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NEWS
June 23, 2010
Congressman John Sarbanes had an excellent letter on the shortage of primary care physicians in Maryland (Readers respond, June 18 Baltimore Sun). His proposal for a public service loan forgiveness option is a step in the right direction to encourage physicians to enter primary health care practice. However student loan burden is a vast understatement of the true costs of becoming a primary care physician. In addition to medical school tuition, there is forgone income for four years of medical school, reduced income for three years of residency training and accrued interest on all of the above amounts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
An American physician exposed to the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone is expected to be admitted to the National Institutes of Health, officials at the Bethesda-based agency said Saturday in a statement. NIH officials said that the patient, who was volunteering in an Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone, is expected to be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center for observation as well as to take part in a clinical study. Officials offered no additional information about the patient. "Out of an abundance of caution, the patient will be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center's special clinical studies unit that is specifically designed to provide high-level isolation capabilities and is staffed by infectious diseases and critical care specialists," NIH officials said.
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NEWS
December 13, 2012
Everyone is a doctor until proven otherwise. I can show you my current medical license, but Shawn Nowlin couldn't have shown you anything ("Schools employee charged with sex with teen," Nov. 29). It is horrific that he allegedly got a 15-year-old girl pregnant. People bet their life that the person in front of them claiming to be a doctor can help. Chiropractors, acupuncturists and naturopaths, physician's assistants and nurse practitioners are not physicians and they should not call themselves "doctor" or let people call them that.
NEWS
August 24, 2014
The dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing recently claimed that "today, nurses are full partners and leaders in the heath care process" ( "This is not crazy; this is nursing," Aug. 18). But if that's so, why are nurses (primarily a female workforce) still being paid at a flat per diem rate out of their hospital's room and board line item? According to a 2007 article in the Journal of Nursing Administration, during the 1920s nurses presented a separate bill to the patient at discharge that directly competed with the hospital and physician bills.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
The Maryland Board of Physicians is expected to get some advice Wednesday on how to reform itself, eight months after a legislative review found the panel was not working fast or efficiently enough to protect the public from bad doctors. Dr. Jay Perman, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore, was expected to offer his recommendations for overhauling the system of reviewing complaints, which auditors said took far too long to be resolved. The board was also criticized for not having a uniform system of review and lacking transparency, sometimes in violation of open meetings laws.
NEWS
August 5, 2014
Faculty at the prestigious Johns Hopkins School of Medicine conclude, in a letter responding to the July 25 article "Medical marijuana rules for doctors raise concerns" that requirements on physicians recommending marijuana for medical use are "not a burden" ( "Physicians need periodic checkups in medical marijuana use," Aug. 1) That might be true in an ideal world. However, imposing unnecessary hurdles for doctors, like mandatory registration and special training, will invariably chill physician participation in the Maryland medical marijuana program.
NEWS
August 24, 2014
The dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing recently claimed that "today, nurses are full partners and leaders in the heath care process" ( "This is not crazy; this is nursing," Aug. 18). But if that's so, why are nurses (primarily a female workforce) still being paid at a flat per diem rate out of their hospital's room and board line item? According to a 2007 article in the Journal of Nursing Administration, during the 1920s nurses presented a separate bill to the patient at discharge that directly competed with the hospital and physician bills.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
The Maryland Board of Physicians, which has faced scrutiny in recent months because of its backlog of cases and other problems, is getting a new leader, state health officials said Wednesday. Carole J. Catalfo will begin work as the executive director Feb. 21, according to Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. "Carole Catalfo is the right person at the right time for the Board of Physicians," Sharfstein said. "She brings both deep experience in regulatory compliance and professional oversight and a fresh perspective on the challenges facing the board.
EXPLORE
December 2, 2011
St. Agnes Hospital announced the induction of nine doctors to the Healing Hands Society. The physicians were honored for clinical excellence and leadership plus service to the community and their hand imprints were added to a recently unveiled wall. Those recognized were Dr. Karen Broderick, Dr. James Castellano, Dr. Michael Ellis, Dr. Keith Falcao, Dr. Deepak Merchant, Dr. Arturo Santos, Dr. William Signor III, Dr. Willard Standiford and Dr. Michael Zatina.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1997
The Johns Hopkins University and Milles, Oken and Seals have created a partnership expanding the physicians' internal medicine practice in Columbia.The partnership, announced yesterday, gives Hopkins a minority interest in the Howard County practice.In return, Hopkins agreed to establish specialty clinics, preventive care programs and a clinical research center staffed by Hopkins faculty and Howard County physicians.Hopkins said it will lease space at 5900 Cedar Lane in Columbia, near Howard County General Hospital, to provide space for the clinics.
NEWS
By Janet Simon Schreck | August 21, 2014
While the roles of depression and addiction in Robin William's suicide were the focus of most news stories about his death, perhaps the headlines should have focused on his recent diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, highlighting the intricate relationships between neurological diseases and mental health conditions. The U.S. health care system is woefully inadequate at addressing the overlap between the body, mind and soul in these patients. The anatomical, physiological and neurochemical changes in the brain associated with neurological disorders - such as stroke, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease - can exacerbate or worsen previously existing mental health conditions including depression and anxiety.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Dr. Garfield D. Kington, a physician who was a familiar and comforting presence to his West Baltimore patients for decades, died Aug. 3 of multiple myeloma at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 91. "We were colleagues on the medical staff at Provident Hospital and became friends. I met Dr. Kington and observed him in his office, where he worked late through the day seeing patients in a tough neighborhood and provided an excellent standard of care," said Dr. Keiffer Mitchell, an internist who has practiced in Baltimore for 43 years.
NEWS
By Dwaine Rieves | August 8, 2014
He stood, dropped his pants and as one pocket crumpled, the other didn't. There it was: the creased outline of what appeared to be a pistol in the right hip pocket. I steeled and turned my attention to the specimen collection kit on the work shelf before me. The door was closed. We were alone in the exam room. This would be just fine, I told myself. To which another part of my brain responded - well, if it isn't, are you prepared? Ask me about my fears back when I first started volunteering to do sexually transmitted disease testing in a downtown Washington D.C. clinic for gay men, and my answer would involve an embarrassing lesson taught by a young patient in pumps and a halter top. Back then, not really knowing my patients - their backgrounds, social situations, lingo and interaction style - was pretty much my only fear.
NEWS
August 5, 2014
Faculty at the prestigious Johns Hopkins School of Medicine conclude, in a letter responding to the July 25 article "Medical marijuana rules for doctors raise concerns" that requirements on physicians recommending marijuana for medical use are "not a burden" ( "Physicians need periodic checkups in medical marijuana use," Aug. 1) That might be true in an ideal world. However, imposing unnecessary hurdles for doctors, like mandatory registration and special training, will invariably chill physician participation in the Maryland medical marijuana program.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
A recent article raised a number of questions about medical marijuana in Maryland and the risk its use poses to public trust in the medical community ("Medical pot rules raise concern," July 26). As health care providers for this city's children, adolescents and young adults, we witness the harmful effects of chronic marijuana use on health and development in our practice every day. We are thus skeptical of Del. Dan K. Morhaim's assertion that the requirement for continuing medical education for physicians prescribing medical marijuana in Maryland is too burdensome.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Dr. Thomas F. "Tim" Herbert, a well-known Howard County physician who practiced family medicine in Ellicott City for 40 years, died Sunday of cancer at William Hill Manor in Easton. He was 86. "Tim was such a wonderful guy and he was wonderful to me," said Dr. Harry C. Knipp, a radiologist and longtime friend. "He lived and practiced medicine in the home he grew up in that overlooked Ellicott City. " The son of Dr. Alpha Nathan Herbert, a physician, and Dorothy Kraft Herbert, a registered nurse, Thomas Franklyn Herbert, who was known as "Tim," was born in Baltimore and raised in Ellicott City.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
The state Board of Physicians Tuesday suspended the license of a Salisbury pain doctor, who the board said had not been using proper safeguards in prescribing opiates. Separately, state health officials had suspended Dr. Brent R. Fox's authority to write prescriptions for opiates and other controlled dangerous substances last week after their own investigation showed he was prescribing drugs in amounts outside of standards and was not conducting thorough exams of patients. The new action means the doctor can't practice medicine in Maryland for now. The doctor had been referred to the state by a managed-care organization with which Fox was affiliated, and the state has become more aggressive in tackling abuse of highly addictive painkillers.
HEALTH
By Karen Harrop | October 2, 1990
Choosing a physician can be a little like selecting a new car or stereo system. You ask friends or family for recommendations, then shop around for the best deal. Of course, it's not the quality of music at stake here, but your very health and well-being.Still, shopping around is considered the best way to find thright doctor for you."People should approach health care as consumers, to foster a mutual responsibility model of care, not the former model of dependency or a parent-child relationship," says Dr. Frank Claudy, chief of the Department of Family Practice at Maryland General Hospital.
NEWS
By Pooja Singal, Adi Rattner and Meghana Desale | July 16, 2014
As physicians in training at Johns Hopkins Hospital, we are deeply concerned about the consequences that Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. will have on our ability to provide comprehensive, quality health care to our patients. Under the Hobby Lobby ruling, coverage for four specific forms of contraception may be denied to women employed by closely held corporations, which represent thousands of American businesses employing millions of American women. The forms of birth control that can now legally be withheld from insurance plans include intrauterine devices (IUDs, both hormonal and non-hormonal)
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
The Maryland Board of Physicians upheld on Thursday its decision to suspend Dr. William Dando's medical license based on his indictment in Allegany County for an alleged sexual assault. Dando appeared before the board Wednesday and was given the chance to argue why the suspension, issued June 5, should be lifted. A presentation from Dando and his lawyer did not dissuade the board that "there exists a substantial risk of serious harm to the public health, safety or welfare in Dr. Dando's continued practice," acting board Executive Director Christine Farrelly wrote in a letter posted to the board website Thursday.
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