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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler joined union workers picketing a Bowie Safeway Tuesday to pressure the grocery giant to concede on the health benefits that are tying up contract negotiations. "This all about awareness," Gansler, who is running for governor, said during a break in convincing shoppers to sign a petition.  Gansler accused Safeway and Giant, which negotiate with the same union, of trying to use provisions of the new federal health law "to take away" health coverage.  "Companies are using the Affordable Care Act to undermine health care," Gansler said.  The United Food and Commerical Workers Local 400, which represents unionized grocery workers Maryland's D.C. suburbs, Washington and northern Virginia, has objected to how Safeway and Giant have dealt with escalating health care costs and the impact of the Affordable Care Act on employers.
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | October 19, 1992
It may soon be all right to carry any foreign flag you please down Main Street in Westminster, but don't try to picket without a permit.The City Council has no plans to change a section of its picketing, parades and demonstrations ordinance that requires permits, despite an American Civil Liberties Union spokesman's view that the way the law has been enforced may infringe on free speech.The council is tentatively scheduled to vote Oct. 26 on a recommendation to repeal two sections of the ordinance that may be unconstitutional: a ban on displaying the flag of any nation at war with or lacking diplomatic relations with the United States; and a provision that the city government can opt to require parade sponsors to post a bond.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Giant Food and Safeway workers, who are negotiating with management over a labor contract that expires Dec. 20, plan to picket Thursday outside a new Giant store in northwest Washington. United Food and Commercial Workers Local 400, one of two UFCW locals representing 28,000 Giant and Safeway workers in the Baltimore-Washington area, organized the "informational picket" planned for the grand opening of Giant at 8th and O streets N.W. Local 400 voted last week to authorize union leadership to call a strike against the supermarket chains if the sides fail to reach an agreement before the contract expires.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | March 30, 1995
During the past four months, Mark Kukucka has spent many lunch hours and weekends picketing the national headquarters of The Ryland Group Inc. in Columbia and some of its new home developments in Baltimore and Howard counties with a sign warning: "I bought a lemon. You could too."The sign symbolizes the tart relationship that has developed between a once-happy customer and a company with a national reputation for well-built homes.Mr. Kukucka's goal in picketing is to make prospective Ryland customers aware of his "disappointment" with a $183,000 Ryland home he purchased in October 1993 in the Parkview Trails development near Security Square Mall.
NEWS
By Morris Freedman | November 13, 1991
A PHONE caller the other day invited me to join a picket line of the full professors of the University of Maryland's English Department to protest budget cuts. I declined. I take picketing very seriously.Picketing should always support a good and large cause, as it normally does in union negotiations, after other forms of discussion and confrontation have proved futile. At the City College of New York in the '30s, students, rightly or wrongly, picketed about profound international issues, like war and peace, or national ones, like civil rights and academic freedom, nothing less.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1994
Lehigh Portland Cement employees took to the streets again yesterday, spending their free time letting people know about what they consider to be hazardous conditions at the Union Bridge plant.But not everyone appreciated the free information.On one side of the county, truck drivers hesitated to enter the Union Bridge plant for fear of breaking a strike line and residents flashed "thumbs up" to encourage the nearly 30 workers who stood by the entrance after ending their shift.Meanwhile, plant manager David H. Roush's neighbors outside Westminster called the police about a dozen people walking quietly up and down the street.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Staff Writer | February 27, 1992
Members of Teamsters Local 557 are picketing a Conrail terminal in Baltimore because the railroad has awarded the work the union once did to a company the union says is employing non-union workers.The pickets are employees of PTL Transportation Services Inc., a Conshohocken, Pa., company that had a contract with Conrail to load and unload trains at the railroad's Bayview intermodal terminal in Baltimore.Last week, PTL employees at Bayview and 14 other Conrail terminals in the Northeast were ordered out on strike by the union to protest Conrail's decision to award the work to contractors employing non-Teamster workers.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | November 11, 2007
TOPEKA, Kan. -- In the quiet shadow of the state Capitol, Bill Duckworth stands just inside the Tool Shed Tap bar and lets out a long sigh. He's a veteran and openly gay member of a community long unhappy about pickets by a virulently anti-homosexual religious group based here. But on this Saturday night, Duckworth says he's still wary about the biggest news in town: the $10.9 million judgment against the group, Westboro Baptist Church, in a Baltimore courtroom. "I felt like it might have been offensive, but that's their right," the 55-year-old printing press worker says of the military funeral protest in Maryland that prompted a deceased Marine's father to sue Westboro.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2000
A judge is scheduled to decide today whether to grant a permanent restraining order against union workers protesting at the Arundel Mills construction site. Circuit Judge Robert H. Heller heard closing arguments yesterday from lawyers representing Carpenters Union Local 101 and Whiting-Turner Contracting Corp., construction manager for the 1.2 million-square-foot mall in Hanover. After an Anne Arundel police officer was injured by a rock thrown by protesters last Thursday, the union agreed to stop picketing at the site until the judge rendered a decision.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
BWI Marshall airport concessions workers held an informational picket before the state Board of Public Works vote Wednesday morning on a massive expansion program that will set the table for more international flights. Workers say they act as good will ambassadors and travel information sources for BWI's millions of annual passengers. But, they say, they don't get medical insurance, sick leave or paid vacations from AirMall USA, the company that manages airport concessions.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
A Baltimore County Councilman is seeking to restrict protesters from picketing outside of schools at certain times, saying it's a matter of protecting children's safety. Councilman Todd Huff introduced legislation Monday that would create a buffer zone of 300 feet outside school entrances where people could not picket while school is in session or within one hour before or after school. The measure would apply to both public and private schools. Violators would face up to a $1,000 fee, imprisonment of up to 90 days, or both.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Three of four protesters arrested during a jobs march this spring at the site of a $1.8 billion East Baltimore urban renewal project appeared in Baltimore District Court Wednesday as demonstrators outside demanded charges be dropped against the "East Baltimore 4. " A June 26 jury trial in Baltimore Circuit Court was set for Thomas Threatt, a self-employed laborer who was charged with resisting arrest during the March protest at the 88-acre redevelopment...
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | March 7, 2011
We can all understand a parent's grief at the sudden death of a child. One parent who should be in our thoughts is Albert Snyder. His son, Marine Lance Cpl. Matthew Snyder, was killed in Iraq in March 2006. Last week, the Supreme Court issued a ruling in a case revolving around the fact that Matthew's funeral, held at St. John's Catholic Church in Westminster, was utilized by members of a Kansas church as a forum to publicize its beliefs, among which is the inclination to give thanks for dead soldiers as a manifestation of God's hatred for the United States.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2011
For many parishioners at St. John Roman Catholic Church in Westminster, the U.S. Supreme Court got it wrong last week. Five years ago this week, St. John held a funeral mass for Marine Lance Cpl. Matthew Snyder that was picketed by anti-gay protesters from the Westboro Baptist Church of Topeka, Kan. Snyder's father sued Westboro for intentional infliction of emotional distress. That case worked its way up to the Supreme Court, which ruled 8-1 last week that the protest — despite the pain it caused — was protected free speech under the First Amendment.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2011
In a dispute that began at a Marine's funeral in Westminster, the Supreme Court ruled 8-1 Wednesday that the First Amendment allows the Westboro Baptist Church to peaceably picket military funerals with its hate-filled, anti-gay messages. "Speech is powerful. It can stir people to action, move them to tears of both joy and sorrow, and — as it did here — inflict great pain," Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote in the majority opinion. "On the facts before us, we cannot react to that pain by punishing the speaker," he continued.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | October 17, 1993
Taxi drivers at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, angry over what they call high rent fees and unfair competition from van and limo drivers, have begun picketing the terminal and handing out fliers to passengers."
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | June 2, 1993
Members of the Maryland chapter of the Rainbow Coalition yesterday criticized public officials from the president to the mayor of Annapolis for failing to speak out on behalf of six black Secret Service agents who allegedly were denied service at the Annapolis Denny's last month.State Del. Salima Siler Marriott of Baltimore and Annapolis Alderman Carl O. Snowden stood in front of Denny's with members of the grass-roots organization Peace-Action and city residents who also allege discriminatory treatment at the restaurant.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Khalil Reid, an African-American student at City Neighbors Charter School, said he has never been denied service at a restaurant because of the color of his skin. He hasn't been turned away at a department store or movie theater either. But he didn't like finding out that was the case for others years ago. On Saturday, the sixth-grader was one of 40 City Neighbors students who formed a picket line at the former Read's drug store at Howard and Lexington streets in Baltimore, where African-Americans were denied lunch counter service in the 1950s.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2011
Flight attendants for AirTran Airways plan to picket at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport and other locations over the next six weeks to protest what the workers view as stalled contract negotiations with the airline. The workers, represented by the Association of Flight Attendants-CWA, say they are frustrated by a lack of progress in contract negotiations and will begin picketing on Monday at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. They plan the last of the protests on Friday, April 1, at BWI. If a tentative agreement is not reached by April 1, picketing will continue in six more cities, the union said in a statement.
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