateful charge led by Confederate Maj. Gen. George Edward Pickett on the third and final day of the Gettysburg campaign. After a bombardment of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge with heavy artillery fire, about 15,000 men - including Pickett's entire division and a portion of A.P. Hill's corps - charged, and briefly breached, the first Union line. While many accounts of Pickett's Charge suggest a back-and-forth battle with victories and losses on either side, the words and deeds of Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock testify to a decisive Union victory that was never really in doubt.
NEWS
By Joseph Esposito and Joseph Esposito,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
Southern hopes for victory at Gettysburg were dashed when Pickett's Charge on July 3, 1863, failed to break the Union army's hold on Cemetery Ridge. Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett's division consisted of brigades commanded by Brig. Gen. Richard B. Garnett, Brig. Gen. James Lawson Kemper and Brig. Gen. Lewis A. Armistead. These three men would lead this charge into well-defended Union territory and into American history. In the morning, Pickett's division marched across Spangler's Woods and formed a battle line east of the woods in the open space behind Seminary Ridge.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2003
GETTYSBURG, Pa. - Heavy equipment tore into a brick motel at the edge of a Gettysburg battlefield yesterday, removing the last commercial enterprise from the site of one of the best-known, if disastrous, maneuvers in the history of war. The demolition of the Home Sweet Home Motel - for years a goal of the National Park Service and preservation groups - began when a 40-foot backhoe dodged piles of snow to knock the back off one of the five buildings that...
NEWS
By Jacqueline Durett and Jacqueline Durett,Special to the Sun | July 4, 1999
The general without a command -- that was Baltimorean Maj. Gen. Isaac Ridgeway Trimble in July 1863, just before Pickett's Charge.Trimble had ridden with Lee to Gettysburg without any official duties, but after Maj. Gen. William Dorsey Pender's death on the second day of Gettysburg, Trimble, who was still on medical leave from wounds received at the Second Battle ofBull Run, was given command of half of Pender's men -- two brigades from North Carolina.Under...
NEWS
By Jacqueline Durett and Jacqueline Durett,Special to the Sun | July 4, 1999
This weekend's re-enactment of the Civil War battle at Gettysburg, Pa., will culminate with a portrayal of Pickett's Charge at 2 p.m. today. The re-enactment battleground is at Bushey Farm, southwest of Gettysburg.Pickett's Charge ended the three-day battle at Gettysburg in 1863 and marked the beginning of a series of Confederate defeats as the Southern invasion force withdrew.After two days of victorious fighting at Gettysburg, Gen. Robert E. Lee, the Confederate commander in chief, decided to do something drastic.
NEWS
By boston globe | July 26, 1998
GETTYSBURG, Pa. - "Nearly inconsolable" after the failure of Union campaigns in the spring of 1862, President Abraham Lincoln called for 300,000 more men to serve nine months in the Union army. Nearly 5,000 Vermonters answered the call.Green soldiers from Vermont's Green Hills, they would play a pivotal role in the most storied battle of the war: the epic July 1-3, 1863, conflict at Gettysburg.After the battle, a New York Times account concluded that a Vermont brigade "did more than any other body of men to gain the triumph which decided the fate of the Union."
NEWS
By Jacqueline Durett and Jacqueline Durett,Special to the Sun | July 4, 1999
This weekend's re-enactment of the Civil War battle at Gettysburg, Pa., will culminate with a portrayal of Pickett's Charge at 2 p.m. today. The re-enactment battleground is at Bushey Farm, southwest of Gettysburg.Pickett's Charge ended the three-day battle at Gettysburg in 1863 and marked the beginning of a series of Confederate defeats as the Southern invasion force withdrew.After two days of victorious fighting at Gettysburg, Gen. Robert E. Lee, the Confederate commander in chief, decided to do something drastic.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
As armies of schoolchildren invade Gettysburg, the National Park Service will reopen a popular battlefield attraction today -- the Cyclorama Center, home of a panoramic painting of Pickett's Charge -- after tests for asbestos found safe levels.The circular hall near the visitor center closed Tuesday afternoon, said Katie Lawhon, spokeswoman for Gettysburg National Military Park, after employees opening the building found a 14-inch section of ceiling had fallen in a second-floor lobby entrance.
NEWS
By Mary Leonard and Mary Leonard,Boston Globe | April 4, 1999
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- There's another war raging on the rolling terrain where Pickett's Charge, the deadliest and most horrific encounter in the three-day Civil War battle of Gettysburg, occurred in July 1863. This one is between a small town and the Washington bureaucracy and the forces of commercialism and preservation.Causing the commotion are plans for a visitors center to accommodate crowds of 1.7 million annually at the 5,900-acre Gettysburg National Military Park and the adjacent National Cemetery where President Lincoln gave his immortal address.
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