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March 2, 2005
DENNIS ALLEN PICASSO, age 63, died Thursday, February 24, 2005, at Genesis Elder Care Center in Salisbury. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Eugene J. Picasso and Dorothy Benjamin Picasso of Ocean Pines. Mr. Picasso had been employed in sales in the arts and crafts industry. He had been a vocalist for many years lending his talents in the support of many charitable fundraising events. A memorial service will be held on Saturday at 2 P.M. at the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. The Rev. Dr. Harry Wolpert will officiate.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 6, 2013
The town, or more precisely, Harford County, is going to the dogs and cats. At least that's the hope of those at the Humane Society of Harford County who have partnered with the Art Rooms Professional Art Supplies to host a fun competition as a fundraiser. The Art Rooms Professional Art Supplies is inviting artists of all ages and abilities to join them for an art show and benefit to raise funds for the homeless and neglected animals at the Humane Society of Harford County. The Arts Rooms is not looking for Harford County's next Picasso, but they are looking for artists to shine the spotlight on our furry friends and raise funds for their care while having fun and letting the creative juices flow.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 8, 1996
As a portrait of a man behaving badly -- and I don't mean because he has both eyes on one side of his face but because he talked out of both sides of his mouth -- "Surviving Picasso" takes a nasty look at asatyr named Pablo who treated the feminine gender like his own private harem as he smeared his way to fame and glory."
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | August 28, 2012
Evelyn Mogren lets the chips fall where they may nearly every day. After pull-starting her gas-powered chain saw, she deftly applies the tip to a parrot's wing, a fox's tail or a rabbit's fur coat, and their hides and claws begin emerging from blocks of pine. Fragrant chips fly everywhere like rocket-powered confetti, and sawdust blankets the patio at the side of her family's Thunder Hill Road home. It's a paradox unfurling right before an observer's eyes: a vibrating power tool, commonly used to prune trees and harvest firewood, that can just as readily finesse the delicate feathers of a bird, the fine strands of hair on an animal, or a pair of soulful eyes - when guided by skilled hands.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 28, 1994
At 25 by 20 inches, Picasso's painting "Woman with Green Hat" is scarcely monumental in size, but it is in grandeur and significance. And it is now on display at the Phillips Collection in Washington.A portrait of Dora Maar, Picasso's model and mistress of the time, the face is so solid that it looks like a piece of sculpture, and the eyes wear a pensive expression as if thinking of something lost. Painted in October 1939, just after the beginning of World War II, the portrait's expression reflects the uncertainty of its time.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 1, 2007
PARIS -- Two important paintings by Pablo Picasso estimated by police to be worth a total of about $66 million have been stolen from the Left Bank home of his granddaughter Diana Widmaier-Picasso, the authorities said yesterday. Paris police officials said the two oils - Maya With Doll from 1938 and Portrait of Jacqueline from 1961 - were taken from Widmaier-Picasso's house on the Rue de Grenelle in the city's chic Seventh Arrondissement sometime between Monday night or Tuesday morning.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | June 21, 1992
Philadelphia -- If one had to name the single most important episode in the long career of Pablo Picasso, it would probably be that brief period around 1910 when he and Georges Braque created the first phase of cubism (called analytical cubism), thereby revolutionizing modern art.The elements of cubism -- including abandonment of traditional perspective and illusion in favor of analysis of the object from several points of view at once, use of everyday materials, introduction of collage and constructed (rather than modeled or chiseled)
NEWS
By Daniel Grant | June 27, 1993
PICASSO AND DORA:A PERSONAL MEMOIRJames LordFarrar, Strauss & Giroux340 pages; $35 James Lord quickly and easily entered the world of Picasso sycophancy, once the young, somewhat aimless G.I. from New Jersey gained admittance into the artist's studio toward the end of World War II. The unwritten rule was that Picasso was to be admired, amused, listened to (and agreed with) and never contradicted, and Mr. Lord adopted many of Picasso's attitudes as his own. Mr. Lord condescends to the artist's personal secretary, Jaime Sebartes, just as Picasso does; Paulo Picasso, the son from his first marriage, is seen as an object of pity and generally dismissed, also in line with the artist's own thinking.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | June 22, 2007
Picasso at the Lapin Agile, which opened at Chesapeake Arts Center's Studio Theatre Friday, offers exciting entertainment to amuse and often bemuse. Of the many plays I've seen at the Brooklyn Park facility, this one stands out for its ability to transport audiences into a distinctive environment: a striking European cafe-bar. Here at the Cafe Lapin Agile, in comedian Steve Martin's debut as a playwright, is where 23-year-old artist Pablo Picasso and a 25-year-old patent office clerk named Albert Einstein meet by chance in Paris' Montmartre section in 1904.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | January 11, 2006
In an intriguing 1967 book, The Success and Failure of Picasso, critic John Berger argued that the artist's inventive genius largely abandoned him after the stunning breakthroughs that led to the invention of cubism during the years 1908-1914. After the 1930s, Berger wrote, Picasso's capacity for formal invention gradually waned, leaving the by-then world-famous artist with little more to occupy himself than rehashing old formulas that over time became increasingly repetitious and stale.
TRAVEL
January 26, 2011
Picasso exhibit debuts in U.S. Where: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond When: Feb. 19-May 15 What: A traveling exhibition of essential works from Pablo Picasso's personal collection, on its U.S. debut, is making its only East Coast stop at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in February. "Picasso: Masterpieces From the Musee National Picasso, Paris" will include paintings, drawings, sculptures and etchings by the artist and serves as a retrospective covering each notable artistic period of his eight-decade career.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
Fishing line. A syringe. Gum wrappers, a dart board and the handle of a leather suitcase. They're not the scraps some lonely scavenger dug up at the Millersville landfill. To more than 80 artists, they mean what bronze meant to Degas, oils to Monet and Picasso. Life's rubbish is the stuff of the latest show at the Maryland Federation of Art in Annapolis, a national juried exhibition called "Eye of the Beholder: The Art of the Found Object" that opened this week and continues through Aug. 15. It's the first time the MFA, a nonprofit organization with more than 400 members, has officially exhibited found art, a genre that sparked controversy as far back as 1913, when French-born visionary Marcel Duchamp got tongues wagging by presenting a urinal as a work of art. Such pieces forced a reassessment of what "art" is and paved the way for Dadaism in the 1920s, Surrealism in the 1930s, not to mention what is now called found art — art, broadly speaking, that incorporates at least one worldly object.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2009
TODAY AMERICAN CA$INO: This documentary, filmed in Baltimore, explains how the current economic recession affects the working class. The film's premiere screening, to benefit the Community Law Center, takes place at the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road, at 7:30 p.m. The screening is followed by a panel discussion. Tickets are $10. Go to senator.com. PEACHES: Electronic musician Peaches is no peach. Her songs are best known for their explicit lyrics, and her stage shows, which often explore gender identity, can get raunchy.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | June 22, 2007
Picasso at the Lapin Agile, which opened at Chesapeake Arts Center's Studio Theatre Friday, offers exciting entertainment to amuse and often bemuse. Of the many plays I've seen at the Brooklyn Park facility, this one stands out for its ability to transport audiences into a distinctive environment: a striking European cafe-bar. Here at the Cafe Lapin Agile, in comedian Steve Martin's debut as a playwright, is where 23-year-old artist Pablo Picasso and a 25-year-old patent office clerk named Albert Einstein meet by chance in Paris' Montmartre section in 1904.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 1, 2007
PARIS -- Two important paintings by Pablo Picasso estimated by police to be worth a total of about $66 million have been stolen from the Left Bank home of his granddaughter Diana Widmaier-Picasso, the authorities said yesterday. Paris police officials said the two oils - Maya With Doll from 1938 and Portrait of Jacqueline from 1961 - were taken from Widmaier-Picasso's house on the Rue de Grenelle in the city's chic Seventh Arrondissement sometime between Monday night or Tuesday morning.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | January 11, 2007
To Noi Volkov, a simple faucet, a model of a Ford Thunderbird and photos of Marilyn Monroe and Woody Allen are more than just odds and ends. To him, they are the makings for a ceramic teapot. "I am trying to create a new, unorthodox style of ceramics," said the 60-year-old Owings Mills man. "It's a mixture of Renaissance and pop art. It has a little bit of Dali and some Picasso." The teapot uses the back of the T-bird model as a handle, the faucet as the spout, and images of Monroe and Allen on either side of the body.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 12, 1998
Consider Pablo Picasso and Abbie Hoffman.The legendary modern artist and the 1960s radical would seem to have nothing in common. But both have been portrayed on stage by Paul Provenza, actor and stand-up comedian. And he isn't joking when he points out shared characteristics."They were incredibly passionate, incredibly dedicated to their endeavors," says Provenza, who played Hoffman in a 1994 Los Angeles production of a play called "The Chicago Conspiracy Trial" and is currently playing Picasso in Steve Martin's "Picasso at the Lapin Agile."
NEWS
By Howard Reich and Howard Reich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 2002
CHICAGO - A prominent Chicago art collector who has donated extensively to the Art Institute of Chicago has emerged at the center of a dispute over a $10 million painting by Pablo Picasso that was looted by the Nazis during World War II. Today, a California Superior Court judge will decide whether Marilynn Alsdorf, who has served as a trustee for the Museum of Contemporary Art, may temporarily keep in her possession Picasso's 1922 oil Femme en blanc (also...
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 2, 2006
Part portrait of the artist and part political thriller, Ariel Dorfman's Picasso's Closet -- receiving its world premiere at Washington's Theater J -- is primarily a "what if" play. Dorfman, a playwright exiled from his adopted country of Chile, writes about Pablo Picasso when the Spanish artist was himself in exile, living in Nazi-occupied Paris during World War II. Though little is known of him during that period, Picasso survived to live another three decades. But what if the artist had been murdered by the Nazis in 1944?
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANNA EISENBERG | February 2, 2006
BLACK HISTORY MONTH EARLY BLACK MOVIES / / Enjoy screenings of three films related to Black History Month. The movies were made in the 1930s and 1940s and are three of many "race films," which featured all-black casts. Race films were shown at "Midnight Rambles," which were all-black segregated movie houses. Get a glimpse of black history by watching Broken Strings, Murder in Harlem and Reet Petite and Gone at the Creative Alliance. ....................... These screenings are at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave. "Broken Strings" will be shown Wednesday, "Murder in Harlem" will be shown Feb. 15 and "Reet Petite and Gone" will be shown Feb. 22. All films start at 8 p.m. Call 410-276-1651 for more information.
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