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By RAY FRAGER | February 20, 1994
See, the '60s weren't so bad; they helped produce Picabo Street.CBS' breezy personality piece -- which included her parents' hippie roots -- and Street's own free-spirited nature on camera during competition were a highlight of last night's prime-time Olympic show.Hey, CBS, give her a sitcom instead of Tom Arnold. Here's a theme song: "Can you tell me how to get, how to get to Picabo Street . . ."Sleep on itBjorn Dahlie, Norway's cross country skiing hero in Lillehammer, has insomnia. Has he tried watching Pat O'Brien on CBS' late-night show?
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By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
OGDEN, Utah -- For the past decade, in America's eyes, the sun only shined on one female downhill skier: Picabo Street. Anyone else was just a name, and not much more. Ready or not, that era ended last week when Street skied her final competitive race, finishing 16th in the downhill. She didn't qualify for the U.S. team in the super-G, an event she won at the Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, in 1998, so she won't be around to defend her title at Snowbasin today at 10 a.m. The biggest beneficiaries of Street's retirement will likely be a quartet of Americans -- Caroline Lalive, Jonna Mendes, Kirsten Clark and Kathleen Monahan.
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SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
ODGEN, Utah - Picabo Street has waited a long time to get one last shot at an Olympic medal. Waiting one more day apparently doesn't make much difference to her. Winds gusting to 20 mph near the top of the Wildflower course led to the postponement of the Olympic women's downhill yesterday. Officials delayed the start of the race several hours before calling it off and rescheduling the event for today. "I'm not too disappointed; it happens in skiing," Street said. "We're pretty used to it on the World Cup. Tomorrow they're expecting a good day with half the wind."
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
ODGEN, Utah - Picabo Street has waited a long time to get one last shot at an Olympic medal. Waiting one more day apparently doesn't make much difference to her. Winds gusting to 20 mph near the top of the Wildflower course led to the postponement of the Olympic women's downhill yesterday. Officials delayed the start of the race several hours before calling it off and rescheduling the event for today. "I'm not too disappointed; it happens in skiing," Street said. "We're pretty used to it on the World Cup. Tomorrow they're expecting a good day with half the wind."
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | February 22, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- For the second straight Olympics, all the best American moments, all the best stories, all the best lessons, came from the women.Michael Johnson was pretty good in Atlanta, but not as memorable as Kerri Strug. Dream Team II was pretty good, but not as memorable as the women's gymnastics, basketball, soccer and softball teams.In Nagano, the difference was even more pronounced.You'll remember skier Picabo Street, speed skater Chris Witty and the women's hockey players, figure skaters Tara Lipinski and Michelle Kwan.
SPORTS
By Jody Meacham and Jody Meacham,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 23, 1994
LILLEHAMMER -- Eva Twardokens reads the sports pages these days with a mix of disbelief and bemusement.Another mediocre ballplayer is signing a deal for a sum that will set him up for life. Michael Jordan gets a contract to play baseball, which he hasn't played since his school days.She has made some good money in sports, too -- more than $100,000 in her best seasons on the World Cup ski tour -- but that's not the kind of income that pays off the mortgage in Santa Cruz, puts a fourth car in the garage and tides you over the rough times.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
OGDEN, Utah -- For the past decade, in America's eyes, the sun only shined on one female downhill skier: Picabo Street. Anyone else was just a name, and not much more. Ready or not, that era ended last week when Street skied her final competitive race, finishing 16th in the downhill. She didn't qualify for the U.S. team in the super-G, an event she won at the Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, in 1998, so she won't be around to defend her title at Snowbasin today at 10 a.m. The biggest beneficiaries of Street's retirement will likely be a quartet of Americans -- Caroline Lalive, Jonna Mendes, Kirsten Clark and Kathleen Monahan.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
RINGEBU, Norway -- She's the daughter of flower children from the 1960s.Father Roland, a k a "Stubby," has a scrubby beard, a ponytail and an American flag draped over his back and wants to build pyramids that last forever."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Kevin Van Valkenburg | February 8, 2002
1. Security. The security plan cost $300 million, so it had better work. Spectators may face a two-hour wait to get through the "mag and bag" metal detector and handbag search areas at all venues. No-fly zones will be in effect over Salt Lake City while President Bush attends the opening ceremony and Vice President Dick Cheney goes to the closing ceremony; other times, the zones will be over each of the 10 venues. The downtown has been fenced in, and 15,000 law-enforcement and military personnel will be on city streets and mountainous back country.
NEWS
February 23, 1994
They are holding the Winter Olympics in the right place. More fans turned out to watch cross-country skiers and ski jumpers in Norway than go to a Super Bowl. In zero degrees, Norwegians like nothing better than to camp out for a glimpse of cross-country skiers swishing by. These sports aren't exotic, quadrennial novelties for the Norwegians. Speed skater Johann Olav Koss and cross-country skiers Bjorn Daehlie and Vegard Ulvang are household names. Lillehammer is an ideal site for the Winter Olympics.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Kevin Van Valkenburg | February 8, 2002
1. Security. The security plan cost $300 million, so it had better work. Spectators may face a two-hour wait to get through the "mag and bag" metal detector and handbag search areas at all venues. No-fly zones will be in effect over Salt Lake City while President Bush attends the opening ceremony and Vice President Dick Cheney goes to the closing ceremony; other times, the zones will be over each of the 10 venues. The downtown has been fenced in, and 15,000 law-enforcement and military personnel will be on city streets and mountainous back country.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | February 22, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- For the second straight Olympics, all the best American moments, all the best stories, all the best lessons, came from the women.Michael Johnson was pretty good in Atlanta, but not as memorable as Kerri Strug. Dream Team II was pretty good, but not as memorable as the women's gymnastics, basketball, soccer and softball teams.In Nagano, the difference was even more pronounced.You'll remember skier Picabo Street, speed skater Chris Witty and the women's hockey players, figure skaters Tara Lipinski and Michelle Kwan.
SPORTS
By Jody Meacham and Jody Meacham,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 23, 1994
LILLEHAMMER -- Eva Twardokens reads the sports pages these days with a mix of disbelief and bemusement.Another mediocre ballplayer is signing a deal for a sum that will set him up for life. Michael Jordan gets a contract to play baseball, which he hasn't played since his school days.She has made some good money in sports, too -- more than $100,000 in her best seasons on the World Cup ski tour -- but that's not the kind of income that pays off the mortgage in Santa Cruz, puts a fourth car in the garage and tides you over the rough times.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
RINGEBU, Norway -- She's the daughter of flower children from the 1960s.Father Roland, a k a "Stubby," has a scrubby beard, a ponytail and an American flag draped over his back and wants to build pyramids that last forever."
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 20, 1994
See, the '60s weren't so bad; they helped produce Picabo Street.CBS' breezy personality piece -- which included her parents' hippie roots -- and Street's own free-spirited nature on camera during competition were a highlight of last night's prime-time Olympic show.Hey, CBS, give her a sitcom instead of Tom Arnold. Here's a theme song: "Can you tell me how to get, how to get to Picabo Street . . ."Sleep on itBjorn Dahlie, Norway's cross country skiing hero in Lillehammer, has insomnia. Has he tried watching Pat O'Brien on CBS' late-night show?
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | January 30, 1994
PARIS -- Austrian skier Ulrike Maier, a two-time world champion and the only mother on the Alpine circuit, died yesterday after crashing and breaking her neck during a World Cup downhill race in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.Maier, 26, lost control of her right ski in a narrow section of the 1.7-mile course while traveling at about 65 mph. She hurtled off the course, slammed into a timing post, lost her helmet and tumbled several times before sliding limply to a stop in the middle of the run.Medical staff and race officials attempted unsuccessfully to revive Maier with mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and heart massage.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | January 24, 1996
Ever so quietly, city cable franchiser TCI left a nice little Christmas present for subscribers with the permanent addition of ESPN2 to its channel lineup, and there may be another nice little bundle under the tree by year's end.Lynette Locke, public and community affairs coordinator, said TCI added the 2-year-old channel to the system on channel 43 on Christmas Eve, a move that had been long awaited.TCI did not choose to add ESPN2 when it launched in October 1993, but twice reached temporary agreements with the channel to air feeds of Canadian Football League playoff games involving the Baltimore franchise in the 1994 and 1995 seasons.
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