Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPiccola
IN THE NEWS

Piccola

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | April 10, 1994
WEST POINT, N.Y. -- Brian Piccola and Casey Gordon each scored three goals and led a balanced Blue Jays offense as No. 6 Johns Hopkins defeated Army, 15-8, at Michie Stadium last night.The victory marks the Blue Jays' 12th straight over Army and ended a two-game losing streak. Army (2-5) lost its second straight game and is off to its worst start since 1974.The Cadets held Hopkins (4-3) to two first-quarter goals and trailed 2-1 entering the second quarter. But Hopkins went on two three-goal runs, and Blue Jays goalie Jonathan Marcus stopped 10 shots in that period and held Army to two goals.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 27, 1999
What's in a name? Perhaps a change of direction for a restaurant. It can be subtle -- recently Trattoria La Piccola Roma became Ristorante Piccola Roma when new owners took over.The new owners are Arturo Silvestrini and Fausto Calabria, two aerospace engineers. Silvestrini's wife, Silvana Recine, manages Piccola Roma for them. She's an experienced restaurateur, whose family is involved with several places in Washington. Her vision is to make Piccola Roma a bit more of a white-tablecloth restaurant -- a little less a trattoria -- while not losing its comfortable feeling.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | March 13, 1994
PISCATAWAY, N.J. -- Senior attackman Brian Piccola scored five goals to power fourth-ranked Johns Hopkins (1-1) to an 11-7 victory against No. 15 Rutgers yesterday before a crowd of 1,345 at Rutgers Stadium Complex.Piccola broke a 2-2 first-quarter deadlock with three second-quarter goals as Johns Hopkins took a 6-3 halftime advantage. Johns Hopkins outshot Rutgers 47-37, won 14 of 21 faceoffs and had a 38-30 edge in ground balls.Rutgers drew within 7-5 on Ryan O'Shea's goal with 38 seconds left in the third quarter, but Hopkins won the ensuing faceoff and scored again 12 seconds later.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1997
Little Italy? Ha!Why fight traffic around Camden Yards and Harborplace, then choose between parking in a too-small space on a side street and paying exorbitant rates in a parking lot, when there are excellent Italian restaurants closer to home.There's Trattoria Alberto in Glen Burnie, or La Piccola Roma and Maria's in Annapolis.Trattoria Alberto, in a strip shopping center on Crain Highway near Hospital Drive, is the most unlikely. Across the street from a Hardee's and next to an office supply store with a giant pencil for a sign, it is a refined oasis of Continental flair with food to die for and attentive service that stops just short of fawning.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | April 2, 1995
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -- Senior attackman Brian Piccola scored five goals to lead top-ranked Johns Hopkins to a 13-9 victory over No. 11 North Carolina before 2,000 at Fetzer Field. It was the sixth time that Piccola has scored five or more goals in his career.Attackman Terry Riordan had three goals and an assist and attackman Dave Marr added four assists for Hopkins (6-0).Trailing 9-3 a minute into the second half, the Tar Heels rallied. Carolina scored the last three goals of the third quarter and three of the first five goals of the fourth to cut the lead to 11-9 with 2:51 left.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Staff Writer | May 20, 1993
Brian Piccola has an eye for the open cutter, a willingness t take charge and what the nation's best defenseman admiringly calls "a nasty attitude."Terry Riordan towers over most defensemen and is on course to become the top goal-getter in the history of the most storied program in college lacrosse.Teaming up on attack, Piccola and Riordan helped Johns Hopkins (10-3) gain the No. 4 spot in the final rankings and a first-round bye in the NCAA tournament.The Blue Jays are at Homewood Field on Saturday (2 p.m.)
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | April 26, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- No sooner had Brian Piccola flicked in a fancy shot with his back to Navy's goal than Johns Hopkins teammate Jeff Wills issued a challenge."
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
It was a wearing day for the two Army men who returned to their home state to play in the cradle of lacrosse.Junior Travis Loving, an Arundel High grad, and Lou Kousouris, a freshman out of Gilman seeing his first college action, shared the abuse in the goal in Army's 23-8 loss to No. 1 Johns Hopkins yesterday before 3,542 at Homewood Field."
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Contributing Writer | April 16, 1995
COLLEGE PARK -- Consider the confrontation between the Johns Hopkins offense and the Maryland defense a draw. There were compliments and criticisms, but no concessions.From the Hopkins side: "These are the two best attackmen in the country," Blue Jays coach Tony Seaman said of Terry Riordan and Brian Piccola.In the Maryland corner: "I'll say this every time: Six-on-six, we can play with Hopkins or anyone in the country," Terps senior defenseman Dan Radebaugh said. "It was those dumb penalties.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
Johns Hopkins controlled 15 of 23 faceoffs and won a lot of crucial loose balls for fast breaks against Towson State. Blue Jays sophomore attackman Brian Piccola had six goals by the end of the third period, and most of the crowd was filing out with 14 minutes left in the game.It was that easy.Final score: Johns Hopkins 15, Towson 8 in the quarterfinals o the NCAA Division Itournament last night before a Minnegan Stadium standing-room-only crowd of 7,812, an attendance record.Despite how lopsided the final score was, it was a game unti Piccola scored goals Nos. 4, 5 and 6 in the last seven minutes of the third period to put the Blue Jays ahead 12-7 at the end of the quarter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | January 2, 1997
Baltimore artist Florence Riefle Bahr graduated from the Maryland Institute, College of Art 65 years ago and since then has created paintings, watercolors, collages and sketches of everything from portraits to nature studies to records of public events in which she participated. She has exhibited at both the institute and the Baltimore Museum of Art, as well as at the annual New York show of the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors. An exhibit of her work at the Peabody Institute's Galleria Piccola contains works reflecting her long career and includes a variety of media and subject matter.
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1996
Ask anyone associated with the Johns Hopkins lacrosse program last season, and he can recite the numbers. A year hasn't diminished the memory or the disappointment.The Blue Jays took 19 shots in the first quarter and scored only one goal -- a bad omen. By game's end, they had suffered one of the most agonizing defeats in Hopkins lacrosse history.The Blue Jays were unbeaten and ranked No. 1 going into that NCAA tournament semifinal against Maryland in College Park. Primed for their first championship since 1987, they left with a shocking, 16-8 loss that still lingers among Hopkins players and coaches.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | May 27, 1995
COLLEGE PARK -- The day before the 1995 NCAA men's lacrosse semifinals, Maryland coach Dick Edell sent his team on a tour of the National Zoo in Washington.It was time for a break from what has been a no-nonsense week. Intense. Emotional. Around-the-clock film preparation.Time for Johns Hopkins-Maryland II.The traditional powers will meet today at noon at Maryland's Byrd Stadium in the first semifinal, followed by No. 2 Virginia (12-2) against No. 3 Syracuse (11-2) at 3 p.m. The championship game will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Byrd.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
In Sunday's editions, a Loyola lacrosse player was misidentified in a photo of the Johns Hopkins-Loyola game. The player was Loyola sophomore defenseman Todd Quenzer.The Sun regrets the errors.The nasty boys just got nastier.If there was any doubt about Johns Hopkins being on a mission to win a national championship, the No. 1-ranked Blue Jays erased it by routing No. 8 Loyola, 18-5, yesterday before 4,966 in an NCAA Division I lacrosse quarterfinal at Homewood Field.Hopkins (13-0) will face Maryland, a 14-11 winner over Notre Dame, in a semifinal Saturday in College Park; Syracuse will play Virginia in the other game.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | April 30, 1995
A 13-goal run in the game's final 16 minutes enabled No. 1 Johns Hopkins to pull away and defeat No. 15 Towson State, 24-13, last night at Minnegan Stadium.The loss seemingly ended any chance of postseason play for Towson (5-5), which has one game remaining and entered the season with national championship aspirations."We definitely knew coming in that we had to win this game," said Towson midfielder/defenseman Al Tyler. "It's been a roller-coaster ride of a season for us. Maybe we shouldn't have had that great preseason, when we beat Virginia twice and some other great teams.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Contributing Writer | April 16, 1995
COLLEGE PARK -- Consider the confrontation between the Johns Hopkins offense and the Maryland defense a draw. There were compliments and criticisms, but no concessions.From the Hopkins side: "These are the two best attackmen in the country," Blue Jays coach Tony Seaman said of Terry Riordan and Brian Piccola.In the Maryland corner: "I'll say this every time: Six-on-six, we can play with Hopkins or anyone in the country," Terps senior defenseman Dan Radebaugh said. "It was those dumb penalties.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | May 10, 1992
Matt Panetta and Mike Morrissey took more than diplomas when they left Johns Hopkins last June. They took 42 goals from the lacrosse attack.Coach Tony Seaman wasn't sure what to expect from the attack when fall practice started. He had senior Jeff Wills, the leading returning scorer, and sophomore Brian Piccola, who missed seven games in his freshman season with a broken hand.And he had that big kid arriving from Baldwin, N.Y. In a year or two, Seaman said, he thought Terry Riordan, 6 feet 5, might be a useful college attackman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | January 2, 1997
Baltimore artist Florence Riefle Bahr graduated from the Maryland Institute, College of Art 65 years ago and since then has created paintings, watercolors, collages and sketches of everything from portraits to nature studies to records of public events in which she participated. She has exhibited at both the institute and the Baltimore Museum of Art, as well as at the annual New York show of the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors. An exhibit of her work at the Peabody Institute's Galleria Piccola contains works reflecting her long career and includes a variety of media and subject matter.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
It was a wearing day for the two Army men who returned to their home state to play in the cradle of lacrosse.Junior Travis Loving, an Arundel High grad, and Lou Kousouris, a freshman out of Gilman seeing his first college action, shared the abuse in the goal in Army's 23-8 loss to No. 1 Johns Hopkins yesterday before 3,542 at Homewood Field."
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | April 2, 1995
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -- Senior attackman Brian Piccola scored five goals to lead top-ranked Johns Hopkins to a 13-9 victory over No. 11 North Carolina before 2,000 at Fetzer Field. It was the sixth time that Piccola has scored five or more goals in his career.Attackman Terry Riordan had three goals and an assist and attackman Dave Marr added four assists for Hopkins (6-0).Trailing 9-3 a minute into the second half, the Tar Heels rallied. Carolina scored the last three goals of the third quarter and three of the first five goals of the fourth to cut the lead to 11-9 with 2:51 left.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.