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THE BALTIMORE SUN | January 18, 2003
Martin Davidson, 80, Johns Hopkins physicist Martin Davidson, a retired Johns Hopkins physicist and musician, died Wednesday of Alzheimer's disease at the Millennium Health Center in Ellicott City. The Bethesda resident was 80. Born in New York, he earned a degree in physics from City College of New York in 1943, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. After serving in the Army during and after World War II, he worked in classified defense and research projects at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Howard County for 30 years.
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NEWS
April 2, 2014
It's an interesting coincidence that two articles having to do with the First Amendment's freedom of religion clause recently appeared in The Sun. The simpler one was about a lady complaining her freedom of religion was being violated by county officials offering prayers before their meetings ("As Carroll debates prayer, founding fathers' faith comes into focus," March 29). The somewhat more complicated article was about a physicist's finding of a particle smaller than the smallest one known to exist since the 1960s ( "Documentary follows 'Particle Fever' surrounding Higgs boson discovery," March 19)
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NEWS
May 31, 2002
Bernard Ford Hochheimer, a research physicist, optics expert and farmer, died of heart failure May 24 at his home in Bartow, Fla. The former Lineboro resident was 73. Mr. Hochheimer retired in 1995 from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. He also conducted optics-related research at John Hopkins Hospital's Wilmer Eye Institute. Born and raised in Rochester, N.Y., he earned a bachelor's degree in 1951 from St. Bonaventure University in St. Bonaventure, N.Y., and a master's degree in optics in 1953 from the University of Rochester.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
You can't see the Higgs boson, but you can watch its discovery. Scientists crowd around dozens of monitors as they collect data from experiments using a looping 17-mile underground tunnel and equipment likened to a five-story Swiss watch. They worry what the media might say if tests fail, and wonder whether the experiment should have been conducted in secret. And they clamor for a seat in the auditorium where physicists will present their findings in the hunt for the elusive "God particle," a subatomic building block that existed only in theory, but had never been detected.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 12, 1995
Princeton, N.J. -- Edward Witten, who may be the smartest man in the world, seems slightly puzzled by the question put to him: How, his interrogator wants to know, would he describe a typical day in the life of a theoretical physicist? The question is followed by a long silence, one that threatens to turn uncomfortable. It fills his large, corner office at the Institute for Advanced Study, a theoretical research center that is home to a small group of the world's finest thinkers.Which is what Dr. Witten is doing right now: thinking before he answers the question.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2004
Cheryl Lynn Tropf, an accountant and former physicist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig's disease, Wednesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Highland resident was 57. Born Cheryl Lynn Griffiths in Newark, N.J., and raised in Fairfax, Va., she earned a physics degree from the College of William & Mary, where she played varsity field hockey and belonged to Kappa Delta sorority and Phi Beta Kappa. She was named the outstanding student of her Georgetown University class while earning a master's degree in accounting.
NEWS
By Stanley Blumberg | May 9, 1993
HEISENBERG'S WAR:THE SECRET HISTORY OFTHE GERMAN BOMB.Thomas Powers.Knopf.` 585 pages. $27.50.During World War II, U.S.-based scientists worked feverishly to develop the atomic bomb. Their fear was that if Hitler won the nuclear race, Fascism would rule all of Europe.Their concern focused on the scientific genius of one man, German physicist Werner Heisenberg. By 1939, the theory of nuclear fission -- with its potential for destruction and as a future source of power -- was well known to a small group of scientists, including the Nobel laureate Heisenberg.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | December 31, 1995
"A TRUMPET shall sound and the dead shall be raised," we are told in the Bible, and for centuries believers have taken this prophecy literally. Yet until now, belief in the world to come has been exclusively a matter of religious faith, unsupported by the tenets of modern science.So it's no wonder that physicist Frank J. Tipler has created a stir with his recent book, "The Physics of Immortality," which purports to demonstrate to a mathematical certainty that the ancient promise of the soul's redemption shall indeed come to pass.
NEWS
September 2, 2007
Alexander Fraser Holser, a physicist retired from the CIA and the Department of the Interior, died Aug. 24 at the Pickersgill retirement community in Towson of cancer and complications from a fall. He was 84. Mr. Holser, who was born in Bakersfield, Calif., graduated from Moore Park High School in California. He began attending the California Institute of Technology but went into the Army during World War II, serving for three years until 1946. After his service, he resumed his studies at Cal Tech as an undergraduate research fellow, earning a physics and mathematics degree in 1948.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 28, 2005
QED" is the abbreviation of the Latin phrase quod erat demonstrandum ("which was demonstrated"). My father used to kid that the letters, often used at the end of mathematical proofs, actually stood for "Quite Easily Done."
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Dr. Gordon Feldman, a Johns Hopkins physicist who contributed to discovery of the antiproton, died in his sleep Wednesday at Symphony Manor Assisted Living from complications of Alzheimer's. The Baltimore resident was 85. The son of a street peddler and homemaker grew up the youngest of six children in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Feldman received a full scholarship to study at University of Toronto in Canada and graduated with a bachelor's degree in physics in 1950. He was the first in his family to attend college.
NEWS
By Michael Corbin | October 16, 2011
I told some friends that Tomas Tranströmer had won the Nobel Prize. Some responded, "Who?" and others said that it was cool that someone in Baltimore had won the Nobel. This latter group, of course, had heard the local hubbub and were thinking about Adam Riess at the Johns Hopkins University, who (along with two other physicists) was awarded the Nobel in physics for showing that the universe is still expanding. Mr. Riess was able to infer this by observing close by and further away supernovae.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 9, 2011
Thor, the Marvel Comics superhero, hammered his way into movie theaters over the weekend, saving the world, winning Natalie Portman and grossing about $66 million. Kenneth Branagh's "Thor" is based on Stan Lee's Thor, which is based on the Thor of Norse mythology — god of thunder and protector of mankind. Some pioneering scientists of the early 19th century were so taken with Thor's immortal powers that they named a radioactive element after him. Nearly two centuries later, some modern scientists, including a Nobel Prize laureate, believe thorium could play a major role in saving mankind from global warming.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 17, 2011
Thomas Fulton, a longtime physics professor at the Johns Hopkins University who swapped notes with the great minds of science, died of heart failure on April 8 at his daughter's home in Ruxton. He was 83. Born Tamas Feuerzeug, in Budapest, Hungary, he immigrated to the United States with his family in 1941 at the age of 14. His immediate family fled Nazis in Hungary and Germany, where many of his other family members died in the Holocaust, and traveled to fascist Spain, where he secured three boat tickets to Cuba by borrowing $100 from a British consular official.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
Joseph Mark Heimerl, a retired Aberdeen Proving Ground physicist and author, died Tuesday of cancer at his Havre de Grace home. He was 70. Dr. Heimerl, the son of a high school teacher and a homemaker, was born and raised in Gloucester, N.J. After graduating from St. Joseph Preparatory High School in Philadelphia in 1957, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1961 in physics from St. Joseph's University, also in Philadelphia. He earned a doctorate in physics in 1968 from the University of Pittsburgh, and from 1968 to 1970 conducted research for NASA at Moffett Field in Mountain View, Calif.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
John Stearns Thomsen, a retired Johns Hopkins University physicist who was a founder of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died of respiratory failure Wednesday at his North Roland Park home. He was 88. Born in Baltimore and raised on Mount Royal Terrace in Reservoir Hill, he was a 1939 Boys' Latin School graduate. A year later, he joined the National Railway Historical Society and remained a train and streetcar aficionado throughout his life. He earned a bachelor's degree in engineering from Hopkins.
NEWS
By John Noble Wilford and John Noble Wilford,New York Times News Service | May 24, 1992
BERKELEY, Calif. -- On the first day back in his office at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory after his own professional "big bang," Dr. George F. Smoot tasted the celebratory cake and submitted to a shower of confetti, all the while casting a twinkling eye this way and that on the fame now engulfing him.He was living through what his fellow physicists might call a phase transition in the long process of a scientific discovery. He had slogged through all the early steps: the definition of the question and the development of a way to answer it, with a set of instruments to be flown on a satellite.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2000
Warned last fall that it was likely he would be charged with federal tax evasion, Thomas A. Korjack didn't hang around to see what would happen, investigators said yesterday. A nuclear physicist at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Korjack, 49, took out a $280,000 mortgage on his Churchville home, liquidated his investments and started missing work for days at a time, according to a federal affidavit. A week ago, Internal Revenue Service detectives caught Korjack in Wyoming, where he was living under an assumed name.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 5, 2010
Lester Marvin Sachs, who retired from the Social Security Administration, died March 28 from dementia at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 82. Dr. Sachs, the son of a carpet salesman and a homemaker, was born and raised in Chicago. He served in the Army as a cook and later a photographer, and attended the Illinois Institute of Technology on the GI Bill, where he earned his bachelor's, master's and doctorate in solid state physics in the early 1950s.
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