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By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | September 19, 1991
GULANGYU, China -- This small island takes its name from the drum-like sounds once sent up from the rush of the sea through a hollowed-out rock along its southeast shoreline. But these days Gulangyu is better known for the sound of piano music.By day the hilly outcropping, a half-mile offshore in the harbor of ,, the southeastern Chinese city of Xiamen, is a busy place catering to thousands of Chinese tourists. The narrow streets of its business district -- lanes only wide enough for an elderly woman carrying two buckets of pineapples on a pole across her shoulders to pass -- are lined with open-air shops brimming with curios and beach paraphernalia.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 29, 2009
While many folks will be making last-minute checks on stashes of beer and munchies Sunday, others will be spending the pre-Super Bowl hours reveling in baroque music. "SuperBach Sunday" is a long-running annual presentation by Pro Musica Rara, Baltimore's intrepid early-music organization. This year's concert features the return of two fine guests, soprano Ann Monoyios and trumpeter John Thiessen. The concert, which promises music by Bach, Handel and Purcell, will be at 3:30 p.m. at Towson University's Center for the Arts, Osler and Cross Campus drives.
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TRAVEL
By LORI SEARS | December 4, 2005
Alexandria by Candlelight Take an evening stroll through Old Town Alexandria, Va., Saturday. The annual Historic Alexandria Candlelight Tours feature three sites this year: Gadsby's Tavern Museum, Carlyle House (shown at right) and Lee-Fendall House. A free shuttle will run between the sites throughout the evening. The self-guided holiday tours include caroling, 18th-century dancing and hot cider at Gadsby's; a look at 19th-century decorations and costumes, choral performances and piano music at Lee-Fendall House; and a display of seasonal greens and the sounds of live period music at Carlyle House.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
You cannot imagine," Franz Liszt wrote, "how it spoils one to have been a child prodigy." Still, Liszt turned out just fine, enjoying enormous success as a pianist and composer, the kind of dual career that may well be in store for a prodigy born 16 years ago in China. His name is Peng Peng, and he makes his Baltimore debut Saturday in a recital that includes works of Brahms and Debussy, as well as his own music. No stranger to the concert stage - he made his recital debut at 8, his orchestral debut at 10 - Peng Peng can be heard on a just-out Naxos CD playing the heck out of Liszt's Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Nashville Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leonard Slatkin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 25, 1999
It is 40 years since Leon Fleisher's appointment as Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Piano at the Peabody Conservatory of Music. The conservatory celebrates the anniversary this week with a three-day festival in Fleisher's honor.The festival concludes Wednesday evening with a black-tie, by- invitation-only dinner in the George Peabody Library. Actress Claire Bloom will act as mistress of ceremonies to titled nobility and musical luminaries who have come from all over the globe to honor Fleisher.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 28, 1991
Gunnar Johansen, a Danish-born pianist of extraordinary energy and scope, died Saturday at his home in Blue Mounds, Wis. He was 85.He died of liver cancer, said his wife, Lorraine Johnson Johansen.Mr. Johansen was the first musician to be appointed artist in residence at an American university. He held that post at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, from 1939 to 1976, during which he taught at the school and performed several series of concerts on the radio.Among these were traversals of the Schubert and Beethoven Sonatas and the complete keyboard works of Chopin and Mozart.
FEATURES
By Robert A. Masullo and Robert A. Masullo,McClatchy News Service | July 22, 1992
Some 1,000 unfidgety, detail-minded people have come to Sacramento, Calif., this week from all parts of the United States and Canada to tune up.No, they're not auto mechanics.They're members -- or potential members -- of the Piano Technicians Guild, a Kansas City-based international association of piano tuners and technicians, who are meeting for their 35th annual convention. More than 50 pianos have been brought into the hotel for their use.The main reason for one to come to the convention is to attend classes -- such as "The Science of Wool, Felt and Hammers," "Secrets of the Superglues" and "Shop Procedures for Fun and Profit."
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 8, 2007
At first glance, the nearly room-width, ceiling-high filing cabinets that fill an impossibly compact corner of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center at the University of Maryland, College Park suggest a repository of dry academic records. But the items neatly stored on these shelves are alive with the sound and significance of music -- specifically keyboard music, and a full century's worth, at that. Welcome to the International Piano Archive at Maryland, or IPAM, as it's known on campus.
FEATURES
By KAROL V. MENZIE | July 12, 1998
A net gain in romanceWhat could be more romantic during a hot, hazy summer than a bed coolly swathed in mosquito netting? IKEA has taken most of the hassle out of hanging such drapery, with a system that employs a bamboo hoop to hold the netting and a simple hook to hang it up. Add white bed linens, a potted palm and a tiny !B bamboo table, and you could be in Luxor, Tangiers or Pondicherry. The net and its hardware, called Bryne, costs $29.95 at IKEA, 8352 Honeygo Blvd. in White Marsh.* Step into the past for an old-fashioned ice cream sundae social today from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Union Mills Homestead, 3311 Littlestown Pike, Westminster.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1995
Shoppers at this Towson grocery store never miss a beat.Live piano music, piped through the store, follows them from the produce department to the frozen foods section at the Metro Food Market on Goucher Boulevard near Joppa Road."
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 8, 2007
At first glance, the nearly room-width, ceiling-high filing cabinets that fill an impossibly compact corner of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center at the University of Maryland, College Park suggest a repository of dry academic records. But the items neatly stored on these shelves are alive with the sound and significance of music -- specifically keyboard music, and a full century's worth, at that. Welcome to the International Piano Archive at Maryland, or IPAM, as it's known on campus.
TRAVEL
By LORI SEARS | December 4, 2005
Alexandria by Candlelight Take an evening stroll through Old Town Alexandria, Va., Saturday. The annual Historic Alexandria Candlelight Tours feature three sites this year: Gadsby's Tavern Museum, Carlyle House (shown at right) and Lee-Fendall House. A free shuttle will run between the sites throughout the evening. The self-guided holiday tours include caroling, 18th-century dancing and hot cider at Gadsby's; a look at 19th-century decorations and costumes, choral performances and piano music at Lee-Fendall House; and a display of seasonal greens and the sounds of live period music at Carlyle House.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 8, 2003
Mozart and Tchaikovsky lived roughly a century apart - and were light-years apart emotionally - but had in common an effortless gift for ear-catching melody. Although Mozart could do infinitely more with his melodies than Tchaikovsky (or anyone else, for that matter), Tchaikovsky, at his best, could mold ideas into structures of Mozartean proportion and symmetry. That's one good reason to pair these two composers on a program, as the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has done. Another is that Tchaikovsky positively worshiped Mozart's music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Benny Evangelista and Benny Evangelista,San Francisco Chronicle | June 5, 2000
A new high-tech piano could be the perfect toy for the musically challenged dot-com magnate with extra cash to burn. Lots of extra cash. The glitzy, chip-powered Yamaha Disklavier Pro 2000, on display recently in San Francisco, can literally play itself and run its own video of the pianist. It's so talented it can recreate an evening with the late George Gershwin, with the same flair and style of the master himself. The fully loaded musical instrument has enough power to make the common desktop PC jealous.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 22, 2000
This review appeared in some editions on Saturday. The latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program celebrates pianos, pianists and composers who were great pianists. For good measure, it throws in a whimsical poet and a veteran of stage and screen who knows how to milk a good verse. It's quite an evening, without a dull minute in it. On Friday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the electricity gained in intensity as the number of keyboards in use declined -- Mozart's Concerto for Three Pianos, Saint-Saens' "Carnival of the Animals" for two pianos and orchestra, Rachmaninoff's powerhouse D minor Piano Concerto.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 19, 2000
In a world that adores orchestras, Leif Ove Andsnes is a believer in chamber music. "I feel, in a way, that chamber music is kind of the essence of music making for me," says the 29-year old Norwegian pianist. He particularly admires the way chamber works emphasize a sense of communion within the playing. "If I have a successful week with an orchestra, it would often feel like playing chamber music," he says. "I mean, if you play a concerto like the Schumann -- this is pure chamber music with the orchestra."
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 29, 2009
While many folks will be making last-minute checks on stashes of beer and munchies Sunday, others will be spending the pre-Super Bowl hours reveling in baroque music. "SuperBach Sunday" is a long-running annual presentation by Pro Musica Rara, Baltimore's intrepid early-music organization. This year's concert features the return of two fine guests, soprano Ann Monoyios and trumpeter John Thiessen. The concert, which promises music by Bach, Handel and Purcell, will be at 3:30 p.m. at Towson University's Center for the Arts, Osler and Cross Campus drives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
You cannot imagine," Franz Liszt wrote, "how it spoils one to have been a child prodigy." Still, Liszt turned out just fine, enjoying enormous success as a pianist and composer, the kind of dual career that may well be in store for a prodigy born 16 years ago in China. His name is Peng Peng, and he makes his Baltimore debut Saturday in a recital that includes works of Brahms and Debussy, as well as his own music. No stranger to the concert stage - he made his recital debut at 8, his orchestral debut at 10 - Peng Peng can be heard on a just-out Naxos CD playing the heck out of Liszt's Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Nashville Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leonard Slatkin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 25, 1999
It is 40 years since Leon Fleisher's appointment as Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Piano at the Peabody Conservatory of Music. The conservatory celebrates the anniversary this week with a three-day festival in Fleisher's honor.The festival concludes Wednesday evening with a black-tie, by- invitation-only dinner in the George Peabody Library. Actress Claire Bloom will act as mistress of ceremonies to titled nobility and musical luminaries who have come from all over the globe to honor Fleisher.
FEATURES
By KAROL V. MENZIE | July 12, 1998
A net gain in romanceWhat could be more romantic during a hot, hazy summer than a bed coolly swathed in mosquito netting? IKEA has taken most of the hassle out of hanging such drapery, with a system that employs a bamboo hoop to hold the netting and a simple hook to hang it up. Add white bed linens, a potted palm and a tiny !B bamboo table, and you could be in Luxor, Tangiers or Pondicherry. The net and its hardware, called Bryne, costs $29.95 at IKEA, 8352 Honeygo Blvd. in White Marsh.* Step into the past for an old-fashioned ice cream sundae social today from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Union Mills Homestead, 3311 Littlestown Pike, Westminster.
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