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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | September 21, 2006
Jay's on Read hits all the right notes. Mount Vernon's new piano bar opened about a month ago and is already getting a warm response from the neighborhood. The place definitely deserves it. "People came, liked it, and brought their friends back," said owner Jay LaMont. "It's growing, and the reaction's good." Last Saturday night, Jay's, which holds 75, was comfortably full by 11 p.m. A sharp-dressed doorman checked our IDs and let us in. There's no cover charge, which makes up for the semi-expensive drink menu.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2011
Dick Smith, who was there when the place opened 31 years ago, was back at his piano bar in Phillips Seafood Sunday afternoon, the last day of business at Harborplace for the last of the original tenants. Smith played "As Time Goes By," and longtime customers gathered on the high chairs around his piano to enjoy the song and a final crab cake. "I was here the day it opened and the piano has not moved from this spot," said Smith, who played and led sing-alongs in the restaurant in Harborplace's Light Street Pavilion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Opening a restaurant is no easy undertaking. Finding the right mix of food, decor and staff is hard enough, but making sure everything runs smoothly takes extreme focus. Te Amo , a new Spanish tapas restaurant and piano bar on O'Donnell Square in Canton, seems a bit preoccupied. Housed in the space that used to be Cosmopolitan, Te Amo is split into a downstairs bar area and an upstairs open dining room and piano bar. You can seat yourself on either floor. But the a lack of a hostess in the front or at the top of the stairs can make it confusing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Opening a restaurant is no easy undertaking. Finding the right mix of food, decor and staff is hard enough, but making sure everything runs smoothly takes extreme focus. Te Amo , a new Spanish tapas restaurant and piano bar on O'Donnell Square in Canton, seems a bit preoccupied. Housed in the space that used to be Cosmopolitan, Te Amo is split into a downstairs bar area and an upstairs open dining room and piano bar. You can seat yourself on either floor. But the a lack of a hostess in the front or at the top of the stairs can make it confusing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | September 27, 1991
Central Station, now open at the Mount Vernon site formerly occupied by the interesting Oriental-French restaurant JaFe and then briefly by Flamingo's, aims to be a restaurant and something more. It has a saloon, restaurant, piano bar and game room spread over its compact two floors, in effect offering a pTC different level of entertainment every time you climb stairs.Nightlifers will mostly gravitate to the first floor saloon, which was packed with a see-and-be-seen crowd on a recent visit.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | May 21, 1993
Fred Loose's piano bar was covered with flowers yesterday, as more than 200 people jammed into the Topside Inn for a boisterous wake to honor the man who tickled the ivories and everyone's fancy there until he died Sunday.An extended eclectic family of musicians, relatives, friends and bar regulars hoisted their glasses in tribute to the 70-year-old Mr. Loose at the Galesville restaurant overlooking the West River where he had played for more than 19 years."I throw the best wakes," said Elizabeth Kinzie, Topside's owner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | July 13, 2006
In the next month or so, a number of new bars are set to open across the city, and at least one more will undergo major renovations. Here's a quick rundown: Bedrock Billiards Late this month or early next month, Washington's Bedrock Billiards will christen a new location at 401 W. Baltimore St. - the building formerly occupied by the Vault. Expect to see about 15 beers on tap, an electronic jukebox, billiards, full-size shuffleboard, darts and TVs. The upstairs, downstairs and basement spaces will be painted in vibrant colors and decorated in a retro-cool theme, said Jonathan Maxson, corporate events sales and marketing director for Bedrock Management.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
There's general disagreement on which standard Fred Loose was playing to a full house Sunday when he died: "Little Coquette," or "I Don't Want To Set the World on Fire" or "I Don't Know Why I Love You Like I Do."But there's general agreement on this: The 70-year-old Mr. Loose made Galesville's Topside Inn a jumpin' joint, a year-round local favorite and summertime watering hole for boaters.The piano-playing Mr. Loose, who led the Topside Jammers every Sunday, slid off his stool at 6:10 p.m. and died.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | February 23, 2006
At 7:45 p.m. Friday, Power Plant Live's plaza lies nearly empty. Here, it's too early for lines to snake out of Bar Baltimore or Have a Nice Day Cafe, but a few people wait at the entrance to Howl at the Moon. Inside, the piano bar's already packed, with standing room only. Two men sit at a pair of black pianos on a small stage, both nailing the keys while one belts out "Banana Boat Song (Day-O)" from the middle of Howl at the Moon. A drum kit and bass guitar are also onstage but go unused most of the night.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
The two lawyers in their 60s turned about 40 when they walked into the Owl Bar. They stepped back into the warmth and comfort of an earlier time.Claude L. Callegary and Morris Lasover, Baltimore natives, joined several hundred people yesterday in celebrating the reopening of the Owl Bar in the old Belvedere Hotel. The bar had been closed about two years.The stately old hotel, fraught with financial troubles much of its 89 years, had been sold and turned into condominiums."All the great social events of the city were held here," said Mr. Callegary, who drank his first beer at the Owl Bar in 1950 when he was a law student at the University of Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | September 21, 2006
Jay's on Read hits all the right notes. Mount Vernon's new piano bar opened about a month ago and is already getting a warm response from the neighborhood. The place definitely deserves it. "People came, liked it, and brought their friends back," said owner Jay LaMont. "It's growing, and the reaction's good." Last Saturday night, Jay's, which holds 75, was comfortably full by 11 p.m. A sharp-dressed doorman checked our IDs and let us in. There's no cover charge, which makes up for the semi-expensive drink menu.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | July 13, 2006
In the next month or so, a number of new bars are set to open across the city, and at least one more will undergo major renovations. Here's a quick rundown: Bedrock Billiards Late this month or early next month, Washington's Bedrock Billiards will christen a new location at 401 W. Baltimore St. - the building formerly occupied by the Vault. Expect to see about 15 beers on tap, an electronic jukebox, billiards, full-size shuffleboard, darts and TVs. The upstairs, downstairs and basement spaces will be painted in vibrant colors and decorated in a retro-cool theme, said Jonathan Maxson, corporate events sales and marketing director for Bedrock Management.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | February 23, 2006
At 7:45 p.m. Friday, Power Plant Live's plaza lies nearly empty. Here, it's too early for lines to snake out of Bar Baltimore or Have a Nice Day Cafe, but a few people wait at the entrance to Howl at the Moon. Inside, the piano bar's already packed, with standing room only. Two men sit at a pair of black pianos on a small stage, both nailing the keys while one belts out "Banana Boat Song (Day-O)" from the middle of Howl at the Moon. A drum kit and bass guitar are also onstage but go unused most of the night.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | May 21, 1993
Fred Loose's piano bar was covered with flowers yesterday, as more than 200 people jammed into the Topside Inn for a boisterous wake to honor the man who tickled the ivories and everyone's fancy there until he died Sunday.An extended eclectic family of musicians, relatives, friends and bar regulars hoisted their glasses in tribute to the 70-year-old Mr. Loose at the Galesville restaurant overlooking the West River where he had played for more than 19 years."I throw the best wakes," said Elizabeth Kinzie, Topside's owner.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
There's general disagreement on which standard Fred Loose was playing to a full house Sunday when he died: "Little Coquette," or "I Don't Want To Set the World on Fire" or "I Don't Know Why I Love You Like I Do."But there's general agreement on this: The 70-year-old Mr. Loose made Galesville's Topside Inn a jumpin' joint, a year-round local favorite and summertime watering hole for boaters.The piano-playing Mr. Loose, who led the Topside Jammers every Sunday, slid off his stool at 6:10 p.m. and died.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
The two lawyers in their 60s turned about 40 when they walked into the Owl Bar. They stepped back into the warmth and comfort of an earlier time.Claude L. Callegary and Morris Lasover, Baltimore natives, joined several hundred people yesterday in celebrating the reopening of the Owl Bar in the old Belvedere Hotel. The bar had been closed about two years.The stately old hotel, fraught with financial troubles much of its 89 years, had been sold and turned into condominiums."All the great social events of the city were held here," said Mr. Callegary, who drank his first beer at the Owl Bar in 1950 when he was a law student at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2011
Dick Smith, who was there when the place opened 31 years ago, was back at his piano bar in Phillips Seafood Sunday afternoon, the last day of business at Harborplace for the last of the original tenants. Smith played "As Time Goes By," and longtime customers gathered on the high chairs around his piano to enjoy the song and a final crab cake. "I was here the day it opened and the piano has not moved from this spot," said Smith, who played and led sing-alongs in the restaurant in Harborplace's Light Street Pavilion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Te Amo didn't serve out a year in the Canton's Cosmopolitan space. In a May dining review that turned out, unfortunately to be, prophetic, John Houser said that Te Amo needed "to take a hard look at what it is and decide what to do to fix it. " Part Spanish tapas restaurant and part piano bar, Te Amo was all over the place, Houser said. No word just yet on the Dog Ba r, another Canton project from the same owners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | September 27, 1991
Central Station, now open at the Mount Vernon site formerly occupied by the interesting Oriental-French restaurant JaFe and then briefly by Flamingo's, aims to be a restaurant and something more. It has a saloon, restaurant, piano bar and game room spread over its compact two floors, in effect offering a pTC different level of entertainment every time you climb stairs.Nightlifers will mostly gravitate to the first floor saloon, which was packed with a see-and-be-seen crowd on a recent visit.
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