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NEWS
January 11, 2010
COLLEGE PARK - The University of Maryland has received a $10.3 million federal grant to build an advanced physics lab. The university plans to use the money to build a 21,000-square-foot Laboratory for Advanced Quantum Science. The underground lab space will be part of the Physical Sciences Complex, set for completion in 2013. Officials say Maryland was among 11 universities and one nonprofit research group to receive the construction grants for new research facilities. - Associated Press
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Towson University police are investigating several off-campus, early morning robberies in the past two weeks. In three incidents since Sept. 7 police said victims were walking to or from apartment buildings when they were approached. In one on Sept. 11, in the 6300 block of York Road, north of Walker Avenue, the suspects were armed with handguns and knives. Two other cases, about a block away, in the 500 block of Castle Dr., on Sept. 7 and 16, police say suspects used physical force.
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NEWS
July 31, 2013
I read your editorial about the safety of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge and found it laughable ( "Risking the bridge," July 24). First, you can not politicize physics, whose laws are immutable. In the effort to get better fuel economy auto manufacturers have been making lighter cars. And trucking companies have been putting longer, heavier rigs on the road than when the bridge was built. What does all this mean? A long heavy truck hitting a light car will impart a great deal of energy to the car. The Jersey walls are curved from bottom to top, so when hit by vehicle's wheel, the curve carries the whole vehicle upward along the curve.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | September 14, 2014
Domestic violence is an issue that has been on the minds of many people in recent days, prompted by the horrifying abuse committed by Ray Rice against his now-wife. His status as a professional football player, coupled with the fact that the attack was captured on video and has been seen by millions, has helped to shine a bright light on this often-neglected yet serious societal problem. Lesser known but not less tragic was the murder of Jessica Meredith Jacobsen, mother to two young boys, by her estranged husband exactly two years ago today in front of their Baltimore County home.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2012
Dr. Zlatko Tesanovic, a Johns Hopkins University physics professor who advised his visiting academic colleagues where they should eat in Baltimore, died of an apparent heart attack July 26 at the George Washington University Hospital in Washington, D.C., after collapsing at Reagan National Airport. The Canton resident was 55. Born in Sarajevo in what was then Yugoslavia, he earned his undergraduate degree in physics in 1979 from the University of Sarajevo. He then received a Fulbright Fellowship and attended the University of Minnesota, where he earned a doctorate in physics in 1985.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
Dr. Julius Henry "Jute" Taylor, who was a physics professor at what is now Morgan State University for 37 years and also headed the department, died Aug. 27 of heart failure at his Windsor Hills home. He was 97. The son of a brick mason and a homemaker, Dr. Taylor, one of six children, was born and raised in Cape May, N.J. He was a 1932 graduate of Middle Township High School, where he played basketball, was a champion pole vaulter and played trumpet in the high school band.
NEWS
By JOHN MURDOCK | August 15, 2006
How important are initiatives like the "physics-first" program being implemented in Carroll County? Consider this: Although physics is the fundamental branch of science - the bedrock on which much of our knowledge is built - many American students never even take physics in school. It is primarily designated as an elective for 11th- and 12th-grade students. Even the students who do take physics in U.S. schools are not doing well compared with students in other countries. The 1995 administration of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study compared the average achievement of students in science literacy and physics at the end of secondary school.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Professor James Gates delivers his big ideas in analogies and metaphors. Setting lax standards for schoolchildren in science classes is like teaching them to dunk a basketball on a 9-foot-high hoop, when kids the next town over play with one 10 feet high, the state school board member says. Without diversity of thought and perspective among collaborating scientists, you get nothing but classical music, the physicist argues. "When you let different people create different music, you get things like rock 'n' roll, jazz," Gates said.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2001
W. Richard Stroh, a retired Goucher College physics professor who had wide-ranging interests, including the Towson community chorus, died Monday of cardiac arrest at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 78. Dr. Stroh joined the faculty of Goucher in 1962 and was a professor of physics when he retired in 1981. He was chairman of the physics department from 1964 to 1977. He specialized in acoustics and seismology at what was then an all-female college and tried to interest students in physics through curricular innovations such as installing a seismograph, said Frederic O. Musser, a retired special assistant to the Goucher president.
NEWS
October 29, 2006
William T. Moorefield, a former physics professor at Towson University, died Oct. 21 of congestive heart failure at his home in Towson. He was 85. Mr. Moorefield, who grew up in Hampden, was fascinated by science from an early age. He met his wife, the former Helen Klinke, at a summer science course at Druid Hill Park when they were teenagers. "He was a big tease," she said. "He was supposed to show us how to use the insect nets to catch butterflies, but instead he would catch bees and show them to the girls and make them scream."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
Dr. Michael Beer, former chairman of the department of biophysics at the Johns Hopkins University who was an environmentalist who worked diligently to clean up and protect Stony Run and the Jones Falls, died Aug. 22. He was 88. Dr. Beer was dining with his companion, Patricia Laidlaw, at her Roland Park home when he was stricken with a heart attack. He was taken to Union Memorial, where he was pronounced dead, said his daughter, Suzanne C. Beer of Middle River. "In the early days of molecular microscopy he was one of the key figures," said Dr. Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, chairman of the department of biophysics at the Johns Hopkins University.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A chain of more than 50 mid-Atlantic physical therapy clinics that rebranded itself Pivot Physical Therapy earlier this month has added five clinics in West Virginia, officials said Wednesday. The chain has 37 facilities in Maryland, some of which were known as Maryland SportsCare & Rehab. Operations won't change at the facilities, but officials believe operating as one organization enables the company to leverage the reputation of more than 500 physical therapists, certified athletic trainers and support staff.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | August 24, 2014
COLLEGE PARK -- L.A. Goree was small enough as a freshman at Maryland in 2010 that former Terps coach Ralph Friedgen asked Goree to switch from linebacker to safety. Goree was a contributor for Maryland even while lacking prototypical size. But he is bigger and stronger than he has ever been as he enters his senior season. After weighing just 205 pounds as a freshman, the 6-foot-2 Goree began preseason camp earlier this month weighing 245 pounds. Goree increased his weight to 235 pounds heading into last year and put on 17 pounds this offseason after finishing last year weighing 228. “I've never been 245 in my life,” said Goree, a Bowie native who played at C.H. Flowers High School.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | August 19, 2014
Two recent major developments may revolutionize major college sports, potentially to the benefit of long-exploited college athletes. It's about time. On August 7 the National Collegiate Athletic Association decreed that the five major conferences - the University of Maryland's former and new conferences, the ACC and the Big Ten; plus the Big 12, PAC-12 and the SEC - shall have greater autonomy to develop policies that specifically meet their needs. Experts believe the five conferences' 65 member universities could, among other changes, begin to pay annual stipends for student-athletes and cover their tuition and other scholastic costs after their eligibility has expired.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
TORONTO -- Before Wednesday's game, Orioles manager Buck Showalter raved about the reports from right-hander Dylan Bundy's start at High-A Frederick on Tuesday, when he threw 4 1/3 scoreless innings, allowing just five hits while striking out seven batters and issuing no walks. “It was his best outing,” Showalter said. “He felt great. He threw the ball well, no walks. It was the best outing he's had.” Tuesday's outing was Bundy's sixth with Frederick and his ninth minor league start since returning from last year's Tommy John elbow ligament reconstruction surgery.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 16, 2014
Baltimore City Council President Bernard "Jack" Young is requesting that school officials brief city leaders on the extent to which students are receiving a "complete education" in their schools. Young will introduce a resolution Monday that seeks information about offerings like arts and physical education. In a release, Young said a lack of arts and physical education, or what he calls an "incomplete curriculum," has been a disservice to city students. “A focus on basic education that leaves arts education and physical education aside ignores the competencies demanded by the complex, modern world in which Baltimore City Public Schools students are expected to thrive,” Young said in a statement.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 26, 2000
It's always somewhat disconcerting for a critic to come across a work of art for which no words come readily to mind. That's a situation I find myself in over and over again when confronted by the sculpture of John Van Alstine, whose large-scale stone and steel constructions are on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery through the end of the month. To be speechless is a tip-off that a mystery may be involved, and so I find myself returning to these enigmatic works in search of some revelation, some intuition as to what they might be. I once described them as "gravity-defying" assemblages that confound the laws of physics.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
Zaka Israel Slawsky, a physics professor who co-founded a clinic at the University of Maryland, College Park where retired scientists tutor struggling students, died of heart and respiratory failure Wednesday at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington. He was 93. With his twin brother, Milton, a fellow physicist and constant companion, Dr. Slawsky founded the Mollie and Simon Slawsky Memorial Tutoring Clinic for Physics, named for their parents, in 1975. The pair never spent more than 24 hours apart until they were 30 years old, married sisters in the 1940s, and even lived in the same Chevy Chase apartment building until this year.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
For top-seeded Duke, No. 5 Denver, No. 6 Notre Dame and No. 7 Maryland, Saturday's semifinal round of the NCAA tournament at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore takes center stage in terms of preparation and focus. But for two of those teams, Monday's title game is nearly as imposing. Championship weekend presents the two programs that advance to the tournament final with the unique dilemma of going all-out in Saturday's semifinals, recovering physically on Sunday, and finding enough in the fuel tank to play in Monday's final.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Opening a new hotel bar in Harbor East poses a challenge. Aesthetically, the neighborhood requires chicness, but there is also a desire to appeal to all comers, especially given the proximity to downtown. Straddling the line between comfort and sophistication demands a delicate touch. It all leads to the question: How does a hotel bar attract a local crowd? Apropoe's, the ambitious bar and restaurant inside the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, has attempted to find an answer.
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