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EXPLORE
June 8, 2011
Missions and Masterworks presents "An Encore Performance," Friday, June 10, 7:30 p.m., at First United Methodist Church of Laurel, 424 Main St. Light refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. Laurel resident Mack Statham and his son, Robert, perform classical piano music, including two-piano renditions of music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonin Dvorak and Sergei Rachmaninoff. Proceeds will support the Thanksgiving in July Mission Project to benefit Price House, Talbot House and Reality House, which provide residential programs for adults battling addiction in the Laurel area.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Lori Sears and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
The true mettle and value of a musician is how naturally he can perform live. And on stage, Billy Joel is one of pop music's best, a seasoned veteran who's genuine, at ease and funny. There are no elaborate dance numbers, no over-the-top sets, no trickery, explosions or guitar-smashings. It's just Billy and his top-notch, eight-member band on a simple but classy set -- with large video screens and color lighting ... and 20-plus classic rock/pop songs that have made up the soundtrack of many lives.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2011
Evelyn B. Butterhoff, whose spirited barroom playing and renditions of Tin Pan Alley classics took her from the old Emerson Hotel to the Glenmore Tavern on Harford Road — and many places in between — died April 11 of dementia at the Hamilton Center, a Northeast Baltimore nursing facility. She was 86. Evelyn Beck was born in Baltimore and raised in the 400 block of Curley St. By age 7, she was studying piano with a neighborhood teacher, and by 1937 was studying with Jack Rohr at Hammann Music Co. at 206 N. Liberty St. in downtown Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The worlds of pop and classical music do not meet all that often — or all that well, as a rule — but certain artists have proved quite adept at bridging the gap. Ben Folds is one of them. The Winston-Salem, N.C.-born, Nashville-based songwriter and pianist has been on an international tour billed as the Ben Folds Orchestra Experience. The tour brings him to Charm City on Thursday for a concert with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, which first joined Folds in a gig nine years ago. That 2005 program featured Folds songs enhanced with orchestral arrangements.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
In 2009, Baltimore singer/songwriter ellen cherry was temporarily sidelined with a nasty throat infection. Unable to sing, she sat down at her upright piano and began writing the songs which would later become her new album, "Please Don't Sell the Piano. " It's about as bare-bones as you can get; while there are a few string arrangements, most of the album is just the piano and cherry's intimate, heartwarming voice. Produced by Baltimore Americana singer/songwriter Caleb Stine, "Please Don't Sell the Piano" is cherry's most personal album.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 12, 2007
Piano enthusiasts who subscribe to the Anne Arundel Community Concert Association and South County Concert Association are in luck this month. A reciprocal agreement entitles members of either group to attend the other's concerts, so some from both groups were treated Friday to a classical concert by award-winning Russian pianist Alexandre Moutouzkine. In two weeks, at Southern High School, another award-winning classical pianist, California-raised Alpin Hong, will peform. Moutouzkine, 26, revealed a delightful and offbeat sense of humor in his introductions to his musical selections, suggesting that Chopin's "Three Songs" might have been motivated by the composer's intent to captivate young ladies, a goal he apparently achieved.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 9, 2002
Lang Lang Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 3. Scriabin: Etudes. Lang Lang, pianist; St. Petersburg Philharmonic; Yuri Temirkanov, conductor. (Telarc SACD-60582) **** Audiences who have already heard Lang Lang in person know what to expect when this young Chinese pianist gets near a piano - spontaneous (and contagious) combustion. With his technical fireworks, interpretive passion and imagination, and unalloyed enthusiasm for every note, he's one of the most exciting talents to emerge in years.
NEWS
October 17, 2001
The student: Hannah Park, 12 School: Clarksville Middle Special achievement: Hannah won first prize in the junior division of the Gertrude S. Brown Memorial Piano Competition, sponsored by the Maryland State Music Teachers Association. Why the piano is her favorite instrument: "I enjoy playing because I have talent on the piano," Hannah said. "It exercises my fingers. My fingers are really long. The piano fits me well. I can express my feelings through the music and how I play." Her favorite composer: She prefers Chopin "because he writes a lot of romantic songs."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 22, 2000
This review appeared in some editions on Saturday. The latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program celebrates pianos, pianists and composers who were great pianists. For good measure, it throws in a whimsical poet and a veteran of stage and screen who knows how to milk a good verse. It's quite an evening, without a dull minute in it. On Friday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the electricity gained in intensity as the number of keyboards in use declined -- Mozart's Concerto for Three Pianos, Saint-Saens' "Carnival of the Animals" for two pianos and orchestra, Rachmaninoff's powerhouse D minor Piano Concerto.
NEWS
May 26, 2003
Gertrude Elizabeth Brandau, a homemaker, died Wednesday at her Pasadena home. She was 96. Born Gertrude E. Cowman in Baltimore and raised on Rutland Avenue, she attended Eastern High School. Family members said that at age 7 she was helping to support her family by scrubbing marble steps and the floors of a neighborhood drugstore and confectionery. She was allowed to keep a nickel of the $1.70 she earned each week so she could go to the Saturday movies with her sisters. From 1922 to 1926, she was a cashier at the old E.H. Koester Baking Co. on West Saratoga Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Even in a group of overachievers, Monica Lopez-Gonzalez would likely stand out. The 30-year-old native Baltimorean has two bachelor's degrees - in French and psychology - and an M.A. and Ph.D. in cognitive science, all from the Johns Hopkins University, where she recently did a stint as a postdoctoral fellow researching "the cognitive neuroscience of artistic creativity. " "The joke among my friends is that I'm such a nerd that I will get another Ph.D. so I can put 'Ph.D.²' after my name," said Lopez-Gonzalez, who currently does consulting work in the field of data visualization.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Gulay U. Lannon, a homemaker who enjoyed playing the piano and singing, died June 7 of cancer at her daughter's Rodgers Forge home. She was 75. The former Gulay Ulular was born and raised in Samsun, Turkey, where she graduated from a French-American high school. She met her future husband, Cormac Martin Lannon, while he was serving with the U.S. Air Force in Turkey. They were married in 1963 and later settled in Mount Washington. Her husband, a civil engineer who retired as head of construction management for the city Department of Public Works, died in 2009.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 14, 2014
Youthful playing comes naturally for George Li, because the pianist is only 18 years old. This precocious talent performs for the Candlelight Concert Society on Saturday, March 22, at 8 p.m., at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. His program covers a lot of musical territory. The classicism of the late 18th century is represented by the Haydn Sonata in B minor, Hob. XVI: 32. He moves into mid-19th-century romanticism with two works by a master of writing for the keyboard, Chopin's Nocturne in B Major and Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | February 6, 2014
Yury Shadrin and Tian Lu have got the keyboard covered for an upcoming Sundays at Three concert. This husband and wife duo will play music written for piano four hands on Sunday, Feb. 9, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Besides their joint performances as Shadrin and Lu, they have individual performing careers. Those busy schedules include much activity on the local classical music scene. As a duo, they were finalists in the 2013 Rising Stars competition that is part of the Howard County Arts Council's annual Celebration of the Arts.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | January 16, 2014
Beethoven was such a prolific composer that classical music organizations never run out of material when presenting all-Beethoven programs. Such concerts often focus on specific aspects of that great German composer's output. This certainly will be the case when the Amelia Piano Trio appears for Candlelight Concerts on Saturday, Jan. 25, at 8 p.m., at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. The upcoming concert is billed as Beethoven Complete Piano Trios Concert No. 3. The third and final installment in this Candlelight project, the concert features Beethoven's Trio in E-flat Major, Op. 1, No. 1; Trio in B-flat Major, Op. 11 "Gassenhauer"; and Trio in D Major, Op. 70, No. 1 "Ghost.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Rachel A. Pines, a classically trained pianist who later changed careers and became chief learning officer for a business consulting company, died Nov. 7 of breast cancer at the Cancer Treatment Center in Philadelphia. The former Mount Washington resident was 63. Born in Chicago, the former Rachel Arlene Bolotin was raised in Northbrook, Ill., and graduated in 1968 from North Shore Country Day School. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1972 from Pomona College, she moved to Baltimore, where she enrolled at the Peabody Institute and studied under noted pianist Leon Fleisher.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 25, 1990
Kevin Kenner, the 1990 Chopin Piano Competition winner las weekend, already has enough concert and recording offers to keep him busy the next two years and he can finally kiss 10 years of "miserable" piano competitions goodbye.The 1989 Peabody Conservatory graduate who will appear in Baltimore Tuesday, Salisbury Nov. 29 and Frederick Dec. 1, has reaped this harvest since his Warsaw victory as top (though second-prize) winner:* After the 8:15 p.m. Peabody concert Tuesday at Friedberg Concert Hall, he leaves next week for seven recitals in 10 days in Germany.
EXPLORE
September 16, 2013
Hayley Schindler of Bel Air became a Paderewski Medal winner following the 2013 National Piano Guild auditions in Baltimore in May. She received the award for successfully performing a national level program, 10 or more pieces, for each of 10 years. A student of Carolyn Dorsey since the age of 6, Hayley has also competed in the Harford County annual Piano Festival, achieving first and second honors for several years. Hayley is also an accomplished trumpet player and performs with the symphonic orchestra, the jazz band and the marching band at Patterson Mill High School.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
The clench of arthritis had quieted Reinecke's fingers last year, leaving the classically trained pianist, 93, unable to lift her right arm and play as she had for decades. As a couple of dozen friends and students packed into Reinecke's Catonsville living room Saturday afternoon, the music returned for the first time since her shoulder replacement surgery a year ago, filling the space with the sounds of Frederic Chopin, Sergei Rachmaninov and Claude Debussy. "I think life is a commission to be," Reinecke said after her performance.
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