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Physician Assistants

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NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
North Arundel Hospital has joined some hospitals in the state in adding physician assistants to speed emergency room care, resulting in an average 20-minute cut in waiting times, a spokesman said yesterday."
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Del. Heather R. Mizeur promised to push for a law allowing physician-assisted suicide in Maryland if elected governor. "If terminally ill, mentally competent adults choose to end their life, they should be able to seek a life-ending dose of medicine from their physician," Mizeur said in a policy proposal released late Tuesday. Three states - Oregon, Washington, and Vermont - have similar policies, dubbed by advocates "Death with Dignity" laws. Mizeur, a Democrat from Montgomery County, outlined her call for legalization of doctor-assisted suicide along with ideas to help seniors as they retire, age, get sick and approach death.
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NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 1996
GORDON LOETZ has been named chairman of the Chesapeake Academy Board of Trustees for the 1996-1997 school year.Other officers are Jane Pehlke, president; Anne Schellie, first vice chairman; Pennington Hopkins, second vice chairman, and Patricia McManus, treasurer.General board members include Pamela Anderson, Richard Barnard, Eleanor Davidov, John Dunbar, Fred Graul, Richard Martin, Carl Salbold, Virginia Skiest, Patricia Troy, Fred Bednark, Frances Counihan, Julianne Deger, George Goreyab, Sheila Kendall, George Moran, Ethel Rew, Louise Sivy and Jerry Smith.
HEALTH
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
For 11 days last summer, Shawna Gunter worked as a physician assistant, treating 200 patients at a Centreville doctor's office and prescribing medication. But, authorities said Friday, the 36-year-old had no medical training. Federal prosecutors said she got her job with documents that contained errors — including a license with a different last name — and now faces charges of wire fraud and aggravated identity theft. U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein called the allegations "very troubling.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 28, 2000
Towson University and the Essex campus of the Community College of Baltimore County will offer a collaborative master's degree program for students pursuing careers as physician assistants. Officials from the schools say students will benefit from a larger faculty pool and increased resources. Essex has an accredited certificate program for prospective physician assistants. With the new partnership, students can earn a certificate from CCBC Essex and a master's degree from Towson. Towson's master of science degree in physician assistant studies is the only such program in Maryland.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When Dr. Claude Harwood retired in 1990 after 34 years as an old-fashioned family doctor in rural Glasco, Kan., population 600, his patients faced an uncertain future: There was no physician in town to replace him.Instead, he turned his practice over to two nurse practitioners -- nurses with advanced medical training who in many states can even write prescriptions."
NEWS
December 18, 2012
Letter writer Ted Houk resorts to specious statements to argue that patients should verify the credentials of their caregivers to make sure they are being treated by licensed physicians rather than by people who merely claim to be doctors ("Beware of charlatans claiming to be physicians," Dec. 13). He uses as an example Shawn Nowlen, the Baltimore city schools employee who marketed himself to parents as a social worker and a counselor when in fact he was neither, and who impregnated at 15-year-old girl whose mother entrusted her to his care.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | April 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Nurses, historically relegated to a secondar status in the world of medicine, would assume a more significant, independent role in providing health care under the White House health-care plan, specialists and administration sources say.But doctors say they would fight efforts to give nurses more independence.The Clinton health plan, with its emphasis on preventive care, would call for greater reliance on services that nurses already are trained to perform. And a shortage of doctors who practice general medicine means highly trained nurses probably will be called upon in greater numbers when the government offers health care to the nation's 37 million uninsured.
NEWS
September 29, 2002
Parents, students invited to meeting about the PSAT Annapolis High School is holding a PSAT Information Night from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday for parents and students throughout the district. School counselors will explain the test and discuss reasons for taking it. High school students in grades nine through 11 are scheduled to take the PSAT on Oct. 15. The fee for taking the test will be paid by the Anne Arundel County public school system. Information sessions on PSAT results are scheduled Jan. 7 at Annapolis High School and Jan. 23 at Meade High School.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
State officials on Tuesday announced a plan to increase the number of primary care health professionals by as much as 25 percent in the next decade through a wide range of goals that include increased educational opportunities, financial incentives and tort reform. Maryland and the rest of the country are dealing with a shortage of primary care physicians and fear the problem will worsen when health care reform adds millions more people to the insurance rolls. Nearly 360,000 new people will have access to insurance in Maryland by 2020.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Jeffrey F. Ritter, a physician's assistant who was recalled for his bedside manner and willingness to listen, died Friday of cardiac arrest related to kidney disease at Hanover Hospital in Pennsylvania. The former Westminster resident was 55. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ellicott City, he was the son of Gregory B. Ritter, a retired Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. worker, and Josephine O. Foster Ritter, a homemaker and real estate sales agent, who died this year. Mr. Ritter was a 1976 graduate of Howard High School, where he ran track.
NEWS
December 18, 2012
Letter writer Ted Houk resorts to specious statements to argue that patients should verify the credentials of their caregivers to make sure they are being treated by licensed physicians rather than by people who merely claim to be doctors ("Beware of charlatans claiming to be physicians," Dec. 13). He uses as an example Shawn Nowlen, the Baltimore city schools employee who marketed himself to parents as a social worker and a counselor when in fact he was neither, and who impregnated at 15-year-old girl whose mother entrusted her to his care.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
State officials on Tuesday announced a plan to increase the number of primary care health professionals by as much as 25 percent in the next decade through a wide range of goals that include increased educational opportunities, financial incentives and tort reform. Maryland and the rest of the country are dealing with a shortage of primary care physicians and fear the problem will worsen when health care reform adds millions more people to the insurance rolls. Nearly 360,000 new people will have access to insurance in Maryland by 2020.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Are you ready for Watson to join you and your doctor in the examining room? That could be the outcome of a collaboration under way between Watson's creators at IBM and experts at the University of Maryland's School of Medicine. They have begun work on merging the speech recognition and question-answering skills of Watson — the computer that beat two humans on "Jeopardy!" this week — with the vast stores of clinical knowledge and analytical skills in the medical profession.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | March 30, 2007
You might say Patrick Hyde has experience delivering medical care under extreme pressure. As a Navy medical corpsman in Iraq, he suffered a serious arm injury when his Humvee was blasted by a roadside bomb. Before dealing with his arm, he tended to one comrade with a severe leg injury, another with a face wound, reaching into his duffel-bag-sized kit for medications and equipment. Then, he told the others how to care for him. "I directed the soldiers to apply a battle dressing and give me an IV," he recounted.
NEWS
June 24, 2005
Charles D. Keeling, 77, a scientist whose measurements showing a carbon-dioxide buildup in the atmosphere helped trigger fears of global warming, died Monday in Hamilton, Mont., after a heart attack. A pioneer in demonstrating that increased emissions of greenhouse gases could change the environment, he began collecting air samples in 1955 to measure their carbon dioxide content. His measurements over the decades that followed showed that carbon dioxide levels were steadily rising, a finding that shattered the conventional wisdom that the Earth could soak up rising fossil fuel emissions without harm.
NEWS
June 24, 2005
Charles D. Keeling, 77, a scientist whose measurements showing a carbon-dioxide buildup in the atmosphere helped trigger fears of global warming, died Monday in Hamilton, Mont., after a heart attack. A pioneer in demonstrating that increased emissions of greenhouse gases could change the environment, he began collecting air samples in 1955 to measure their carbon dioxide content. His measurements over the decades that followed showed that carbon dioxide levels were steadily rising, a finding that shattered the conventional wisdom that the Earth could soak up rising fossil fuel emissions without harm.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | March 30, 2007
You might say Patrick Hyde has experience delivering medical care under extreme pressure. As a Navy medical corpsman in Iraq, he suffered a serious arm injury when his Humvee was blasted by a roadside bomb. Before dealing with his arm, he tended to one comrade with a severe leg injury, another with a face wound, reaching into his duffel-bag-sized kit for medications and equipment. Then, he told the others how to care for him. "I directed the soldiers to apply a battle dressing and give me an IV," he recounted.
NEWS
September 29, 2002
Parents, students invited to meeting about the PSAT Annapolis High School is holding a PSAT Information Night from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday for parents and students throughout the district. School counselors will explain the test and discuss reasons for taking it. High school students in grades nine through 11 are scheduled to take the PSAT on Oct. 15. The fee for taking the test will be paid by the Anne Arundel County public school system. Information sessions on PSAT results are scheduled Jan. 7 at Annapolis High School and Jan. 23 at Meade High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul McHugh and Paul McHugh,Special to the Sun | March 17, 2002
In 1991, Mary Ann Glendon, the Learned Hand Professor of Jurisprudence at Harvard Law School, wrote a discerning book, Rights Talk: The Impoverishment of Political Discourse (The Free Press, 218 pages, $22.95) in which she noted that contemporary American discourse over such issues as property, sexual activity, abortion, social welfare and the like was deteriorating into sound bites, slogans and the strident language of "my rights." In this process our opinions were becoming hyperpolarized, exaggeratedly absolute, coarsely self-centered and remarkably silent about personal, civic and collective responsibilities.
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