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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 23, 2004
What's the first thing you think of when someone says "chamber music"? No, not "boring." Only people who have never given chamber music a proper try would say that. Most likely, the response would be "string quartet," since there are so many examples of how composers have found an ideal means of expression in this combination of two violins, viola and cello. But another instrumental foursome would be just as deserving a response to this association game: "piano quartet." Newcomers to chamber music may conjure up an image of four keyboards, but a piano quartet consists of violin, viola, cello and piano.
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By Tim Smith | January 26, 2010
When it opened in the spring of 2006, the Performing Arts Theater in the University of Baltimore's Student Center boasted an attractive, intimate ambience and good acoustics - not to mention a new, nine-foot Steinway piano chosen for the room, by no less than eminent pianist Yefim Bronfman. Different classical music enterprises have come and gone in that 200-seat space, including a chamber series featuring Baltimore Symphony Orchestra players and a piano recital series. Nothing has taken hold.
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By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2008
The fall concert season is action-packed this weekend with three diverse offerings for classical music lovers of all ages. On Saturday, the Columbia Orchestra hosts its annual Young People's Concert, while Candlelight Concert Society presents the Los Angeles Piano Quartet. On Sunday, the Orchestra of St. John's makes its debut with a tribute to Ralph Vaughan Williams. For young folks, Saturday's performance of Sergei Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf at 12:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theatre is a good bet. Inspired by his commitment to musical education for children, Prokofiev composed text and music to this 1935 symphonic fairy tale, which introduces the instruments of the orchestra.
NEWS
By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2008
The fall concert season is action-packed this weekend with three diverse offerings for classical music lovers of all ages. On Saturday, the Columbia Orchestra hosts its annual Young People's Concert, while Candlelight Concert Society presents the Los Angeles Piano Quartet. On Sunday, the Orchestra of St. John's makes its debut with a tribute to Ralph Vaughan Williams. For young folks, Saturday's performance of Sergei Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf at 12:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theatre is a good bet. Inspired by his commitment to musical education for children, Prokofiev composed text and music to this 1935 symphonic fairy tale, which introduces the instruments of the orchestra.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2003
The combination of violin, viola, cello and piano has inspired fewer compositions than the twin violin-viola-cello string quartet arrangement that has occupied virtually every composer of note since the mid-18th century. But the composers drawn to this somewhat rare mini-symphonic format have been some of the greatest ever. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's two piano quartets are absolutely top-drawer. Johannes Brahms, Robert Schumann, Antonin Dvorak and Gabriel Faure are just a few of the others who have scaled the heights of the genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | April 25, 2002
There's music everywhere you turn this weekend. Here are just two of the many events worth checking out: The Chiara String Quartet, which has been making a name for itself since being formed in 1993, will offer an appealing program on the Evergreen Carriage House Concert Series. There will be a rare performance of Charles Ives' Quartet No. 1, along with Beethoven's Op. 18, No. 3, and Debussy's indelible String Quartet. The concert is at 8 p.m. tomorrow at Evergreen, 4545 N. Charles St. Tickets are $15. Call 410-516-0341.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 5, 1990
Last night in Shriver Hall the Cantilena Piano Quartet played a sleepy program in a sleepy manner. The piano quartets of Aaron Copland and Gabriel Faure (No. 1 in C Minor) are fairly strong pieces, but combining them with the Vincent D'Indy piano quartet made for an evening that sometimes felt like swimming upstream in syrup. It was a snoozerama.The playing didn't help matters. The ensemble of the Cantilena players (pianist Frank Glazer, violinist Edna Michell, violist Philipp Naegele and cellist Steven Thomas)
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 19, 1996
Aaron Jay Kernis, "Colored Field" (Concerto for English horn and orchestra), performed by Julie Ann Giacobassi and the San Francisco Symphony, Alastair Neale conducting, and "Still Movement With Hymn," performed by Pamela Frank, violin, Paul Neubauer, viola, Carter Brey, cello, and Christopher O'Riley, piano (Argo 448 174-2):"Colored Field," which was commissioned by the San Francisco Symphony for its English hornist, Julie Ann Giacobassi, is a beautiful and demanding work that lasts more than 40 minutes.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 2001
St. John's College's Great Hall will be echoing with the sounds of great music in the coming weeks when the faculty and guest artists of the Heifetz Institute turn Annapolis into a summer music festival. Daniel Heifetz, professor of violin at the University of Maryland, College Park, has brought together an impressive roster of teachers and distinguished visitors for the Annapolis-based summer institute program, which offers six weekends of concert fare with emphasis on some of the greatest chamber music ever composed.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 13, 2004
The latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program lists only one composer, Johannes Brahms, but there really are two - as-is Brahms, and after-extreme-makeover Brahms. The real McCoy is represented by the grandly scaled Piano Concerto No. 2, the gussied up one by the Piano Quartet No. 1, as extravagantly orchestrated by Arnold Schoenberg. Thomas Dausgaard, principal conductor of the Danish National Symphony, brought to the program exceptional communication skills in his BSO debut Thursday night at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
NEWS
By Judah E. Adashi and Judah E. Adashi,special to the sun | January 25, 2008
In this primary season, politicians seeking to establish a broadly appealing, post-partisan identity might take their cue from ensembles such as the Enso String Quartet. Following a century in which the politics of musical style often dictated the aesthetic direction of composers and musicians, the Enso Quartet is among a growing number of chamber groups devoted not to any style or period, but simply to good music, superbly played. Co-founded in 1999 at Yale University by violinist Maureen Nelson and cellist Richard Belcher, the Enso Quartet has since been joined by violinist John Marcus and violist Melissa Reardon.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 13, 2004
The latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program lists only one composer, Johannes Brahms, but there really are two - as-is Brahms, and after-extreme-makeover Brahms. The real McCoy is represented by the grandly scaled Piano Concerto No. 2, the gussied up one by the Piano Quartet No. 1, as extravagantly orchestrated by Arnold Schoenberg. Thomas Dausgaard, principal conductor of the Danish National Symphony, brought to the program exceptional communication skills in his BSO debut Thursday night at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 23, 2004
What's the first thing you think of when someone says "chamber music"? No, not "boring." Only people who have never given chamber music a proper try would say that. Most likely, the response would be "string quartet," since there are so many examples of how composers have found an ideal means of expression in this combination of two violins, viola and cello. But another instrumental foursome would be just as deserving a response to this association game: "piano quartet." Newcomers to chamber music may conjure up an image of four keyboards, but a piano quartet consists of violin, viola, cello and piano.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 20, 2003
Last weekend, like most weekends, musical activity was plentiful. I picked out four events and found rewards at each. The National Symphony Orchestra's week-long residency at the University of Maryland School of Music on the College Park campus culminated with a side-by-side performance with the UM Symphony Orchestra Friday night at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. James Ross, director of orchestral activities at UM, led the first half. Perhaps his reserved gestures accounted for the reserved, bland playing of Dvorak's Scherzo Capriccioso.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2003
The combination of violin, viola, cello and piano has inspired fewer compositions than the twin violin-viola-cello string quartet arrangement that has occupied virtually every composer of note since the mid-18th century. But the composers drawn to this somewhat rare mini-symphonic format have been some of the greatest ever. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's two piano quartets are absolutely top-drawer. Johannes Brahms, Robert Schumann, Antonin Dvorak and Gabriel Faure are just a few of the others who have scaled the heights of the genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2003
Grand finale The Baltimore Masterworks Chorale, formed by about 50 members of the former Baltimore Symphony Chorus, closes out its inaugural season with a program this weekend called Beginnings and Endings. Music director Mark Hardy's selections include In the Beginning, a 1947 work by great American composer Aaron Copland for mezzo-soprano and chorus, with a text drawn from the Book of Genesis. The "endings" part of the concert refers to the ending we all must face, represented by the 1936 Requiem by remarkable British composer Herbert Howells.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2001
Mozart's music has the power to turn even the deepest and most gifted among us into wide-eyed children. "I am in love with Mozart like a young girl," wrote the Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard. "Mozart," said the great 19th-century composer Antonin Dvorak, "is sunshine." We'll all have the chance to sit in awe of Salzburg's eternal wunderkind Friday when faculty members of the Heifetz International Institute, Annapolis' own summer music festival, present an all-Mozart concert in St. John's College's Great Hall.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 4, 1990
Maryland Stage Company to present tribute to Samuel 0) BeckettIn memory of Samuel Beckett, who died last December, the Maryland Stage Company will present "A Tribute to Samuel Beckett," three of the influential Irish playwright's short plays, beginning Thursday at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. A symposium on Beckett will be held Saturday at 9:30 p.m.The plays, "Not I," "Ohio Impromptu" and "Rockaby," will be directed by Xerxes Mehta, artistic director of the Maryland Stage Company, the resident professional troupe at UMBC.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | April 25, 2002
There's music everywhere you turn this weekend. Here are just two of the many events worth checking out: The Chiara String Quartet, which has been making a name for itself since being formed in 1993, will offer an appealing program on the Evergreen Carriage House Concert Series. There will be a rare performance of Charles Ives' Quartet No. 1, along with Beethoven's Op. 18, No. 3, and Debussy's indelible String Quartet. The concert is at 8 p.m. tomorrow at Evergreen, 4545 N. Charles St. Tickets are $15. Call 410-516-0341.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2001
Mozart's music has the power to turn even the deepest and most gifted among us into wide-eyed children. "I am in love with Mozart like a young girl," wrote the Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard. "Mozart," said the great 19th-century composer Antonin Dvorak, "is sunshine." We'll all have the chance to sit in awe of Salzburg's eternal wunderkind Friday when faculty members of the Heifetz International Institute, Annapolis' own summer music festival, present an all-Mozart concert in St. John's College's Great Hall.
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